12

Should every race be raced? (Read 377 times)

    Well, I ran the first of the 10ks last night and came home with a PR I am more than happy with: 45:13 (compared with previous PR of 46:25). I'm happy not only because I got the PR, but because I now know I have more to give! You were right, guys. Thanks. I mean it.

     

    Last night's race was hilly and HOT. The race in 2 weeks will be flat, and mainly in shaded woodland so conditions should be more favourable. A PR closer to 44 mins should be within my capabilities, all being well.

     

    Last night was great. For most of the race I kept swapping places with someone from my running club whom I could not believe was running at my pace. 'He must have been working out like Clark Kent in Superman II' I was thinking. With 2k to go he overtook me quite decisively which caused me a bit of psychological trouble. I'm sorry to say I almost let him go. In fact I gave him every opportunity to 'go', thinking that I would save myself for the next race. But 'go' he didn't. So after his decisive move I ended up reeling him back in (my body couldn't help it; neither could his, I guess). And with 100m to the finish line I kicked and he couldn't respond. I nearly died at the line and felt fantastic. Only after 5 minutes of gasping for air, hands on knees, did I turn round and see that my fellow competitor was in fact a complete stranger (but not any more) and not whom I thought he was at all.

     

    How could you not race a race?

    Never been to the Americas, but how many of you guys have ever been to Derby?

     

    jimmyb


      Social/training racing is totally cool. I've gone to races and used them as training just to get out there with other runners. Although, on occasion, the competitiveness rears its beautiful head and I end up running harder than planned. You could run the first 10k at cruise interval level and be recovered for the second. Most fit people can recover fully in a week after a hard 10k. I know runners who race every week and haven't a problem. If there are two weeks between races, you could race both all-out. It's not like back-to-back marathons.

      Log    PRs

        How could you not race a race?

         

        +1000.  That's what I'm talkin' 'bout!  Big grin

         

        Congratulations and good luck on PR, phase 2.

        - Joe

        We are fragile creatures on collision with our judgment day.

          Ran second 10k last Friday evening. Was a SLOW 46+ mins. I put this down to the heatwave, a degree of over indulgence in wine in the days prior to the race, and a touch of hubris. Bit of a knock back, obviously, but perhaps I had it coming. It's a shame because that course is so damned flat - it's PR city.

          There's another 10k coming up Friday week. A bit hilly, but we'll see how that one goes...

          Never been to the Americas, but how many of you guys have ever been to Derby?

           

            Social/training racing is totally cool. I've gone to races and used them as training just to get out there with other runners. Although, on occasion, the competitiveness rears its beautiful head and I end up running harder than planned. You could run the first 10k at cruise interval level and be recovered for the second. Most fit people can recover fully in a week after a hard 10k. I know runners who race every week and haven't a problem. If there are two weeks between races, you could race both all-out. It's not like back-to-back marathons.

             

            To your point, here is an article that appeared in RT a few months back.

             

            I've found success using half marathons as rhythm efforts, running controlled at my projected marathon pace. I've also used full marathons in my marathon-specific period as long resistance runs or progression runs (gradually increasing speed throughout the run). I give myself up to three recovery days between each of these "quality" sessions. Through experience I've learned that this is my optimal recovery time.

            "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus


            Running Guru

              Probably not a big deal what you do in a 10K a fortnight before, it will be what you do all those "fortdays" in between that will determine how fresh you will be.

               

              This

              Visit my blog:

              The Running Father

               

              PR's - 5K - 20:47 (2013) | 10K - 45:23 (2013)  | 13.1 - 1:53:44 (2013)  | 26.2 - N/A

               

              2013 Goals - 1500 kms (897.22kms July'13) | sub20 5k | sub 45 10K  | sub 1:45 13.1 | 

               

              2013

              Flatout 5k - 4/14/13 - 23:23

              Tely 10(miles) - 7/28/13 - 1:14:46 PR

               

              Up Next:

              Provincial 5k - 9/8/13

              Mudd Immortal 5k - 9/21/13

              Coleman's Half Marathon - 10/6/13

              Cape to Cabot 20k - 10/20/13

              Hipfan


              Proud Calgarian

                The way my coach puts it: Every race has to serve a purpose.

                2014 Goals and PRs:

                5k - 17:59 (18:17);  10k - 37:00 (36:42);   HM - 1:21:59 (1:24:21);   FM - whatever (3:05:46)

                12