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Being your own coach (Read 786 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    Non-runners want to talk about running as much as your co-workers want to see pictures of your kids or hear all about your vacation. Not.
    Ha, funny thing...my hubby's aunt and uncle are major runners--he has run Western States at least once. In the past I have never had anything in common with them, but when we were all together during the days surruonding my FIL's memorial service the 3 of us chatted quite a bit about running, gear, races, etc. Strange how our relationship with family members can change when sports are involved. Smile k

    I shoot pretty things! ~

    '14 Goals:

    • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      Isn't it great when you connect with other runners? I have a sales rep who I've know for years but, just discovered recently we're both runners. We must've rambled on for about 45 minutes about training, trail racing, & gear. So refreshing to talk to somebody who can relate to your level of enthusiasm for this sport. Anytime I talk about running with my wife & daughter they look at me like I'm a dancing bear. Actually I get that look a lot. Maybe it's not just the running...

      The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made.

        How many of you have generally had BAD coaching experiences? How many of you have had GOOD ones? Would you ever consider coaching/assistant coaching (or just volunteering to help out) with a high-school running (XC or track) team?
        The only running coaches I ever had were good ones. My H.S. track coach is a legend--he didn't lose a dual meet for 30 years. I was there for years 14-17 of "the streak." I didn't always get along with him but that was more my issue than his--I mentioned being somewhat uncoachable before--but he remains probably in the top 5 of people who have had the greatest influence on my life as a whole. All the assistant coaches we had were good too and the few club coaches I've had have all been good ones--one was even a hall-of-famer who once coached Olympians and Boston/New York marathon champions. So I can't complain at all about the coaching I have had. If I had the time and my schedule allowed, I would definitively consider coaching at the H.S. level.

        Runners run.

          I had great cross country and track coaches back in high school. When I started running again, I originally signed up for a half marathon training program through our local Road Runners club. The beginner coaches were great. Knowlegeable, inspirational and a lot of fun too. Smile Just what I needed to get me going. I like being my own coach now though. Wink I'm one of those people that's always researching and reading everything I can get my hands on about running. LOL! I'm always tweaking my training schedule and have been planning out a new schedule for dh to get back up to speed after his injury. I've been looking forward to participating in the HM training program again this year, mostly for the social aspects. I thought this year during the training program I'd work with the intermediate group and try to work a little more on speed this time around. But I got a call from my old Beginners group coach the other day asking if I'd be interested in helping her coach the beginning half marathon group this year. Shocked It's kind of cool to get a little recognition of all the hard work I've put in this year. I went from a 15+ minute mile pace on a one mile run to an 8 minute pace for a 5K. The past few races I've run, I've finished in the pack with my coaches. It was kind of funny to see their reactions because most of the summer I ran alone and raced mostly out of town. LOL! I'd also already planned to coach the youth program our club puts on every summer. Last year I went and ran with the kids but didn't really feel *capable* of telling anyone else what to do. (Even if they were only 7 yo! LOL!) It should be an interesting eceperience one way or the other! Teresa
            I definitely have mixed feelings on this one. On the one hand, I absolutely love setting my own schedule and knowing that I can alter it as I see fit. I loved that when I went for a long run over thanksgiving at my parents' house, I was able to completely alter a route (apparently, the busiest road in their town has no sidewalks!!- talk about scary!) and not have to wait or talk to someone else and make sure it was ok. I love the solitude of running- just me, my thoughts, and my music (which if I'm alone on a road, I WILL sing out loud and dance/run to). On the other hand, sometimes I feel really annoyed at not having a "team." No one I know runs. When I finally ran my first 12 miles, I was so excited and ran home to call my boyfriend and tell him. His response: "Great! But didn't you just run 10 the week before? That's just 2 more miles, right?" Non-runners just don't understand. I already got in a slight argument with my mom when she wanted to pick me up this weekend at 10 am and I asked for her to get me at 11 so I had time to shower after my planned 10 miles. Why can't I just reschedule my run? I guess I just want someone around who I can talk to about this and who understands the incredible toll long distance running can take on your body. Just because I ran 12 miles yesterday, doesn't mean I can magically run 15 tomorrow.
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