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Jeff Galloway training (Read 931 times)

    I'm am experienced runner. Looking for feedback. If anyone used this training for races 5k to 1/2 marathons. Did your times improve?? How did feel about the program?? etc...
    shyrunner07


      i can't really help you out much on this one. I do listen to some of his workouts that he does for Podfitness, which i really like.... I've seen his programs for various races which seem pretty similar to hal higdon (currently using HH's half mara. routine, again, which i like)....I'm new to running, so i can't say whether my times are improving by following JG or HH, or if it's just steady working out that helps (prob. a good mix of both Tongue)...
        I'm probably going to regret admitting this, but yes I use Galloway's method. In a way I don't feel like a "real" runner, because every six minutes I hit the breakdown lane for sixty seconds of walking. On the other hand, I do enjoy finishing ahead of a good percentage of "real" runners on race day. I ran the Loco Moose 5K in Hollis NH this morning, and I had a pretty good kick at the end while most other runners were dragging. It's the only reason I tried running greater than 5K, the only reason I attemped a half marathon (and I've now completed two), and the only reason I have high hopes for finishing my first attempt at a full marathon in early November. I don't think I could ever do one of the high mileage marathon training plans, but so far so good on Galloway's. If you look at my training log, you'll see most recorded as "intervals" but they aren't "true" intervals, they are Galloway intervals. I even use walk breaks during my Tuesday night 5K series, even though I do take some grief for them. After MANY years on the couch, I recently brought my 5K PR down to 21:16. Today was a 50% off "long" run, so I was supposed to run 8 miles. In spite of the heat and humidity, I felt great and wound up covering ten miles in total and still felt great when I was done. I've been tempted to recommend it on a couple of threads, but......

        E.J.
        Greater Lowell Road Runners
        Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

        May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

          I even use walk breaks during my Tuesday night 5K series, even though I do take some grief for them. After MANY years on the couch, I recently brought my 5K PR down to 21:16.
          Wow - just how fast are you running during your 6 minute intervals?

          Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




          Go With The Flow
          Thyroid Support Group

            Wow - just how fast are you running during your 6 minute intervals?
            I usually walk past the first mile marker at around 6:45. Usually passing the second at about 13:45. Usually finish up somewhere around 21:30+, but that night for some reason I was able to shave 15 seconds off my prior best. One thing to keep in mind, you aren't adding a minute to your final time when you walk for a minute. You might be moving at half your normal pace, but you are still heading toward the finish line so you're probably "losing" about thirty seconds. I think I get most (if not all) of that thirty seconds back over the next interval, because my legs and wind have recovered a bit. I think this is especially true for longer races, during my two half marathons I've reeled in most (but not all) of those that pass me during my walks. After reading a number of threads here, I think I might be going out a little too fast so I'm going to experiment with a slower start and pushing a bit more during the second mile.

            E.J.
            Greater Lowell Road Runners
            Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

            May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

              BBBBDawg, I felt the same way that you did when I started using Galloway's "interval" program. I followed his programs from the mid-80's to 2000, then after a two month lay-off that lasted for seven years (and added 40 pounds) I became reacquainted with his current program. At first I felt like I wasn't really running... then (call it age, or a give a s*** attitude) I stopped worrying about others and concentrated on my progress. 8 months into the program and 40 pounds lighter, I am again a Galloway disciple. I do an initial 10 minute run, then I go into a 5 minute run:1 minute walk ratio. Like you, I haven't suffered any ill effects with my times, and I feel stronger at the end. My longest run to date using this method is 14 miles, and my long run this Sunday will be 11. So far, I have hit every goal I've set. I'm currently running a 9:00 - 9:15 mile, with my next goal of reducing that to 8:30, which would be very good for me. I ran a couple of 10K's, the Broad Street 10 miler in Philadelphia in May, and I am registered for the Philadelphia Distance Run (1/2 marathon) in September. These are longer distances than I have ever run before, and other than the occasional bad day that we all have, I feel strong throughout. I found the same thing in the races I have run - I find the "core group" of runners that are at my pace, and even though they may pass me during the walks, I am right back in the pack and at times leading the pack during the run intervals. I'm at the point now where I feel that I have a fairly good base, so I plan to start some hill training and speed work once a week. Hopefully, this will help me reach my time goals. I truly enjoy my runs using Galloway's method. Woburn runner, I say check it out if you are interested. I don't think you'll be disappointed, but the worst that will happen is that you'll go back to your current program. No harm, no foul. Galloway's got my vote, though.
              "You can't have everything. Where would you put it?" - Steven Wright
                Here I sit with my copy of Galloway's Book on Running on the shelf right next to my computer; the same first edition copy I bought when it first hit the shelves in '84. I had been running for nearly ten years before that purchase with so-so progress, lots of pain and injuries that would sideline me for weeks. Since learning his training methods, running became brand new for me, and it is because of its sensibleness that I've been able to run well into my 50's without significant injury. At at 50 (4 years ago) I was diagnosed with adult onset diabetes - type 1 for grown ups. My running had tanked the year or two before because of the disease. Having gotten my sugar under control (and with my docs blessin), last year I began training again after 4 years of nothing but casual walking. My training was strickly Galloway. Started Memorial Day and by mid-August my son and I did a half-marathon in under 2 hours. I swear by Galloway's training methods and I am old enough to not care much what others think. Yes

                Discipline is never an end in itself, only a means to an end. (RF)


                My Little Pal

                  After the St. Louis Marathon in October of '00, I stopped running until the summer of 2002. In mid June, I weighed in at 220+ and decided I could lose weight and be ready for the Indianapolis Marathon on 10/17/2002. I used a Gallowayesque method of training in minimizing my week day runs and stressing the long run. While on long runs, I walked for about 20-30 seconds at 3:00, 6:00, and the end of every mile. In the 15 weeks I had to prepare, I only ran 367 miles, lost 30 pounds, and ran a 4:15:13 at Indy.
                  At the end of the day, be happy with where you are and what you've accomplished.