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Recovery Time - long runs (Read 1402 times)

EliBuford


    I'm surprised your coach, now that CC practice has officially started in most schools,  hasn't put a stop to weekend 5ks.

    It might be worthwhile to tell your coach...

     The 5k was our team's intra-squad meet. 

    JML


      Also questionable: MYTH #7: ICE BATHS SPEED RECOVERY

      There was a better article on it in a recent RunningTimes, I think.  But I didn't find it easily.

       

       

      You mean that I have been freezing myself for nothing other than the amusement of my wife at my girlish shrieking?!?     Damnit!

       2014 goals: run a bunch....race some.....repeat...

         The 5k was our team's intra-squad meet. 

         

        Okay..So, the "too hard" 10 miler was all on your own?

          You mean that I have been freezing myself for nothing other than the amusement of my wife at my girlish shrieking?!?     Damnit!

           

          You aren't the only one :-)

           

          However, the article didn't say that it wasn't an effective way to help with pain and recovery, and it said there were times when it was okay to use these techniques such as when you don't want to be sore for a race. If i recall from when I read it a few weeks ago, the gist is that you should avoid them when in the building mode because it hinders development/growth. That is, let the inflammation do it's thing. Frankly, I'm still skeptical of the results though. 

            xor


              Why did I click on this thread

              Why did I click on this thread

               

                Why did I click on this thread

                Why did I click on this thread

                 

                You didn't want to see Galen and Mo together in an ice bath. Come now...

                They say golf is like life, but don't believe them. Golf is more complicated than that. "If I am still standing at the end of the race, hit me with a Board and knock me down, because that means I didn't run hard enough" If a lot of people gripped a knife and fork the way they do a golf club, they'd starve to death. "Don't fear moving slowly forward...fear standing still."

                  Hey Bat, my condolences on your "successful" lottery.

                  “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                  Poppypbr


                    I recently shifted long run strategy to go from running for a certain amount of time to running a prescribed distance.  Last week I ran a 12 mile long run (my longest by about a mile and half in this cycle) and it took three days to recover fully.  I'm wondering if there's any reason not to take NSAIDs or Aspirin if I'm still sore after 48 hours. 

                     Nix on the NSAIDS. The aspirin isn't too bad but only if you do the following and you still feel poorly. To help recover from a difficult and hard workout (and I'm sure your body was telling you within the first hour that you were in for a tough recovery) try a nice warm bath and soak in it getting a full and complete blood flow to your legs and hips. Even run some additional hot water in it and make it very relaxing. An hour of this and a liter bottle of tonic water (besides the hydration it has a little quinine it it which will subtly sooth sore muscles and joints) with some healthy food like a lettuce, tomato, cucumber, cheese and turkey breast sandwich on oatnut bread along with your chosen vitamin and mineral supplementation will set your body well on its way to a fast recovery.

                     

                    A long run once a week should not exceed 2/7ths of the last 7 day total. To do 12 miles and be properly prepared physiologically to do it without undue strain and possible risk of injury or harm, you needed to have 42 miles for the previous 7 days and preferably 84 miles for the last 14 days. If you had done the 84 miles for the last 14 days, you could run the 12 miles safely. If its the longest run of the week, it shouldn't be done above long moderately slow distance. Faster than that should be relegated to shorter distances than a distance that is twice your daily normal.

                     

                    3,2,5,3,5,2,8 = 28  In this example, the two 5 milers are where a quicker effort should be applied for a mile or two, but not so much on the first 5 miler that there is nothing left for the second. Its important to control your effort so you can run the week's sequence. If unable to run the sequence, you cannot increase the mileage for the following week.

                      We all know that Pi is the answer to everything in nature along with 42.  Anyway all runs should feature some factor of pi, so run this sequence 3.14, 6.28, 3.14, 9.42, 3.14, and 42 on the weekend.  Start with kilometers at first (or even furlongs) if you can't run those in miles yet.

                       

                      MTA, in case anyone takes this seriously,  Running ain't numerology.


                      Feeling the growl again

                        You didn't want to see Galen and Mo together in an ice bath. Come now...

                         

                        Coulda done without the tightie-whities, at least...

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         

                        ilp


                          In my opinion, you're running your long runs way too fast. If your tempo run is 10:53 at 57 minutes duration, your 12 mile long run should certainly not be at a 10:53 pace.

                           

                          I bet that's why you're taking 3 days to recover. It seems you almost raced your long run instead of actually taking it easy.

                           

                          (Of course, looks like you run a lot of mountainous terrain, so maybe I can't compare all the runs.)

                           

                          Why did you switch to running a prescribed distance instead of prescribed time? Your body doesn't know pace, it only knows effort over time. For long runs, the key is lower-end effort for an extended period of time. Time is key. At about the 90 minute mark, you start reaping the true benefits of a long run. If you really want to go for long-run quality, go for a 2.5 hr run duration at a pace that's slow enough that 1) you can actually complete the run, 2) that you dont' slog through the 2nd half because you're so beat (then you went out too fast or you need to dial down the time and work your way up), and 3) that you only need a full day's recovery from.

                           

                          I also agree with the supporting mileage comment. Add a slower Tuesday or Wednesday run at about 70% duration of your long run (so for your 2:10 run, you'd shoot for ~1:30 hrs), at a slightly slightly faster tempo. Instead of taking more days off, add some easy jogging of 30-45 minutes in duration, going slower than your long runs.

                            A long run once a week should not exceed 2/7ths of the last 7 day total. To do 12 miles and be properly prepared physiologically to do it without undue strain and possible risk of injury or harm, you needed to have 42 miles for the previous 7 days and preferably 84 miles for the last 14 days. If you had done the 84 miles for the last 14 days, you could run the 12 miles safely. 

                             

                            "[Ian Dobson] tries to rub the creases out from between his eyes. 'Well, it’s not mathematical,' he gently corrects me. 'It should be mathematical, but it’s not.'"

                             

                            A great read!

                            http://www.propellermag.com/Summer2012/Heald1Summer12.html


                              Coulda done without the tightie-whities, at least...

                               

                              Without? I'm actually glad they left them on, but to each his own.

                              HF #8206

                               

                              DoppleBock


                                Make sure you are running the long run at the correct effort level - If I were trying to add endurance and getting into distances for the 1st time ever, I would be doing them at a very easy pace. 

                                 

                                I remember the 1st time I ran 14 miles - I took an hour nap afterward - It was tough

                                 

                                I remembe the 1st time I ran 16 and 21 miles they were huge runs that took awhile to recover from.  It got easier each time after and less stressful to my body.

                                 

                                The one thing that I found once I started hitting 12+ miles is that I had to pay more  attention to my hydration on a daily basis and it helped me to take water while running the longer runs.

                                 

                                Once I had gained the endurance and support systems to run the longer distance more easily - I then started to run them faster.  Now I often do a 20+ mile run with a speed workout in the 2nd half of the run.

                                 

                                Most times a 30 or even 40 mile run does not require extended recovery days -

                                http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                                2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                                 

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