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Just bought the new Adidas Boost (Read 185 times)

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    Anybody else tried it ?  Seems really good, almost like the perfect combination of lightweight minimal, and padding.  A little pricey at $150 though

      Anybody else tried it ?  Seems really good, almost like the perfect combination of lightweight minimal, and padding.  A little pricey at $150 though

       

      it's a nice shoe.. has a smooth transition and a VERY surprisingly soft heel.  After about 30+ miles, I actually sterted to think it might not be firm enough for me.  But I think a lot of runners will dig this one.

       

      I can't wait to see the Boost midsole be placed in the faster Adidas shoes, like the adios.

      ---------
      (twitter) @SethGOrun
      (email)  seth@skechers.com


      Will Crew for Beer

         

        it's a nice shoe.. has a smooth transition and a VERY surprisingly soft heel.  After about 30+ miles, I actually sterted to think it might not be firm enough for me.  But I think a lot of runners will dig this one.

         

        I can't wait to see the Boost midsole be placed in the faster Adidas shoes, like the adios.

         

        I was wondering about how soft it would feel. I've come to love the firmness of my Boston 3s and don't know if I'd like anything that felt softer.

        2014 Goal: A Fall race TBD.

          Anybody else tried it ?  Seems really good, almost like the perfect combination of lightweight minimal, and padding.  A little pricey at $150 though

           

          A 'little' pricey?!

          So_Im_a_Runner


          Go figure

            I found them pretty mushy. I've been looking for something to race my next marathon in and decided I wanted more feel (chose the LunaRacer 3). The upper is also uncomfortably snug for me. I could see them being a nice shoe for logging miles, especially if they fixed the sock style upper.

            PRs:  Marathon (2:49xx; '13)  Half (1:25xx; '12) 10k (40:26; '11) 5mi (29:23; '13) 5k (17:33; '13)

              Part of the advertising puff has been that the material in the boost will last better than the usual stuff which, if really so, might mean you get more miles out of these shoes.

               

              No idea if it'll actually work out that way...

                I've read something about this new material.  An interesting concept.  It is quite appealing; more resilient and responding and long-lasting...  Sounds good.  Now, granted, I haven't tried them.  But from what I've heard about it, my thought is; first of all, if it's so responding and all, why did they made it with such thick heel and, especially, the rubber part sticking up at the end.  This would be, and could have been, a perfect material to make this shoe quite thin and, what do you call it, low profile? (less thickness difference between forefoot and heel) but they didn't.  It seems that most shoe companies, though they had shifted the focus more toward minimalist-type shoes, they are not quite brave enough (or simply, hadn't quite gotten the whole idea as yet) to build the shoe right based on the concept; not on gimmick.  They come up with great promising material but, yet, they just can't get away from the old concept to "make it right".  It's the same thing with Nike Free.  Great concept; but they just couldn't build the heel part narrow and thin--like "real barefoot feel" as they claim this shoe is supposed to be.  What kind of "barefoot" has such thick and wide heel?  None.  So they incorporated a great revolutionary concept but still couldn't get away from the old thinking.  Pity...

                 

                I remember talking to Newton people several years ago.  Great concept but they had the heel part so thick and big and bulky.  "If we didn't build it this way, people won't buy them..." they said.  That was something like back in 2004 or 2005.  Of course, now they have a racing shoes that's very very good.  But, if their concept is to teach forefoot landing, they wouldn't even need any heel, would they?  At that time, they still couldn't get away from the old thinking.  And now with adidas, I can see the same thing happening.  They want to be revolutionary and they got great material but...they just couldn't get away from the old thinking.  Unfortunately, regardless of what the ad says, that's not "revolutionary".  I've seen many "revolutionary" materials buried and disappeared in this business.  I'm afraid this could be yet another one...

                 

                "Pretty mushy" is yet another mistake.  So they've got this great material and, yet, they had to make them "soft" because, when they built it thin (thinner than "regular" shoes), they probably thought they would have to make it extra soft (cushiony) so people would buy them.  "Pretty mushy" actually means non-responsive.  Non-responsive means your force would all (well, not all...) be absorbed into that material.  That means you'll be losing optimum stride length because the force generated by your legs will be "mushed" into this material.  Again, they had a perfect opportunity to make it right as a great performance shoes; but, instead, it seems that they had made it into "mass shoes".  Surely, that's what the company's objective is--to make money by selling a lot of them.  Of course, I thought that's where all this problem had started with modern shoe industry.  We had hoped that they had learnt a lesson but, well, it seems not...

                I found them pretty mushy. I've been looking for something to race my next marathon in and decided I wanted more feel (chose the LunaRacer 3). The upper is also uncomfortably snug for me. I could see them being a nice shoe for logging miles, especially if they fixed the sock style upper.


                Black-Toe-Nailed

                  I read the specs and saw the video.

                   

                  In physics (you know, these guys who measure forces and stuff ) elasticity means diffusion of a force. An whe we should aim to is to transfer as much force to the ground as we possibly can. If he have diffusion, bad things happens... or good. Look at the bullet proof vests; when a bullet impacts it the force gets diffused and damped keeping us alive.

                   

                  This is awesome news if you actually want  a force to get reduced for some reason. If what you want, however, is to drive a nail into a piece of wood with a hammer the last thing that you want is to put a layer of kevlar or rubber to dampen the impact.

                   

                  And the same goes for shoes: Damping = loss of transmitted force.

                   

                  Ok, ok, we don't want to run like Zola Budd or Abebe Bikila, but I still want as much force applied to the ground as possible, thus damping is not an option, at least not for a racing flat. I agree, these shoes are not flats, but they aren't any beter than any other piece of rubber you put on your feet no matter what fancy names and secret superpowers the fashion designers  who made up the shoe try to sell us. As a matter of  fact: It's all neoprene with a bit of colour, some idiot gel for decorating purposes and a nice list of pseudo-scientific buzzwords.

                  I stick to my Adizero Mana, the neoprene will not make me jump like a feather, make me 10 years younger or enlarge my manhood, but it keeps me going for a few thousand miles and the price is right.

                  --

                  "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
                  then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
                  I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

                  Emil Zatopek

                  Down100


                    well, I've been running in them couple of weeks now and love them.  light weight, good feel.  I'm a midfoot striker and have no problems.  I'd like to go more minimalist in the future, but I think these will put me in that direction.