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Quite Possibly the most Eye Opening Six Minutes Ever on Film (Read 299 times)

    5k - 20:56 (09/12), 7k - 28:40 (11/12), 10k trial - 43:08  (03/13), 42:05 (05/13), FM - 3:09:28 (05/13), HM - 1:28:20 (05/14), Failed 10K trial - avg 6:10/mi for 4mi (29/08/14), FM - 3:03 (13/09/14)

    Gator eye


      Wow, those slaughter houses looked very clean and well run. And the part showing the mass milking parlor that rotated, simply genius.

      By the way the sow pigs are kept in the cages to keep them from eating there young. Pigs are nasty that way.

      I think I'm going to have a chicken sandwich for lunch.

      GC100k


        http://www.minds.com/blog/view/201538/quite-possibly-the-most-eye-opening-six-minutes-ever-on-film

         

        It is about meat production.

         

        Cool.  It's nice to see a pro-meat video showing how it's very cleanly and professionally done instead of the usual anti-meat propaganda.

          I agree, the milking process, the pig feeding process, all look clean and well run.  I agree with above poster.

           

          Humankind has been hunting, killing, and eating animals for millions of years.  I think it only recent that humans have made conscious decisions to not eat other animals.  Whether the beef or pork was hunted, killed + gutted in a woodshed, or whether it was processed and gutted in a factory, I don't see the difference.  Animal faces the same fate in that regard.

           

          I understand why some folks become vegetarians these days, but I too am not at all deterred from having a McChicken sandwich when I go out later today.  

          The Plan (big parts)→  /// April:  Hampton, VA 24 Hour Run for Cancer (PR 80 Miles) ///  Nov:  New York Marathon  ///  Dec:  Seashore State Park 50K  ///  ∞


          Feeling the growl again

             

            By the way the sow pigs are kept in the cages to keep them from eating there young. Pigs are nasty that way.

             

             

            Some of the nastier sights of my childhood were when you didn't get a sow separated and in one of those crates before they gave birth.  Not pretty.

             

            Everyone should see where their food comes from.  Especially when it comes from places like this.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             


            Interval Junkie --Nobby

              By the way the sow pigs are kept in the cages to keep them from eating there young. 

               

              Odd evolutionary 'choice'.

              2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

              Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!

              Gator eye


                Wow Spaniel, it's been my dream to see that exact same view someday.

                Nice elk.


                No Talent Drips

                    Whether the beef or pork was hunted, killed + gutted in a woodshed, or whether it was processed and gutted in a factory, I don't see the difference.  Animal faces the same fate in that regard.

                  Fer realsies? long time vegetarian here...but almost always (I mean once I could form a thought more substantial than "boob!") had a sense of the superiority (in so many ways) of meat procured from hunting as opposed to the drive through window. That sow with sores running the length of its back is not suffering the same fate as the boar that Ted Nugent takes down with his compound bow (with a really impressive shot through the trees...boar a full sprint).

                   

                  Though neither fate is particlarly appealing to me, I do hope to die quickly rathjer than a long, painful, caged death.

                   

                  Feckless.

                   

                  You should go get the clap just so you can give it to her. --beef

                    By the way the sow pigs are kept in the cages to keep them from eating there young. Pigs are nasty that way.

                    When I was in highschool, I worked my summers and weekends for a production Farrow to Finish farm.

                    I have a lot of 'bad' memories from there, but also many great memories.  I learned a lot.

                     

                    I tell my friends that my 1st job was impregnating sows.  Honestly, though, I had to enter the boar's pen after a sow was in there, and ensure that their magic wand was in the proper location.  HA!

                     

                    As it relates to the "weaning room", though.... I'd take exception to the statement saying that they would eat their young.  I've never seen it or heard of it until your post.  However, I've seen many times where a piglet would get squashed to death in the pen.  The pen is tight so that the mother does not have the freedom to stand and sit and walk around in the first few days after the piglets are born.

                     

                    We collected a lot of data.  Which boar with which sow lead to how many births per litter.  Which boar was best.... How many litters would the sow have.  How many days from birth to weaning.  Percentage of live births to survive weaning.  Days from birth to market for each pig.  Etc.

                     

                    After 21 days or so, the piglets would be weaned from their mother and go to the growing room, where they live for another 250 +/- days until they get to be 220 pounds (IIRC).
                    The week that they're 220 pounds, they go to the market to be slaughtered.

                    Yes, it's a production house, but the numbers and the math within that business were quite amazing.

                    Great 1st job for me.

                    2014 Goals:

                    #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                    #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                     


                    Feeling the growl again

                      Wow Spaniel, it's been my dream to see that exact same view someday.

                      Nice elk.

                       

                      I've been back to that same spot 3 times.  I love Montana.

                      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                       


                      Feeling the growl again

                        I'd take exception to the statement saying that they would eat their young.  I've never seen it or heard of it until your post.  However, I've seen many times where a piglet would get squashed to death in the pen. 

                         

                        The mother will flop down and squash them for 2-3 days after birth until maternal instinct develops; after that, she is fiercely defensive of them.  Hence the crate, with heating mats to the side to draw the piglets out from underneath her.

                         

                        The eating of the piglets is if the sow is not separated from other pigs before she gives birth.  If she gives birth in the group, then yes many of them were often eaten by the OTHER pigs, not the mother.

                         

                        I took a lot of value from the farm but I don't miss being around pigs.  Smile

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         

                        JustLikeJF


                          ..........

                                                                                  

                            I agree with most everyone else. These facilities are very clean and orderly. I watched the video because of the spinning milker. We have a public / educational farm near where I live, which is kept in nearly prestine condition, and it has a rotating milker. It is interesting to see that the cows actually enter on their own, in a specific order, and actually go to the same milking position every time. The entire process is automated to the point that the cows milk themselves and the humans come in to do maintenance. It is very interesting to see.

                              The most sickening thing about the video is the audio track. It really creeps me out.

                               

                              It a nearly totally unrelated issue:  The deer keep eating my tomatoes plants (which I have some fencing around, but the deer are eating the plants coming through the fencing which caused my best plant to be less supported and collapse upon itself last night). I wouldn't mind seeing a few deer slaughtered around here.

                                Age: 46 Weight: 205 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

                                Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 43:59; 5K 21:27

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