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Anyone run and listen to E-books at the same time? (Read 874 times)

mab411


Proboscis Colossus

    I listen to audiobooks all the time on the longer runs, for exactly this reason:

     

    I don't get so much time to read otherwise (too busy running), so this has been great.

     

    I took down the entire Hunger Games trilogy during the cycle for my first marathon (for a series with that title, there is an awful lot of food discussed), as well as 11/22/63 by Stephen King Wink.

     

    It's funny how, when I run some of those routes now, I can recall what was happening in the book at certain locations.  I can't remember, say, the title of 11/22/63 without looking it up to be sure, but I can remember that this is where I was when Katniss won her first Hunger Games (uh, spoiler alert).

     

    But I digress.  By the sound of it, you'd probably enjoy listening to podcasts as well.  You mentioned you have somewhat particular criteria with regard to books, and brother, let me assure you, there is a podcast or twelve out there for anyone's tastes.  Pick something you're interested in, plug it into the "Podcasts" section of the iTunes Store, and there you go - tons of free material to keep you occupied.

     

    The guy who wrote the book I used for my first marathon suggested smiling and being otherwise mirthful while running - he cited some physiological benefit that escapes me for the moment - so I tried out Tina Fey's book, also during that first cycle.  Meh.  The book was funny, but I can't say it helped much.  And I'm kind of like others: when I'd get really tickled, it became hard to run.

     

    I use Audible.com for the books.  We somehow got hooked into an automatically-renewing membership, but once I started listening to more audiobooks and figured out that the membership includes a free book per month, I decided it was worth it to keep going.  Membership is $15/mo., and most of the books, the good ones, are north of $20 each, so it's a savings.  I think I've heard that some libraries actually have a way to loan out audiobooks on mp3, but I haven't investigated that much.

     

    As for a device, the iPod shuffle is a great option, for the reasons already listed.  I'd add that you should be careful to keep sweat from getting on it as much as possible - I lost one to that, and now clip it to my Road ID, since I don't sweat much from my wrists.  The Sansa Clip Zip is also very good (and has a screen, which the Shuffle doesn't), the major drawback for me being that playlists, audiobooks, and some podcasts are either very difficult or impossible to play on it.  I mean, depending on how much you're willing to futz with file formats and the player itself on runs, it's possible to play them all, but with the iPod, you just drag everything onto the device and you're done.

     

    I do like to listen to music instead sometimes, and I do go without anything sometimes.  But I find that, for the long stuff, spoken-word audio helps the time go by.

     

    I feel "safe" listening while running because of two things: the fairly isolated back-country roads I use, and always using an option for earphones that allows me to hear ambient noise.  Yurbuds are good for this (though when the wind kicks up, it whistles through them and makes it tougher to hear outside noise), cheap, "on-ear" (not "cups") earphones are good for this (mine even have a reflective neckband), and of course the "one-ear-in" option is great (there are even companies devoted to this).  I always make sure I can hear my footfalls if I'm listening to music.

     

    One last thing: without turning this into a book suggestion thread, I'd encourage you to check out Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand.  Seems like it would be right up your alley given your military background, preference for non-fiction, and love for running.

     

    Hope this helps!

    "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people


    Needs more cowbell!

      but laughing...that makes my knees weak. I cannot listen to comedy and run. Tragedy...no problemo.

       

      A few times while listening to Sedaris or Chelsea Handler had me needing to stop to keep from falling.

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

        I've always listened to podcasts but started on books this year. For some reason, I've been on a 19th century classics tear:

        2 Trollops, 

        5 Dickens books

        1 Jane Austen (Emma)

         

        It's been really, really great. I don't get so much time to read otherwise (too busy running), so this has been great. I don't have a problem with crying while at race pace, but laughing...that makes my knees weak. I cannot listen to comedy and run. Tragedy...no problemo.

         

        Not everyone can say they run with 2 trollops..

        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

        ilanarama


        Hi, Mom!

          I do all my long runs and most of my easy runs listening to audiobooks or podcasts.  My library lends audiobooks online via Overdrive (you register at the library, and then can access the website from home to download the books, which expire automagically) and it's a great resource.  It used to be that you could only use certain types of music players with their system, but now most are compatible, I think.

           

          I'm currently listening to podcasts from Dan Carlin's Hardcore History. 

          Ilana is awesome. She lives in a cool place, drinks good beer, and runs hard. She should start a fucking lifestyle blog for chicks. - NC Runner

           

          PRs: 5K 21:03 (4/2012) 10K 43:06 (12/2011) 13.1 1:35:55 (10/2013) 26.2 3:23:31 (12/2013)

          Next up: Imogene Pass Run 9/6| bloggy stuff at http://ilanarama.dreamwidth.org

            Not everyone can say they run with 2 trollops..

            Wow.

            Well played! 

             

            (and shame on me for my spelling...)

               

              It's funny how, when I run some of those routes now, I can recall what was happening in the book at certain locations.  I can't remember, say, the title of 11/22/63 without looking it up to be sure, but I can remember that this is where I was when Katniss won her first Hunger Games (uh, spoiler alert). 

               

               

              I have the EXACT same thing. It's eerie. Especially since I'm horrible at names and faces.

               

              Actually, if you've ever read The Songlines by Bruce Chatwin (beautiful book), you realize suddenly how realistic it is. Talk about a great one to listen to on the run...


              Wandering Wally

                I listen to podcasts, old radio dramas, audio books, baseball games in the summer and hockey games in the winter while I run.  Sometimes I use my iPhone for the podcasts.  Most of the time I just throw them on my Sansa Clip mp3 player (small, light, inexpensive and well built).  I go with one earbud and leave the other out so I can hear what's around me.  90% of the time I don't see anyone else so I'm not too concerned about it.

                 

                For the podcasts, my iPhone just continues playing through what I have until I tell it to stop, so there's no fooling with it once I start.  On my mp3 player I build a playlist before I go and it just works through that playlist.

                Run!  Just Run!

                 

                Trail Runner Nation Podcast


                Shakedown Street

                  I've always listened to podcasts but started on books this year. For some reason, I've been on a 19th century classics tear:

                  2 Trollops, 

                  5 Dickens books

                  1 Jane Austen (Emma)

                   

                  It's been really, really great. I don't get so much time to read otherwise (too busy running), so this has been great. I don't have a problem with crying while at race pace, but laughing...that makes my knees weak. I cannot listen to comedy and run. Tragedy...no problemo.

                   You need to mix it up with some George Eliot

                  Started-5/12, RWOL refugee,5k-24:23 (1/12/13),10K-55:37(9/15/12),HM-1:52:59(3/24/13)

                    I second Audible.com.  I found a link where you can sign up for a free trial month and get two free audio books, and I downloaded the app to my Android.  And I've asked for an Audible membership for Christmas.  I'm currently listening to book 3 of the Hunger Games, and next up is probably The Hobbit.

                     

                    Things I have found to be helpful:

                    * Only listen to audio books while running.  No matter how exciting the book is.  This keeps me looking forward to getting up at o'dark-thirty.  Sort of.

                    * Don't listen to audio books during hard workouts.  That seems to be the consensus, judging from previous replies.  They work best for me during easy runs.  If I'm trying to push myself at all, then I need to focus on running.

                    * Here's the link for two free audio books: http://www.amazon.com/gp/audible/signup/display.html  (Not sure if it still works or not.  The offer may change periodically.)

                     

                    I think my library offers audio book rentals, but I haven't bothered trying to figure it out because it takes me forever to get through an audio book, and you can only rent them for a couple of weeks.

                    ~Kate

                     

                    "If you run, you are a runner. It doesn't matter how fast or how far. It doesn't matter if today is your first day or if you've been running for twenty years. There is no test to pass, no license to earn, no membership card to get. You just run." -John Bingham

                      I'm kind of surprised how expensive audio books are.

                        Wow.

                        Well played! 

                         

                        (and shame on me for my spelling...)

                         

                         +1

                           

                           

                          One last thing: without turning this into a book suggestion thread, I'd encourage you to check out Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand.  Seems like it would be right up your alley given your military background, preference for non-fiction, and love for running.

                           

                          Good read

                            I third Audible.com.  I have just a little bit left of To Heaven and Back by Mary Neal. I listened to most of it while trail running in Colorado.  Very enjoyable Smile

                            Live the Adventure. Enjoy the Journey. Be Kind. Have Faith!

                               

                              So to the final point now:  Have any of you runners ever listened to E-books while running?  Does that work out well?  And I will add that I am considering using this type device at an 'easier' pace run, such as on long training runs, or during a 24-hour type run where I am trying to occupy my mind over a long duration.   Any opinions would be helpful.  Just wondering if anyone has ever listened to books while easier pace running and found it helpful to take your mind elsewhere while on those long runs.  If anyone has, please list device you use and website you use for the Ebooks.   I have not looked at that yet, just been pondering the idea since my runs are getting longer, and also because I saw a commercial with a runner in it (Was it Rupp?) who was running and listening to "Moby Dick" and all the classic works while he ran.  

                              .

                               

                              I listen to ebooks all the time, and it works great (not for faster workouts, but for longer/easy runs).

                               

                              I use an ipod nano (not sure which generation).

                               

                              I dont pay for books, my library has an online resource (overdrive) through Noblenet (North of Boston Library Exchange)

                               

                              http://overdrive.noblenet.org/E03FFE00-2752-4A9B-B288-84AAEBB683A3/10/538/en/Default.htm

                               

                              which allows me to download as many audio books as I want (limited to 4 at a time, but by the time I finish one book I have access to another).  Your library may have something similar.

                                Our library does Overdrive, but it seems all the books are constantly checked out.  They need to license more of 'em.

                                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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