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glaucoma and running (Read 1022 times)

    I have been running for eight years and I love the positive effects it has had on me including weight loss, lower BP and an improved blood profile. I average about 25 mi per week. After a few years of elevated eye pressure, last week my opthamologist diagnosed me with glaucoma  after noticing optic nerve damage and prescribed Timolol Maleate eye drops. This is the same med presicribed to lower BP when taken orally, and a known side effect is a decreased heart rate. The questions I have:

    1. Could running have contributed to this disease in any way?

    2. Should I worry about this med further lowering my heart rate? I average about 45 - 55 BPM.

    3. Any other runners out there have glaucoma and what effect has your med had on your running?

     

    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.


    Feeling the growl again

      I have been running for eight years and I love the positive effects it has had on me including weight loss, lower BP and an improved blood profile. I average about 25 mi per week. After a few years of elevated eye pressure, last week my opthamologist diagnosed me with glaucoma  after noticing optic nerve damage and prescribed Timolol Maleate eye drops. This is the same med presicribed to lower BP when taken orally, and a known side effect is a decreased heart rate. The questions I have:

      1. Could running have contributed to this disease in any way?

      2. Should I worry about this med further lowering my heart rate? I average about 45 - 55 BPM.

      3. Any other runners out there have glaucoma and what effect has your med had on your running?

       

      Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

       

      1:  I don't see how.  If anything, better health through vigorous exercise may (MAY) help reduce buildup in blood vessels that can be one of the causes, same idea as helping with heart disease.  I'm not aware of any evidence (nor have I looked for it) supporting this theory.

       

      2:  Ask your doctor.  Remember that an oral pill introduces the medication systemically, so you get a higher dose all across your body.  By using the same drug in eye drops, it is more localized in its effects so I would theorize you would get less of a systemic effect.  But I am not personally acquainted with the action of this drug.

       

      3:  Not a question for me.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       

      Julia1971


        3.  I don't have glaucoma but my eye doctor but me on drops (Travatan) because the pressure in my eye is so high.  I haven't noticed any effect on my running but I have started being nicer to my eyes by wearing sunglasses more often.

         

        1.  My eye doctor and I talked on and on about my running.  He never mentioned any connection.

         

        2.  Ditto re asking your doctors.  When I was trying to learn more about glaucoma on the interwebs, I think I did read that people who are already on blood pressure meds should make sure both doctors know what they're taking.

         

        ETA:  On #2, I was thinking you were already on BP meds.  But  now that I re-read, you aren't but are just concerned about having BP that's too low.  Same advice, though.  I would talk to my general practioner about any concerns. 

        You're too strong not to keep on keepin' on. - The Pips
        Yes, I am! - Gladys Knight

          Shortly before I started running, the optometrist told me that my eyeball pressure was rising and that I would eventually need to go on meds for glaucoma.  A few years later, my eyeball pressure was down to the normal range and she wanted to know if I was doing something for exercise.  I told her that I was running about 30 miles per week.  "Oh, that's it" was her response. 

           

          I'm now running 40 to 45 miles per week and my eyeball pressure is normal to low normal.  No meds. 

           

          Maybe if you ran more miles? Smile

            Thanks for the responses. I plan to get more info about side effects from my ophthalmologist, optometrist and family doctor regarding glaucoma, it's medication and running. Yes, I have read that more vigorous exercise (ie. more miles) should help. In the past few years, I have run three marathons and several HM's where I increased mileage up to 40 miles per week. My eye pressure remained elevated during these high volume weeks.

            I also sweat a lot and often times I get sweat in my eyes. I have ordered the Halo headband, something I should have done long ago. I was wondering if getting salty sweat in your eyes could contribute to elevated eye pressure?

              I have narrow angles, which can lead to narrow angle glaucoma, and while it's probably not the same type of glaucoma that you have, my pressure was higher...then after running/eating better/losing weight, the IOP went down.

               

              Regardless, I had the surgery to deal with it (lasers through the iris).  Pressure is now way down.  But unless you have narrow angle, that surgery is pretty much not for you.

              Jeff


              Feeling the growl again

                 I was wondering if getting salty sweat in your eyes could contribute to elevated eye pressure?

                 

                No.

                 

                But you may find this interesting.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 

                  No.

                   

                  But you may find this interesting.

                   

                  "there were no reported cases of glaucoma for runners who could run 10K faster than 33:20!"

                   

                  But how many people over 50 can run 10K faster than 33:20?

                  Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                    "there were no reported cases of glaucoma for runners who could run 10K faster than 33:20!"

                     

                    But how many people over 50 can run 10K faster than 33:20?

                     

                    Not this 53 year old runner. Not even close.

                    What makes all the research indicating that running may reduce the risks of glaucoma, I did not discover that I had elevated intraocular pressure until after I started running and following a better lifestyle. I know that is most likely a coincidence, but is discouraging none the less.

                    I have Open Angle glaucoma, which is very slow to progress. We'll see how it goes with the medication, but I will discuss the surgery options with my doctor.

                      Not this 53 year old runner. Not even close.

                      What makes all the research indicating that running may reduce the risks of glaucoma, I did not discover that I had elevated intraocular pressure until after I started running and following a better lifestyle. I know that is most likely a coincidence, but is discouraging none the less.

                      I have Open Angle glaucoma, which is very slow to progress. We'll see how it goes with the medication, but I will discuss the surgery options with my doctor.

                       

                      Same here on all counts.  Oh, well, except the "version" of glaucoma.

                       

                      And, again, the surgery for mine was much easier, and since then, my iop is down quite nicely.

                       

                      Actually it was discovered back in '03 when I was running, then I quit running for about 6 years, and the pressure went back up.  Since I've started running again, it had gone down but I still had the surgery.

                       

                      The ophthalmologist likened it to driving 70 mph on the turnpike.  You might go the rest of your days without getting a ticket...but, you might not.

                       

                      I'm sure he also didn't have too much of a problem extracting the $1300 *per eye* from my insurance company either.

                      Jeff

                        Soon we'll be able to have things like this and won't need silly things like eyes.

                         

                        http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/132918-the-laser-powered-bionic-eye-that-gives-576-pixel-grayscale-vision-to-the-blind

                        Jeff

                          Soon we'll be able to have things like this and won't need silly things like eyes.

                           

                          http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/132918-the-laser-powered-bionic-eye-that-gives-576-pixel-grayscale-vision-to-the-blind

                          LOL- that's a scary thought!

                            LOL- that's a scary thought!

                             

                            Just like in some SF movies/books!  Think of the augmented reality possibilities!

                            Jeff