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Any good Half Marathon / 10K books for advanced runners? (Read 1351 times)


Black-Toe-Nailed

    To the OP: if you ran a 30' 10k at age 47, this would be very close to a world record for your age group. By the time you were fit enough to run a world record, you would be at least 55, and this sort of time would be well beyond the world record for 55 year olds. So, yeah, be ambitious, but I think that you ought to be careful not to get ahead of yourself.

     

    A 1:15 half marathon is more possible for you, but this would be something that would likely take 5 or 6 years of focused and disciplined training at a very high level to achieve.

     

     

     

    Upps, yeah... well... shit happens when you write while working. My goal is actually a sub *40* 10K and as close to 35 as possible (this can be 39, I don't really care). Of course... if I were able to do 30 (or close to) in a 10K I wouldn't be working in IT right now but have a big fat sponsor, ROFL Regarding the 1:15 on a half: I am doing 1:30 training right now, on trail and with some hills. And my training is not specific for this distance. My actual time on 10K is 42:28 so that I don't think it would be a problem (I have done a 40Tight lippedx on trail and training, but it does not count), maybe not this year (as I am going to go for a PR in 10K) but maybe next year AND if I don't decide to skip a year of training and jump directly into my main goal: Ultras. In any case: The result is not really important, the process is what I enjoy, the planning, the investigation and the physical work.

    --

    "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
    then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
    I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

    Emil Zatopek


    A Saucy Wench

      Do advanced runners need books?

       Advanced bookies have runners, so why not the inverse. 

      I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

       

      "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

      xor


        is over of equals percent over one hundred

         

          Regarding the 1:15 on a half: I am doing 1:30 training right now, on trail and with some hills. And my training is not specific for this distance. My actual time on 10K is 42:28 so that I don't think it would be a problem.

           

          Oh dang I misread. 1:30 is definitely possible for you. Whoops. 


          MoBramExam

            If you run a 1:15:00 HM, I want to buy YOUR book.

             

            Until then: Healthy Intelligent Training - Keith Livingstone

             



              At the advice of some others on a different thread, I've recently picked up Run Faster from the 5K to the Marathon by Brad Hudson and Matt Fitzgerald.

               

              While I'm still going through it, I think it's safe to add my name to the others that have recommended it.

               

              The authors do a good job of breaking down various considerations that need to be taken into account when coaching one's self.

               

              And as the title espouses, it covers all race distances and offers training plan schedules for each distance. These are to be used as a framework and adapted per each individuals needs, again, the book explains how to better understand what your body is telling you.

               

              For myself, I foresee a fair bit of time before I'm able to fully implement the many different pieces, but it's given me a starting place and a lot to consider.

               

              I'm working through this book right now and putting together a new HM plan. I'll be pushing my weekly workouts slowly into 60mpw territory, and this seems to lay out a good template for getting that done while staying healthy.


              HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                What about the 100 meter and 100 mile?  I'm thinking about trying to hold age group American records in both simultaneously.  

                 

                For the 100 mile, you can just carry the book with you and read it on the way, right?

                 

                (PS: By the way, I think the original poster's question/thread topic is an interesting one, and I apologize if I've distracted too much.)

                It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                xor


                  My sincere answer is: ditto Hudson.  julia1971 would tell you poo on Hudson and get Daniels.  (I always thought Glover's Competitive Runner book was a good one too)

                   

                  For the most part, you read enough books and you will see that lots shake(s) out to be similar at a conceptual level.  Which goes back to my not-totally-insincere-but-not-helpful response about advanced runners and books.

                   

                    It's not a book but it is a great tool to know what realistic goals are. http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/index.php/site/calculator
                      It's not a book but it is a great tool to know what realistic goals are. http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/index.php/site/calculator

                      For an exercise physiology summary and training plan development, his Running University is a great resource, too.

                      “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                      Julia1971


                        My sincere answer is: ditto Hudson.  julia1971 would tell you poo on Hudson and get Daniels.  (I always thought Glover's Competitive Runner book was a good one too)

                         

                        For the most part, you read enough books and you will see that lots shake(s) out to be similar at a conceptual level.  Which goes back to my not-totally-insincere-but-not-helpful response about advanced runners and books.

                         

                        I've pulled it off the shelf and am giving it another shot based on you and Jeff's (?) recommendation.  Maybe it's the format of the book that's causing me problems.  I don't know.

                         

                        Glover's books were the first I read.  I bought the Runner's Handbook and the Competitive Runner's Handbook.  Both were very good, I think, of covering just about everything you want to know about running from training plans to things like running in cold/heat.

                         

                        And, I also think you're right that a lot of authors/coaches seem to borrow/build from one another.  So, there are a lot of principles that repeat.

                        You're too strong not to keep on keepin' on. - The Pips
                        Yes, I am! - Gladys Knight

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