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Stretching? Lifting? Yay or Nay for runners? (Read 2769 times)


i'm lovin' it... MM#1949

    This is an interesting thread and as a Masters runner (57), I've tried all sorts of differrent approaches.  I can see in this thread that there are as many opinions on stretch, not stretch, static, dynamic.... as there are types of stretches and each of us is an experiment of one.

     

    My latest belief is alot in line with what Nobby points out.  Running makes you a better runner.

     

    I've had my share of injuries (always a different part) but it "seemed" to me that alot of them came after I changed something in either stretching or cross training or just running form.  So this training cycle I've changed everything to one simple recipe.

     

    1. I run EVERY day

    2. I regularly incorporate 20-30 sec striders at random in most runs

    3. I completely stopped stretching

    4. I completely stopped cross training

    5. I run "fast", I run moderate, I run hills, I run flats, I run short (3 miles), I run long (20 miles), I stopped running really slow (we won't mention paces here, just the concepts)

     

    Result:

    My legs get tight after alot of long runs but loosen right up again after some speed (tempo) running and especially with more striders (short sprints).

    It seems that running fast for short periods which calls on wider range of motion, is the perfect dynamic stretching which can be done while running.

    [Chicken and the Egg...  wider rage of motion helps you run faster vs running faster gives you wider range of motion]

     

    My legs feel fine and I'm up to 125 days of running everyday (65 MPW level)

     

    Also contrarian in my training is shoes.  I used to ditch them (Asics 2XXX series)after 400 miles. Now I'm comfortably running on pairs with 700-1200 miles (I actually un-retired some of my older shoes)...There was a statement in Born to Run that caught my attention regarding new shoes..

     

    Conclusion:  Go figure.. Running can make you better stretched? Seriously, have you noticed after you stop running for a day the legs tighen up? ok maybe just us old guys...

    Perch's Profile "I don't know if running adds years to your life, but it definitely adds life to your years." - Jim Fixx "The secret is to make in your mind possible what was not possible before. The secret is to make easy what was difficult, instead to make difficult what really is easy." - Coach Renato Canova
    MrH


      Stretching and strength work may not help directly with running faster, but they certainly seem to improve recovery and also reduce injury for many.

       

      For older folks, recovery and injury avoidance is a very big deal. And you aren't going to get faster when injured. Smile

      The process is the goal.

      Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.

      MrH


        Of course, if you can run all the hard workouts you want without getting hurt, and without any stretching or strength training, then there's no reason to waste time doing them. Smile

        The process is the goal.

        Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.


        No Talent Drips

           

          My latest belief is alot in line with what Nobby points out.  Running makes you a better runner.

           

          No argument with this...but is not the only thing that can make one a better runner. 

           

          I'd simply add that adding the I right kind of weight training (high intensity, moderate weight, moderate reps, for example) can help a softie who is looking to PR drop a few pounds and run lighter. 

           Dei Gratia

           

            Yay for lifting. Yay for light stretching after a warm-up, before speed work, or after a normal run.


            cixelsiD

              I say what works for you works best. Experiment. Listen to your body. I prefer a core performance workout from Mark Verstegen. Info can be found at the core performance website. I feel like spring bouncing down the road effortlessly.


              sincerely silly

                No argument with this...but is not the only thing that can make one a better runner. 

                 

                I'd simply add that adding the I right kind of weight training (high intensity, moderate weight, moderate reps, for example) can help a softie who is looking to PR drop a few pounds and run lighter. 

                 

                I agree with this. Just like people have said it depends on your goals. I can't imagine not doing some strength training or stretching to just help keep your body in generally good shape, or just to help lose some weight, cut fat, strengthen your back if need be, etc. And what if you encounter a bear on your run or something? =P Gotta fight and parkour out of that situation and strength training would help. :-) (Or are we differentiating strength training and lifting?) But I'm willing to admit that it might just be old gym class wisdom that tells me that. The same that said stretching prevented injury before activity!

                shin splints are my nemesis

                raechickx


                  I've been following the resistance stretching plan in Dara Torres' book for about a year and would recommend it to anyone. Especially the day after a long run, you just feel like a new person. 

                  http://www.amazon.com/Gold-Medal-Fitness-Revolutionary-Program/dp/0767931947

                  Eoin


                    I sometimes do dynamic stretching before a run, usually I just start running slowly and pick it up after a few KMs. I always do static stretching after a run/workout and find that helps.

                    I do gym work twice a week, not very high weights and if I feel like I am finding it easy I put in more reps, not more weight.

                     

                    Eoin

                    Eoin

                    Next goal: Sub4hr in DCM

                     

                    http://eobeara.blogspot.com

                    hskrtroy


                      I lift weights twice a week.  My lifting requires a lot of cardiovascular endurance because I do supersets.  (If you don't know what they are, it's when you do two or three lifts at the same time.)  I have little (20-30 seconds) or no break in between each lift.  My lifting workouts are always full body and have a lot of core work involved in them. 

                       

                      I'm a huge proponent of static stretching after a workout.  My knees would start to hurt after 4 miles or so of running.  Then I started stretching my hamstrings and my knee pains went away.  Over the years, as other things have started hurting (like my foot, back, or elbow), I've started doing a lot more stretching with great results.  Now, every time I talk to someone who is having a pain of some sort I suggest stretching to help it.  Most people do what they want to do and that's fine, but one guy actually took my advice and now he swears by stretching also.

                       

                      When I'm not training for a marathon, I'll run about 25 miles a week.  Not, a ton, but I don't plan on winning my races anyway.  I just want to enjoy working out.  To me, that's what it's really about.  Having fun staying fit.  I want to get better and be competitive in my age group, but it's not my main goal.

                       

                      All that being said, everyone is different.  Each body is different and needs special attention.  Find what works for you and enjoy it.

                        Weights two days a week for me now and 40 minutes of core training 3 days a week.  My running has never been stronger once I started focusing more on core.

                        Bryan Castro


                          I have just starting running to run as opposed to cross-training for other things (in my case, martial arts). However, I have found that my strength training, which is heavy lifting with several basic movements (e.g. deadlift, press, squat) once a week and some other exercises another day a week (e.g. dips, chin-ups, kettlebell stuff) have really helped with my core strength and helped prevent injuries for running. About 8-10 years ago, I used to run with less emphasis on these other things and I always had problems with lower back pain. However, I feel the strength training has really helped to prevent that.

                           

                          Plus, and I guess this can't be ignored, I enjoy lifting heavy stuff. If I'm hindering my running in any way, I'm willing to accept that and at my level, the difference between running at 24 min. 5k vs. a 23:50 5k is not enough for me to stop.

                           

                          I also stretch, although some of the things I've read seem to indicate that it's not necessary for injury prevention...but again, it just feels good, so I do it.

                           

                          Just my 2 cents.

                           

                          Cheers!

                          2011-2012 Running Goals

                          5K under 22:00

                          8K under 37:30 (in 2011)

                          HM under 1:51:00

                          Complete Marathon

                           

                          mommy23


                            As a former female competitive bodybuilder and now an endurance athlete, here are my thoughts....weightlifting is extremely advantageous! You don't have to go over board with it but 2-3 days a week will keep your muscles and bones strong. We could go back and forth about what the rep range should be however, this is very dependent on your physique and your goals. I for instance, want to lose muscle mass since it's going to improve my overall performance as I'm a cyclist and a runner. My years of heavy leg training gives me a huge advantage when climbing hills however, the overall mass is just added weight that I have to carry.  Therefore, if you want strength without the bulk consider low reps and heavy weights...similar to powerlifting. The ideal rep range for putting on muscle is 8-12 reps. Anything above this is...well, it depends! High reps may yield gains in particular muscle groups as some muscles respond better to various rep ranges. There's nothing worse then a flabby runner and I see plenty of them.

                             

                            Stretching is great! Nothing feels better to me then a good stretch halfway through my workout, whether lifting or biking or running.

                              As a former female competitive bodybuilder and now an endurance athlete, here are my thoughts....weightlifting is extremely advantageous! You don't have to go over board with it but 2-3 days a week will keep your muscles and bones strong. We could go back and forth about what the rep range should be however, this is very dependent on your physique and your goals. I for instance, want to lose muscle mass since it's going to improve my overall performance as I'm a cyclist and a runner. My years of heavy leg training gives me a huge advantage when climbing hills however, the overall mass is just added weight that I have to carry.  Therefore, if you want strength without the bulk consider low reps and heavy weights...similar to powerlifting. The ideal rep range for putting on muscle is 8-12 reps. Anything above this is...well, it depends! High reps may yield gains in particular muscle groups as some muscles respond better to various rep ranges. There's nothing worse then a flabby runner and I see plenty of them.

                               

                              Stretching is great! Nothing feels better to me then a good stretch halfway through my workout, whether lifting or biking or running.

                               

                              how about a flabby non-runner? I see lots more of them. Joking

                              xor


                                If you believe that there's nothing worse than a flabby runner, and you see lots of them... does it make you flabbygasted?

                                 

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