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Different shoes for the sake of different shoes? (Read 2013 times)


Not Your Average Joe

    I'm a fairly new runner (started back in January).  I bought some New Balance 760s to run in back in February and I'll have 400 miles in them at the end of this week.  These shoes have held up well and I'm not having any problems with them, but I'd like to go ahead and get some new shoes and phase them in gradually until the old shoes are finished.


    Overall, I've been very pleased with the NB760s, but I keep thinking that I should try something different when I buy new shoes.  I'm conflicted because I know what I'd be getting with a fresh pair of the same shoes, but since I've never owned anything else, I feel like I might be missing something that works even better.  For example, I tried on some Saucony stability shoes at the same time I bought the NBs.  They seemed a bit more "squishy" so I didn't get them, but now I'm wondering if I might like that better.


    Meh, I'm just confused.

    Hi!

      I try all sorts of shoes and no shoes, even, at whim.

      All lightweight trainers or racers. Or trail.

      Mostly cuz they're pretty.

      Maybe some will work better for you. Maybe not.

      I do think people put too much faith/blame in footwear.

      And, really, it doesn't matter if you pick a different one, because you know those shoe companies are gonna tinker with the model you like. Even, sometimes, to the point of it not being the same anymore.

      I've found, anyway.

      BTW: 400 may have lots of life left, despite what "they" tell you. I just retired a pair of NBs at 1000ish. Probably will use them on the treadmill. Another pair of regular rotation Asics has about 960. YMMV on this though.

      I rotate lots of shoes.

        If it's working for you, I wouldn't change - or at least I'd get another pair, if they're still available. But consider what else is out there and try something else. It's a good idea to have two pairs of shoes in rotation - same model or different. If you've got 2 pairs of same model but with different amounts of wear, you can tell when the older pair needs replacing. If you've got two different models, you have some experience with an alternate when one pair gets discontinued or modified so it doesn't work for you anymore.

         

        As already mentioned, the shoe manufacturers *will* change the shoe. Sometimes they get better for some runners, sometimes they become unusable for their old fans.

         

        That said, if you're relatively new to running, you may find some of your foot and biomechanics will change as you get stronger, so you may not want to buy too many pairs in advance.

         

        I'm rotating through several pairs of shoes now, 2 models, and waiting for LRS to get NB8xx in my size. I've found different shoes may work better for me in winter (can wear heavier socks), others are better on more technical trails, others better for multi-hour long runs. I used to wear one model (went through 7-8 pairs, recommended by my PT) and was afraid to try something else. Then the model was discontinued and my feet also started getting a bit wider than they already were, esp. at end of long runs.

         

        (I might add that in my search for decent wide shoes and using a few models that were tolerable, but not really good for what I wanted, because I couldn't find anything better, I think I have more shoe models (present and discontinued) than our LRS, which is small and only carries 3 brands, some models.)

        "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


        A Saucy Wench

          I like to alternate brands of shoes day to day.  I find that my feet/legs give me fewer hassles when I do.  Each brand, even amongst the same stability level tends to support/cushion different aspects and I think things just work better when I vary it. For example: Brooks are kinder to my knees and hips but harder on my achilles/plantar than mizuno. Cushion vs. flexibility.

           

           

          I now alternate both brands and stability level for different types of runs, but I am a bit of a running shoe whore right now .   Neutral works better for me for fast running as I do not pronate when I am doing speedwork and too much speedwork in guidance shoes honks off my achilles/pf/peroneal.  However if I wear neutral on long slow runs on cambered roads my right knee grumps so I wear guidance then.   When my achilles REALLY hurts I wear lightweight racers.

          I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

           

          "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


          Feeling the growl again

            For regular trainers, if you are new, there is no harm in trying a few different pairs to make sure you're not missing something.  However, there is something to be said for sticking with what works.


            I am NOT a new runner, I've been at this thing regularly since 1992 or so.  For the first ten years or so I'd often try new shoes, whatever they had in the store when I walked in.  Half the time I like them, half the time I suffered through them until it was time for new ones.


            I'm in Mizuno Wave Precisions right now.  I have no idea how many pairs in a row I've had, it's been since 2005 or so when I stepped down to a lighter shoe from Wave Riders (went through 12-15 pairs of those in a row).  Mizuno is kind enough NOT to ruin a good shoe like NB did to me with the 763 (last non-Mizuno trainer I bought, 2002 or 2003ish).  Therefore they've sold me probably 18-20 pairs of these in a row...bought 4 pairs at once last time, to capitalize on a deal.


            I wear various flats and "marathon" flats for workouts as well.  For several years I wore Adidas Cubatos, then Adidas went and killed them on me.  I bought out every pair I could scrounge on the internet and still wear them 4-5 years after they were discontinued.  I use what works!  Trying different shoes gets expensive.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             


            A Saucy Wench

              For regular trainers, if you are new, there is no harm in trying a few different pairs to make sure you're not missing something.  However, there is something to be said for sticking with what works.


              I am NOT a new runner, I've been at this thing regularly since 1992 or so.  For the first ten years or so I'd often try new shoes, whatever they had in the store when I walked in.  Half the time I like them, half the time I suffered through them until it was time for new ones.


               I do have to add I am a PITA at the running store.  I have returned 2 pairs in the last year because they felt good in the store but didnt feel good after a couple of runs.   I try to keep my first 25-40 miles in a shoe on relatively cleanish dryish pavement for this reason, but if I dont love them they go back.   On the other hand, I rarely buy my shoes online (unless I find true love and they are being discontinued) they get my loyalty, but they get my neurosis as well.  And I don't beat a dead horse.  Saucony gave me blisters, I wont try them again. 

              I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

               

              "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


              Needs more cowbell!

                Saucony gave me blisters, I wont try them again. 

                 

                Their high, curved heel tab tore up my lower achilles area on one foot in a pair of the original Guides.  Apparently this is not uncommon for a lot of people with Saucony.  Maybe I wouldn't have this problem now, but I'm chicken to try any of their shoes again.

                I shoot pretty things! ~

                '14 Goals:

                • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                  Just in the last 6 months I have started rotating in different brands of shoes.  Before, I had rotated only the same make and model, but I was feeling a little bored with that.  I love my Asics Nimbus (neutral), hands down my favorite.  I took out a pair of Brooks.......the Adrenaline (stability) oddly enough has been a decent shoe.......and then I have recently started into trail running and bought some Inov-8 shoes.  Frankly, I think my ankles and knees are better for having slightly different fit and action with the shoes.  I think I will continue to try a rotation made up of two or three different brands, for sure.......

                  ✔ Think of setting 2013 goals.

                  Stop being a fat slob.

                  Run more miles than last year.

                    heh heh, I went through a similar quandary a few months ago -- get same shoes or diff shoe of same type. I ended up getting a different shoe of the same type and have no complaints.


                    I started out with Saucony ProGrid Omni 8 or something like that. And for the 2nd pair I ended up getting the New Balance 760. The New Balance are def firmer feeling than the Saucony.




                    I look my best blurry!

                        

                       

                      I now alternate both brands and stability level for different types of runs, but I am a bit of a running shoe whore right now .   

                      I like to think it happens to the best of us.  If they (look good) and feel good,  I have to give them a try.  Having a little guilt about it.  Variety is the spice of life, they say.  

                      MTA- Just letting you know that this is in no way intelligent or professional advice.  I brought 3 pair on vacation with me!  

                      mjames2124


                        I'm also a  new runner. I switched from Mizuno Universe to a pair of Asics Gel Nimbus. My last pair irritated my heels. My new pair of shoes has helped my speed and performance.

                         

                        I'm up here in Boulder Colorado and got a pretty good on a pair at Boulder Running Company. Check them out. They are locally-owned and operated. 

                          I'm a fairly new runner (started back in January).  I bought some New Balance 760s to run in back in February and I'll have 400 miles in them at the end of this week.  These shoes have held up well and I'm not having any problems with them, but I'd like to go ahead and get some new shoes and phase them in gradually until the old shoes are finished.

                           

                          Overall, I've been very pleased with the NB760s, but I keep thinking that I should try something different when I buy new shoes.  I'm conflicted because I know what I'd be getting with a fresh pair of the same shoes, but since I've never owned anything else, I feel like I might be missing something that works even better.  For example, I tried on some Saucony stability shoes at the same time I bought the NBs.  They seemed a bit more "squishy" so I didn't get them, but now I'm wondering if I might like that better.

                           

                          Meh, I'm just confused.

                          I'm following tweet by a group in Japan called "Shoe Master".  Most of what they say really make sense and in sync with what I believe.  The latest topic was "myth of One Size Bigger".  The uncle of the main guy used to own a running speciality store in Nagoya, Japan, where I used to hang out a lot.  So he knows and understand the manufacture's side of stories as well.  They listed a few (about a dozen) issues associated with getting shoes "one size bigger" and then pointed out that the shoe is actually made one size bigger to begin with (for example, if you purchase 27.5cm--my size--shoes, the shoe itself is actually built around 28.5cm last).  In the US side, it's 9.5.  So to get 10.5 is actually 2cm bigger than what you really need.  I had exchanged personal e-mails several times with this guy and am about to send him one.  When people go after "one size bigger" shoes is because the shoe itself just doesn't fit the individual's foot.  When the shoe doesn't fit, then you need to have some "wiggle" room and the easiest way to do so is to get one size bigger.  For our Lydiard Certificate Program Part III, I just recently put together a series of diagram to prove this--makes it quite clear visually.  Lydiard used to say; "You don't pronate or supinate; the shoe does."  Well, not quite 100% but in most cases, yes.  And this really proves it clearly.  

                           

                          Okay, so the point is; yes, it probably does pay to own a several pairs of shoes.  But, when you do so, you have to think hard about at least 2 things.  One, as I said above, you've GOT to get the right shoes for your feet.  This means the SHAPE, or in shoe manufacturer's term, last.  There are always tons of "gimmicks" that various shoe manufacturers come up with every year.  But, unless the shape fits, no technology in the world won't really help you much.  Years ago (a couple of decades ago, as a matter of fact), Converse had shoe lace that runs on the side of your foot (laterally).  I thought it was a good idea but the shape sucked so I didn't even bother to try on.  Nike is coming up with this seamless shoes now but, to me, whether or not it's worthy of even looking into is yet to be determined because I haven't even gotten around to check the shape of the shoe (they had been coming up with some weird "S" shape last which I don't like at all...).  So, whatever the shoe you're going to get, make sure the shape fits.

                           

                          Two, think hard about your pattern of running.  That means how you run as well as what kind of training you do.  In my own case, I have one pair that's a bit cushiony that I wear when my legs are tired or sore.  My real minimalist shoes which I used to always run in, I now use when I go for some easy running--I go the other way around with most people out there; I do my first several speed workouts in my heavy shoes and do my easy jog in minimalist shoes.  Think about it; you get a heck of a lot more stress to your legs in faster workouts so wouldn't it make sense to wear more protective shoes initially (of course, you'll move on to wear more racing shoes once your legs get used to it and stronger) and start out minimalist shoes in easy jogging where you don't get much stress to your legs at all?  If I don't jog in minimalist shoes once in a while, I feel my feet and lower legs get weaker and easily get banged up.  So I would rotate these guys.  Of course, majority of runs are done in my "favorite" shoes.  In fact, I have 2 sizes of these--9.5 and 10.0.  When I run faster, I wear more snug ones.  To add, in fact, I switched the insole so 9.5 have very thin insole and 10.0 have a bit thicker ones.  And I wear thin socks with 9.5 and thicker socks with 10.0 (in winter).  As a matter of fact, because these guys fit my feet so well that, basically, the thin insole I placed in 9.5 are so thin and no arch support or anything and it won't bother me at all.  This is because the SHAPE of the shoe fits my foot well.  In other words, there's no extra dead space.  

                           

                          I personally don't believe in picking shoes by brand.  Good shoes are good shoes.  However, each manufacturer seems to have their own "last" and, if you know one brand fits your feet better than the other(s), try checking out the same brand shoes first because there is more likelihood that they fit your feet better.  But not always so beware.  What you want is to put them on and put the weight down on your feet.  There shouldn't be any pressure point.  Then, if you CAN run (on treadmill or inside shopping mall, etc.) in them to see how it feels.  If you can't do that, at least bend your toes and create the foot just before the take-off.  Some shoes have way too much "junk" on the upper that it creates wrinkles that could dig into your foot.  So make sure that won't happen--in other words, there shouldn't be any pressure point in every position of your foot in the running action.  The direction of the "force" plays an important role as well but I won't go into it too deeply.  What I mean, in a simple term, for example, if you still land on your heel, having thick heel rubber is fine but, if you're trying to switch the form to mid-foot landing, if the heel rubber is too thick, you'll create too much forward sliding and more likely to jam your toes into the end of the shoe PARTICULARLY if you picked one-size-bigger shoes and there's extra room for your foot to slide around.  

                           

                          Shoes, by far, ARE the most important equipment for runners--more important than Garmin or water bottle belt.  Do some research, talk to people who are NOT in the money-making situation by selling running shoes and, most importantly, talk to your feet; and spend extra money on them if necessary (not necessarily to buy the most expensive shoes but, if necessary, get several pairs to rotate).

                            Regarding getting the right size shoe - or at least screening out some obvious misfits - I've found Shoefitr to be really helpful. (use it at runningwarehouse.com)  I've got a wide forefoot, narrow heel and very few models fit me well. (and model updates tend to make toeboxes more narrow)

                             

                            They've scanned many models and present both a 3D and 2D image. You tell them what shoe model and size you have now that fits best, then it will make suggestions on size for the shoe model you're considering. Green coloration means it fits about same as present shoe, blue means its looser, and yellow/red means it's tighter. The 3D image lets you see how it fits throughout the shoe - toes, heel, midfoot,etc. The 2D image lets you see whether the increased room is a result of getting a larger size with too long toe or whether it's because it is a wider shoe in the forefoot.

                             

                            For me, the variation is about 1.5-2 sizes across different models, and that's without going over-long to get the width, iirc.

                             

                            The unfortunate thing for me is that it doesn't have the shoe models that actually fit me best to use as a standard. It's got one that's ok in the forefoot, but different shape / last. At least it gives me a starting point.

                             

                            Around here, many shoe stores have a ramp so you can see how the shoe fits going both up and down hill. While some have tm, the tm may be much softer than outside. I don't think I've ever had a shoe feel the same on the tm in the store as I do when running in it outside.

                             

                             

                            PS: Yes, I recognize this is a 2-yr old thread. Wink

                            "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog

                              PS: Yes, I recognize this is a 2-yr old thread. Wink

                              No, I didn't even realize that this was a 2-year-old thread!! ;o)

                               

                              Sorry about your feet!! :-D  You MAY be able to play around with insole--I have done this before; like I would cut the insole in half, around the mid foot area and use really thin material for forefoot to give more room.  Also, I have used one of those rubber heel-cup and attached (glued) that to the back side of the insole (I mean, literally, shave some material off the back area and glued the rubber heel cup to fill the gap in the heel area).  Years ago, some of Japanese ASICS shoes had such roomy heel area (they claimed Japanese have wider heel) and I didn't like it so that's the trick I employed.  Now they seem to make the heel much narrower.  Interestingly, at that time, Nike had many of their racing flats with very narrow heel which I liked a lot.  But now their racing shoes have much wider heel and I don't like that at all.