mediocrity (Read 450 times)

    ...both stemming from a variety of genetic and environmental factors.

     

    I think we have a thesis statement

    and coachs are bartenders

     

    Very nice!

      Sadly, many also view the ideal temperamental quality only in relation to training.  Hitting workouts on the track by yourself or with a training group is nothing.  Trying to bury your competitor after spending an hour in the bowels of a stadium thinking about your race while listening to the crowd roar during other events is a whole other thing.  Knowing that you need to perform in front of thousands of people in the biggest race of your life is a special quality of its own.

       

       

       

       

       We imagine the ideal temperamental quality, almost exclusively, as stubborn and dogged determination or a capacity for work. And then we imagine the best physical qualities as being skinny, having a big heart, etc. But if you are around athletes a lot, you realize that the cocktail of performance is a quite delicate blend of temperamental and physical qualities.

       

       

      A lazy man's sport?  I knew I picked the right one!

      There was a point in my life when I ran. Now, I just run.

       

      Well, fuckers

      He still stands

       

      The Diary of a Once-ran.

      J-L-C


         

        It's funny you view it as a lazy man's sport. When my non-running friends look at runners, they just can't imagine doing that much "training". I see your point if I look at it from the perspective of the amount of time spent actually running.

         

        I used to be a cyclist and I can't imagine attempting to spend as much time running as I did time on a bike. One of the things I like about running is how little training you can actually do (due to impact and all)..

         

        To be regionally competitive in cycling I'd train 15-20 hours a week. For running, 7-8. That's a huge difference!


        Feeling the growl again

           

          I used to be a cyclist and I can't imagine attempting spend as much time training on a bike versus running. One of the things I like about running is how little training you can actually do (due to impact and all)..

           

          To be regionally competitive in cycling I'd train 15-20 hours a week. For running, 7-8. That's a huge difference!

           

          Yes.

           

          In college, my friends on the nordic ski team considers 3 hours a day an "easy day".

          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand