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pain on outside of foot (Read 64 times)

robbie79


    Hi,

     

    I'm new to this fourm, and am a novice runner. i just started running outside (which i love) opposed ti a treadmill. i had, well still have ITB syndrome affecting my right knee but recently bought a knee brace and the pain is gone. But most recently i pushed myself a little to hard i guess with my last run because now my outer left foot hurts. It hurts when i walk and run, but not when i bike. So my question is can i still bike and not negatively affect my foot, or should i suspend that too?

     

     

    Thanks Again!

      Hi,

       

      I'm new to this fourm, and am a novice runner. i just started running outside (which i love) opposed ti a treadmill. i had, well still have ITB syndrome affecting my right knee but recently bought a knee brace and the pain is gone. But most recently i pushed myself a little to hard i guess with my last run because now my outer left foot hurts. It hurts when i walk and run, but not when i bike. So my question is can i still bike and not negatively affect my foot, or should i suspend that too?

       

       

      Thanks Again!

       

      You don't give us much to go on, but as a general rule, if it don't hurt, it should be okay.

       

      As for running, here are a few general comments:

      • In many cases, "novice runners" typically try to run too fast for their level of conditioning, and as a result, often get hurt (ITB Syndrome is a pretty common injury).
      • The best way for a novice runner to build conditioning while avoiding injury is to slow down and run further.  Said another way, if you typically run say three miles (or thirty minutes), and you're starting to feel stronger, instead of pushing yourself to run the same distance at a faster pace, keep thing slow and run further instead.
      • Once a (not so) novice runner is up to say five to six miles (or say an  hour of running), then adding in some faster paced workouts can be done relatively safely.
      • Things to keep in mind:
        • The muscular and cardio/vascular systems develop at a relatively fast pace.
        • The skeletal, connective tissue (ligaments and tendons), and joint related systems develop at a relatively slow pace.
        • Keeping your pace slow(er), and running further, allows all of your systems to develop at relatively the same rate, thus helping to avoid injury.

        What shipo ^ said.  You don't necessarily have to abandon all activities when you have an injury, but you should cut back on the intensity and duration, and try to analyze the source of the problem.  Different shoes?  Modify your form/footstrike?  If you're running more gently, but with good form, you have a better chance of staying out of trouble while developing the strength you need.

        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

        bap


          Hi,

           

          I'm new to this fourm, and am a novice runner. i just started running outside (which i love) opposed ti a treadmill. i had, well still have ITB syndrome affecting my right knee but recently bought a knee brace and the pain is gone. But most recently i pushed myself a little to hard i guess with my last run because now my outer left foot hurts. It hurts when i walk and run, but not when i bike. So my question is can i still bike and not negatively affect my foot, or should i suspend that too?

           

           

          Thanks Again!

           

          Do you always run in the same direction?

          Age 52

          2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40