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The very last sentence seems KEY... (Read 635 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    I shoot pretty things! ~

    '14 Goals:

    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


    I've got a fever...

      “There’s no substitute for hard work and just getting out and doing the miles.”
      Yep.

      On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

        I'd agree. Can't be said much better then that.
        "Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty, and well preserved body, but rather, to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: "WOW... WHAT A RIDE!!!" Muskingum College XC
        Scout7


        CPT Curmudgeon

          What's sad, though, is that the most useful line is buried at the end of the article.


          Needs more cowbell!

            What's sad, though, is that the most useful line is buried at the end of the article.
            Yeah, I had that thought, as well. If someone just skims the first page they miss the real heart of what's crucial. As I told my friend who sent the link (a HS buddy who ran track with me) I think the major factors have kept me from anything more than minor, nagging aches and such (as opposed to being truly sidelined with serious injury) since I started running a year ago is simply being cautious and gradual with my mileage increases and taking it easier when I do have issues. That, and luck. k

            I shoot pretty things! ~

            '14 Goals:

            • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


            I've got a fever...

              What the article doesn't seem to address (unless I missed it) are the root causes of those common running injuries. ZZ, you hit on a good point when you said:
              simply being cautious and gradual with my mileage increases and taking it easier when I do have issues
              How many running injuries are the result of poor bio-mechanics vs. Overuse/overdoing it doing too much too fast large increases in training (ignoring the 10% rule) not building a good enough base before doing speedwork too many miles on a pair of shoes (BTTD -- 1000+ miles = stress fracture) wrong shoe type for your foot wearing crunchy 9-year old racing flats for your first race in several years (BTTD -- sore foot for weeks) etc. I'm sure bio-mechanics and form contribute to a large number of injuries, but I'll bet the lion's share of them come from the things above that we do to ourselves. However, I'd love to hear from any RA'ers who have made form changes and seen dramatic improvements in their running performance and/or injury level.

              On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


              Needs more cowbell!

                What the article doesn't seem to address (unless I missed it) are the root causes of those common running injuries. ZZ, you hit on a good point when you said: How many running injuries are the result of poor bio-mechanics vs. Overuse/overdoing it doing too much too fast large increases in training (ignoring the 10% rule) not building a good enough base before doing speedwork too many miles on a pair of shoes (BTTD -- 1000+ miles = stress fracture) wrong shoe type for your foot wearing crunchy 9-year old racing flats for your first race in several years (BTTD -- sore foot for weeks) etc. I'm sure bio-mechanics and form contribute to a large number of injuries, but I'll bet the lion's share of them come from the things above that we do to ourselves.
                Ask backroadrunner about this. When she first started running she ended up with stress fractures in both legs. Then she has a habit of trying to "make up for lost time" as soon as she is cleared to run again. I think she has finally realized what a disasterous cycle this sets up. I probably replace my shoes more often than most runners, but when I have a string of painful runs and there's no other obvious reason for it (ie increased mileage, not enough rest, etc.) I get a new pair. So far that has worked. I may only get ~250 miles out of a pair of shoes, but no injuries. I also had the guy who helped me at the running store recently tell me that because of the way I drag my heels a bit when I run that I am wearing my shoes in a way that is eating up their stability prematurely. k

                I shoot pretty things! ~

                '14 Goals:

                • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                Scout7


                CPT Curmudgeon

                  This has always been my standpoint with this sort of thing. The majority of these running methods promise some sort of quick fix (although they all say that it takes time). The vast majority of people out there do not have a biomechanical issue that will cause them injury. I've read "Chi Running". Here's the book in a nutshell: When you start off, run at an easy pace. Build your mileage up slowly. When you feel comfortable with things, you can start to add in other types of workouts (mostly tempo). The only differentiation is the "form" stuff. And even that is pretty accepted stuff (maintaining a straight line with your back, etc.). Hey, if it works for you, great. But I think alot of people just don't realize that it's not mysticism.