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Do You Have To Love Running To Run A Marathon (Read 337 times)

mab411


Proboscis Colossus


    If you train to do a marathon ~ The accomplishment is in the journey of training, the race is just the victory lap.

     

    Enjoy the journey!

     

    Beat me to it!  I'll be running my sixth this Sunday, gunning for a PR, but truth be told, if I don't get it or if I hit the wall or whatever, it won't be that traumatic for me.  This training cycle has been a lot of fun, and I'm just looking forward to seeing how it's affected my fitness!

     

    My enjoyment of the day itself will come from the camaraderie, the family time, and just being out on the course for that long.

    "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

      GinnyinPA -  I hiked a couple sections of the Pacific Crest Trail over the 2012 summer and logged about 250+ miles on the trail over 2 1/2 weeks.  On my last day I hiked 26 miles to my destination and had this wierd thought..... If I could hike 26 miles with a 45 pound pack and crazy elevations then I could run a marathon.  It wasn't EXACTLY like this but pretty much so.

      Anyways before 8 months ago, I would never have thought of myself as a runner.  I thought running was boring, runners were lame, and just never thought of long distance running.  I had only ran in a track meet twice in my life and that was in 4th grade. I wasn't even on the track team.

      Anyways my first race as an adult was a marathon in Dec 2012. I loved every minute of it, and loved the training and pain even more.  I think runners are cool now and I can feel the strength and love of the community.  So I dont think you need to LOVE running to do a marathon, but you may love it afterwards Smile   watch out!!

       

      p.s.  I still think cyclers are lame and I hate their tight techie outfits.  Sorry if I offend anyone but they just seem like they are SOOO elite in their spandex and name brand clothes which they think makes them faster.....Funny thing is, I end up running the same speed or faster than some of these Lance Armstrong Jr.s  Then I notice them pushing hard to get ahead of "that runner" LOL

        5k  = 19.48 10/1/13

      10k  = 45.28 4/16/13

      Half Marathon = 1:38.53  Summer Sizzle 7/13/14

      Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/12  4:39.11

      Solo O Marathon 06/02/13  3:52:10

      Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/13 3:40.34

        It seems as if your question within the title of the thread is different than the theme of your post.

        To me, "love running" is the desire to do so each and every day (or having it a part of your lifestyle).  It seems as if you're there now based on looking at your log and seeing your response post.  It seems like the answer to that is Yes.

         

        The theme of your post seems to be clarified in your response post: "Does running a marathon validate me as a runner?".  It seems that the answer to that would be No.

         

        For me, I ran for about 10 years as an adult before I raced my first race.  A "race" didn't validate me as a runner.  After 10 years, though, I did run a race, and realized that I enjoyed it, and was also humbled by it.  At that time, I chose to push my limits and have done most race distances.  Most of the race distances I've only done 1 time.

        distance # races
        5k 3
        10k 1
        half marathon 4
        marathon 1
        sprint triathlon +/-10
        olympic tri 1
        1/2 Ironman 1
        Ironman 1

         

        For me, the enjoyment is the active lifestyle, and not the race.

        For you, the enjoyment may be whatever you choose.  A marathon doesn't need to be part of "validating yourself".  I'm hoping you love being active, though.

        2014 Goals:

        #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

        #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

         

          When I ran my first marathon, I didn't love running. But I had taken it up as a way of getting exercise and spending time with my husband and was starting to like it. I decided to train for a marathon mostly because I wanted the experience of setting a long range goal, developing a plan, having the discipline to follow through when I didn't feel like it at times, feeling that I was improving in something, and achieving a very difficult personal accomplishment. I had just started graduate school and it was a kind of metaphor for what I was doing with my life at that time. People set all kinds of running goals for themselves and often times get more out of running a marathon than simply being able to run 26.2 miles.

          2014 goals

          1800 miles; 5k < 25:00; 10k < 53:00HM < 2:00

           

          Upcoming:

          NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21; Newport Liberty HM 9/2; Trenton Half Marathon 10/8


          Sultan of slug

            Regarding disliking long runs: I think I know what you mean. When I go for a long period without doing many/any long runs, it's quite a shock to try to get back into them. Long-distance running is a mind game, and I get bad at that game when I'm out of practice. I run two miles and think, "WTF still 16 to go?!"

             

            But for me at least, I just have to keep at it. After a few weeks of higher mileage and regular long runs, my mind becomes trained - less restless, more able to stay in the moment, zone out, and just go with the flow. After about 10 miles I'm able to enter a zen-like state in which I am convinced that I can keep running forever. (This usually goes away several miles later....)

             

            So don't let your current dislike of long runs discourage you yet. Try to get into a routine of doing them once a week (with a medium-long run in the middle of the week), and you very well find yourself undergoing a mental transformation that enables you to keep at it - and even enjoy it!

            DoppleBock


              I still remember the 1st time I ran

              13

              14

              16

              17

              21

              Miles - Each was tramatic.  I would nap for at least an hour after, completely exhausted.  The issues I encountered when I started to run longer than 8-10 miles:

               

              Hydration ~ 2 ways:  1)  I had to be fully hydrated (Or at least be much better at it) at the start of runs and 2)  Hydration duing runs ~ I broke down and bough a camelback and this made it much easier ~ dehydration can make the long run much harder than it has to be.

               

              Pace ~ I ran my long runs at too fast of a pace in the 1st 1/2 of the run and I paid for it the 2nd

               

              Nutrition:  If your everyday nutrition (Including gettin enough quality carbs) is not great, you can get away with 10 miles and feel good, things started to go downhill for me after that.

               

              Boredom ~ If you are just bored, maybe you need to find a more beautiful route.

               

              Final thought ~ It is hard as heck to gain a level of fitness.  Running each of these distances generally got easier each time I did them.  Now I have run 18-22 miles so many times that if I do it at an easy pace, it is not physically demanding.

              http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

              2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

               

                PoeDogRuns

                 

                Do you have to love runnilng to run a marathon?  of course not but it would really make the work/training much more enjoyable!

                 

                as one poster already mentioned the issue really seems to be about 2 things here:  1. does a person have to run a marathon to be validated as a runner?   again the answer is of course not!  you have already validated yourself as a runner.

                 

                2. for some reason you have lots of apprenhension re: your long runs.   I think most runners can relate to this as we all have days like that & sometimes go through funks. it can be mentally draining.  I peeked at your log & you & I have similar daily runs/weekly mileage.  avg 4-6 daily with weekly LR's of 10-12.  only difference is you run every day & this year I made a decision to have at least one "mandatory" day off. otherwise our weekly mileage would be pretty much the same.   I have a 5k June 2 & after that will be tweeking my weekly training slightly to gear up for a sept 15k & HM two weeks later.    2 things will be doing different.  1)  stretching out one of my weekly runs from around 6 miles t0 8-10 & with some quality built in.  2).  my sunday LR will be alternating weekly runs between 10-12 with some quality & following week 12-14 (no longer than 15) & slow/easy.  would something like this help you to not dread your LR's so much?   this is my HM plan & obviously if you decide to run a marathon you would be building up your mileage accordingly.

                 

                I have felt for most of this year that I have needed a weekly run that fills the big gap between my normal daily runs & my LR but been difficult because of work schedule.    beginning June will just find a way to get it done.

                DoppleBock


                  PS

                   

                  Depending on your speed ~ A 20 mile run may be too long.

                   

                  A 2 hour run is a reasonable effort and provides a good training stress

                   

                  A lot of my long runs have traditionally been 8 minute mile pace.  2:40 - 3 hours starts hitting the body much harder with stress, breaking it down.

                   

                  I would think in terms of time and not a slave to mileage.  If you do runs 2 - 2.5 hours you will be prepared to complete your 1st marathon.

                  http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                  2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                   

                  DoppleBock


                    The marathon is my favorite race distance.  I can race it in any shape and I find it the most satisfying.  The cerebral challenge of knowing what shape you are in and picking an early pace that will maximize your performance.  The constant monitoring of your effort level to keep it right on the red line and not over and then the physical challenge later in the race to over come pain and discomfort.

                     

                    It is the race distance that many other factors than speed come into play.  Glycogen depletion, dehydration, endurance and pure stubborness (And other) factors have to be in balance with pacing and speed (genetic)

                    http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                    2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                     


                    I'm back!

                      The marathon is my favorite race distance.  I can race it in any shape and I find it the most satisfying.  The cerebral challenge of knowing what shape you are in and picking an early pace that will maximize your performance.  The constant monitoring of your effort level to keep it right on the red line and not over and then the physical challenge later in the race to over come pain and discomfort.

                       

                      It is the race distance that many other factors than speed come into play.  Glycogen depletion, dehydration, endurance and pure stubborness (And other) factors have to be in balance with pacing and speed (genetic)

                       

                      +1, well said.


                      Driver, Runner, Bestie

                        I appreciate all the responses.  I think I am quite intimidated by the long runs.  My easy pace hovers around 11 miles per minute.  Running 20 miles at that speed will eat up an enormous amount of a day.  I know this mileage is not the typical weekend run, but with increased long runs, the effort and time commitment becomes a reality.  I worry that just a 2.5 hour run will not quite get me marathon ready given my slow speed.  I worry about boredom.  I worry about not spending enough time quality time with the kids and husband.  I worry about failure. I worry about being the last runner crossing the finish line after 6 hours or more.  Geez.

                         

                        My plan is to try to increase the long run miles on the weekend and get a mid week longer run into the mix.  See how things are going through May.  If it is ok and I have a little bit of sanity left, then pull the trigger on signing up for a fall race.

                         

                        I know I will continue with the daily bread and butter runs of 4 to 6 miles.  I love those miles and that time I am running them.

                         

                        Again, thanks so much for the time and consideration you have given me with your insights and experience.  This is a great community.


                        The Irreverent Reverand

                          I don't love running, either. I could be pretty content being fat and happy, eating crap and not getting up at 4:30am a few morning a week.

                           

                          But, I do like what running does for me, and I do like racing, and I do like the sense of accomplishment that comes with training for months for a few lousy races I have no chance of winning or even being "competitive."

                           

                          The time commitment is huge. Get up at 4:30, run for a few hours, and then come home and wake up your kids.  Get support from your spouse to take the time to run the long runs.  Run with somebody. Or don't (I usually don't). Run with an iPod. Or don't (I don't - there's plenty to stimulate me along the way, and I like the solitude, too). It takes a ton of work, and you've got to carve out the time and make the commitment, but it is fulfilling ... especially if you have the desire to do it, which it sounds like you do.

                          Husband. Father of three. Lutheran pastor. National Guardsman. Runner. Political junkie. Baseball fan.

                           

                          Goals for 2014:

                          Sub-3:30 marathon; run for a year free from major injuries or interruptions

                          PRs: 3:27 marathon; 1:41 half; 45:07 10K; 23:26 5K; 6:02 mile; <12 parsecs Kessel Run

                            I appreciate all the responses.  I think I am quite intimidated by the long runs.  My easy pace hovers around 11 miles per minute.  Running 20 miles at that speed will eat up an enormous amount of a day.  I know this mileage is not the typical weekend run, but with increased long runs, the effort and time commitment becomes a reality.  I worry that just a 2.5 hour run will not quite get me marathon ready given my slow speed.  I worry about boredom.  I worry about not spending enough time quality time with the kids and husband.  I worry about failure. I worry about being the last runner crossing the finish line after 6 hours or more.  Geez.

                             

                            I get the feeling that guilt may account for your not enjoying the long runs.  In your OP you said you would like to make the commitment to run, that is, train for, a marathon.  I think what you really need is the permission/blessing to do this from your husband and kids.  Have you sat down with them and explained that this is something you would like to do for yourself, but it would be a larger time commitment for you?  If they're on board and supportive, I bet you can start to feel the freedom to really enjoy your long runs.  Good luck!

                            Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.


                            Brains aint me forte

                               

                              I get the feeling that guilt may account for your not enjoying the long runs.  In your OP you said you would like to make the commitment to run, that is, train for, a marathon.  I think what you really need is the permission/blessing to do this from your husband and kids.  Have you sat down with them and explained that this is something you would like to do for yourself, but it would be a larger time commitment for you?  If they're on board and supportive, I bet you can start to feel the freedom to really enjoy your long runs.  Good luck!

                               

                              A big +1 to this.  I talked about running a marathon for a long time but the thought of spending that much time away from my family on something that is just "all about me" made me hesitate a lot.  I probably would have never run my first if my wife hadn't encouraged me to do it even after I talked to her about the amount of time I would need to devote to it.  She was incredibly supportive of me through the whole thing both times (I've run two now) and that means a lot to me.

                               "Address the process rather than the outcome.
                              Then, the outcome becomes more likely." - Robert Fripp

                              DoppleBock


                                My longest run before I did a 50 mile 7 hour 50 minute trail race was a marathon and the most time I had run was under 3 1/2 hours.  Yet the 50 mile race was very doable.

                                 

                                Maybe do 1 run near 3 hours - But the key will be more in your pacing and patients than in the fact that you had done longer runs.  If you are an 11 minute per mile person, I would even plan on walking through aide stations (basically 1-2 minute walk).  I think you are looking for an experience in that is for completion / accomplishment of distance.  If you slow down and walk through aide stations and end up taking an extra 15 minutes to finish versus an experience in pain and agony with 15 minute faster time you will hit your goal and enjoy the experience.

                                 

                                I stronly believe if you were to do a marathon right now - But take it easy as I described above (After a taper to get you well rested) you would finish just fine.  Do not underestimate the power of being rested (tapered) and the power you possess.  Believe in yourself and do not be intimidated by the distance.

                                 

                                It is better off to go into a marathon healthy and a but undertrained for the distance, then all beat up (Mentally and physically) because you stubbornly insist to run too long in training.

                                 

                                So my advice is to slow down even a bit more on your long runs or take a little walk break (2 minutes) every 30 minutes - Let's say you average 12 minute miles doing this - Run 3 hours = 15 miles.

                                 

                                If you went to marathons and watched all the people lesser trained than you - Will themselves to finish - You would be much more confident.

                                 

                                Good luck

                                 

                                I appreciate all the responses.  I think I am quite intimidated by the long runs.  My easy pace hovers around 11 miles per minute.  Running 20 miles at that speed will eat up an enormous amount of a day.  I know this mileage is not the typical weekend run, but with increased long runs, the effort and time commitment becomes a reality.  I worry that just a 2.5 hour run will not quite get me marathon ready given my slow speed.  I worry about boredom.  I worry about not spending enough time quality time with the kids and husband.  I worry about failure. I worry about being the last runner crossing the finish line after 6 hours or more.  Geez.

                                 

                                My plan is to try to increase the long run miles on the weekend and get a mid week longer run into the mix.  See how things are going through May.  If it is ok and I have a little bit of sanity left, then pull the trigger on signing up for a fall race.

                                 

                                I know I will continue with the daily bread and butter runs of 4 to 6 miles.  I love those miles and that time I am running them.

                                 

                                Again, thanks so much for the time and consideration you have given me with your insights and experience.  This is a great community.

                                http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                                2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                                 

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