1

What's the difference between working out and training...? (Read 751 times)


2008 Philly Trifecta

    I considered myself one who "worked out" or "jogged" for years...I even ran a 10k, 8k, and 5k in the past... I would remain "on the wagon" for several weeks, even months, then...WHAMMO Black eye It wasn't until I signed up a few months back to run my 1st half marathon this Nov that something clicked... I researched, counted the cost, and devised a plan that would get my base mileage up, my weight down, and get me moving in the right direction. It was simply changing my mindset to one that I am not just "working out", but I am in training! I have a goal to run a 1/2 marathon this year (I'll be 39). The 1/2 marathon is on the same day as the full 26.2 Philly Marathon. If all goes well, my goal is to return in 08 and run the full marathon (I will then be 40) For me, it was writing down a goal, developing a plan, and a change in mindset, that I'm not just going to "work out"...but I am in training So, I'd like to hear from you... Do you think there is a differrence? If so, what was the change for you? Dave

    ***Check out my site: where I've been, and where I'm going @ releasetherunner.blogspot.com
    2008 Philly Trifecta:
    10 Mile Broad St Run-5/4
    Philly Distance Run HM-9/21
    Philly Marathon-11/23
    "A goal not written down is only a dream...!"


    Needs more cowbell!

      When I first started running about a year and a half ago I merely had a goal to be able to run 3 miles in a typical run and even race the occasional 5k just fer shits-n-giggles. So I ran my 5k, was slow, but I wasn't last...and ever since then I've been training and have completed more 5ks (none this year, though...don't particularly like them), 10ks, 15k, 10 milers, HM, and a 25k. Now my shortest run is rarely less than 4 miles. k

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      va


        There is a difference between "working out" and "training", but one is not really any "better" than the other. Some people just run for fitness (i.e., they are just "working out") and are not "training" for anything (e.g., they may be at their target weight, raced all of the races they want to race, ...).
        Ed4


        Barefoot and happy

          I think the real distinction is whether running is "work" or "play" for you. If you're only doing it because you think you should, it will always be very difficult to stay on track. I can't think of anyone I know who stuck with an exercise regime that they considered work. But play is something you do because you enjoy it. Once running becomes play, you're a real runner who's likely to stick with it and succeed.
          Curious about running barefoot? Visit the new barefoot running group.


          My Little Pal

            I know the feeling Dave. It's wordplay I know, but when I'm in "race mode", I'm usually doing a structured training plan of some sorts. When I'm not racing and just running to maintain weight and CV health, I consider it working out. I'll be in Philly as well, doing the 26.2. It's going to be a fun run for me as I'm taking a PR shot in Louisville on 10/21. 3:22 is my time to beat. Then, I'll race the half-marathon at Marshall University on 11/04. I hope to meet several forum friends while it Philly.
            At the end of the day, be happy with where you are and what you've accomplished.


            2008 Philly Trifecta

              I know the feeling Dave. It's wordplay I know, but when I'm in "race mode", I'm usually doing a structured training plan of some sorts. When I'm not racing and just running to maintain weight and CV health, I consider it working out. I'll be in Philly as well, doing the 26.2. It's going to be a fun run for me as I'm taking a PR shot in Louisville on 10/21. 3:22 is my time to beat. Then, I'll race the half-marathon at Marshall University on 11/04. I hope to meet several forum friends while it Philly.
              Raymond I wish you all the best!! Dave

              ***Check out my site: where I've been, and where I'm going @ releasetherunner.blogspot.com
              2008 Philly Trifecta:
              10 Mile Broad St Run-5/4
              Philly Distance Run HM-9/21
              Philly Marathon-11/23
              "A goal not written down is only a dream...!"


              Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                "The difference between a runner and a jogger is an entry blank," said George Sheehan. I use that as my simple way of differentiating between the terms. I don't really differentiate between working out and training and will use them interchangably; my off season only lasts for a couple of months and that time is spent lifting weights and swimming to get the body recuperated enough for another long running season.

                Run to Win
                24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



                  "The difference between a runner and a jogger is an entry blank," said George Sheehan.
                  I'm not familiar with George Sheehan, but that's a classic. I've always considered myself a jogger, to differentiate my efforts from real (or elite) runners. Guess a change is in order.

                  E.J.
                  Greater Lowell Road Runners
                  Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

                  May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

                    You can't tell a runner from a jogger by finish time. When I was in highschool I ran track for a really good team--we went like 30 years without losing a dual meet. Our coach considered the 400m to be the ultimate equalizer race in that it hurt equally bad for everyone if you ran it full out. So he had a rule that at some point during the season every track man (2 milers, long jumpers, pole vaulters, shot putters--everyone) had to run the 400 in a real race. All of us runners who didn't specialize in the 400 would meet the requirement by running a relay leg at some point or another during the season but in the last couple of home dual meets there would always be a flood of guys trying to get in their 400. So there would be 3, sometimes 4 "JV" heats of the 400 after the varsity heat. Most of the non-runners wouldn't take it really seriously, they'd jog their 400 in trainers and make it look like they were running hard or whatever. But the guys I always admired were the ones who were clearly not built for the 400 (we're talking 250 lb offensive linemen on the football team who threw the shot or discuss during track season to stay in shape) who did give it an honest go. A couple of these guys would take the time to learn how to start in block, try to figure out how to pace a 400, borrow a pair of sprinters spikes--the whole nine. I'm sure I've mentioned it before on this board but to me there is no more clear evidence of the fact that some people are just born competitors than seeing a giant shotputter, his pudgy feet busting out of a pair of borrowed spikes, absolutely gutting it out down the home stretch, doing everything humanly possible not to finish DFL in the 2nd or 3rd JV heat against a bunch of skinny freshman and sophomore runners. Pure beauty.

                    Runners run.