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trying to get mileage to 50+ per week. Are short runs options or a waste of time. (Read 2053 times)

dallasboycows


    So I currently am getting in about 40 mpw which is the max I can really fit in working 3 jobs.  I do have 2 seperate times that i could squeeze in 3-4 mile runs depending on speed between jobs.  Optimally I would like to be around 50 miles per week.  Are short runs an option. Perhaps used as faster runs? What about if I'm running them at the same pace as my general medium-long distance runs?

      So I currently am getting in about 40 mpw which is the max I can really fit in working 3 jobs.  I do have 2 seperate times that i could squeeze in 3-4 mile runs depending on speed between jobs.  Optimally I would like to be around 50 miles per week.  Are short runs an option. Perhaps used as faster runs? What about if I'm running them at the same pace as my general medium-long distance runs?

      Every mile counts. 

        I've found my evening 6-7 milers feel easier on days I run a very easy 30 minutes either in the morning or at lunch( credit Nobby for this idea) These are just extra, rest of the planned runs are not changed because of these easy recovery runs.

          This post is a little off topic, but it is an issue that I have been thinking about a lot.

           

          Personally, I think more people should be doing shorter runs. One "mistake" that I see new or inexperienced runners make too often in the pursuit of mileage is to do almost all of their mileage in runs of 60+ minutes. I think that the best "bang for your buck" run is the 35 or 40 minute run at an easy but steady clip. The run can be completed with minimal fatigue while also running at a decent pace. Form is good because the runner is not running tired.

           

          If you look at what experienced runners do, you will see a 35-45 minute run almost every day. Slower runners look at these logs and see that the "key" is doing runs of 5-7 miles, but perhaps they miss the fact that this might be only 3 or 4 mile for them.

           

          I have made this mistake in my own training. You look at a guy like malmo (George Malley, former AR holder in the half marathon). He has posted his training a lot on letsrun. He is mentioned as a high mileage success, and rightfully so because he ran 140+mpw on occasion. His bread and butter training was 8 miles in the am, 8 miles in the pm.

           

          But if you stop and think a bit, you see that he was doing these runs at 5:20-6:00 pace. One of the best runners in the country was running 45-50 minutes in the morning, 45-50 minutes in the evening. So if you want to train like malmo, running high mileage, you should maybe start with 30 minutes in the morning, 30 minutes at night. After a few years, maybe you will be able to handle 45-50 in the am, 45-50 in the pm--but this will still be perhaps "only" 6 miles for each run. High mileage!

           

          Now because of the attention to high mileage as a key for marathon success (which is true--it is the key) you have new runners shooting for 50-60 miles per week at 9 minutes per mile, in singles. This is essentially 81 minutes on average per run! No run in the week shorter than an hour. This sort of schedule teaches the body to run poorly because it is not strong enough to endure and run properly.

           

          Then they wonder why they are injured so often and fail to improve!


          Feeling the growl again

            If you can get 20 minutes of running, I'd do it and not feel bad about it.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

              I'm not sure how to feel about this thread. I mean I agree with all of the last four posts but it almost feels like Jeff and Nobby logged in as each other.

              Runners run.

                I'm not sure how to feel about this thread. I mean I agree with all of the last four posts but it almost feels like Jeff and Nobby logged in as each other.

                 

                mikey -- vely funny : o )

                  I'm not sure how to feel about this thread. I mean I agree with all of the last four posts but it almost feels like Jeff and Nobby logged in as each other.

                   

                  It would have been complete if Jeff told some more stories. mentioning malmo posts on let's run not quite enough


                  Prince of Fatness

                    I like the idea of running whenever time allows and don't think that it's a waste of time.  I'm not sure that I'd try to shoehorn miles into the time slot.  If it's an easy day run easy for the time you have, etc.  The miles will add up.  You could always throw some strides in if you wanted to work on your speed.

                    Semi-retired.

                      I'm not sure how to feel about this thread. I mean I agree with all of the last four posts but it almost feels like Jeff and Nobby logged in as each other.

                       

                      I was wondering why Nobby had only a 3 word response....

                      That's funny Smile

                      2014 Goals:

                      #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                      #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                       

                        I run quite a bit more than 50 miles per week and I regularly have 3-5 mile runs in my schedule. Once you get comfortable doubling (and tripling) you will probably see a big improvement in your races. At least your recovery time will improve and you will be able to do more quality work. 

                          Now because of the attention to high mileage as a key for marathon success (which is true--it is the key) you have new runners shooting for 50-60 miles per week at 9 minutes per mile, in singles.

                          Have you been reading my log? Blush

                           

                          Sometimes I feel like the very short run is almost not worth it simply because of the time involved in changing clothes, showering again, etc.  I'm wrapping up the Pfitz 70-max plan and, for that reason, just couldn't bring myself to do the few doubles he has in there (6 am / 4 pm).

                          dallasboycows


                            wow, I didn't expect so much advice.  I appreciate everything.  Ok, so I've came up with a couple of things based both on this forum and talking to several runners.

                             

                            1. shorter runs can be used for speedwork/tempowork if time is lacking.

                            2. if I only think I have time for 3 miles push just a little faster to get the 5 miles(kind of the same as 1.)

                            3. Some short runs are ok, and probably will speed recovery build a little extra leg strength but don't put too much of the bulk into these runs.

                            4. as another poster said, practice strides, pacing, maybe a short hill session.

                             

                            Some of this is repetitive and maybe not even right but kind of a summation of what I heard from my responses, my local running group and runners from my gym.  All in all I don't think adding these runs in are going to hurt at all. 

                             

                            BTW another poster added something that I think I myself find myself guilty of and might hurt me at times and that is the falling into the habit of getting so much mileage in that your miles start falling into a slow pace i.e. 8:30-9:00 miles. 

                            Scout7


                            CPT Curmudgeon

                              Short runs are always an option.

                               

                              How you run them depends on your goals, and what you've found works for you.

                                This post is a little off topic, but it is an issue that I have been thinking about a lot.

                                 

                                Personally, I think more people should be doing shorter runs. One "mistake" that I see new or inexperienced runners make too often in the pursuit of mileage is to do almost all of their mileage in runs of 60+ minutes. I think that the best "bang for your buck" run is the 35 or 40 minute run at an easy but steady clip. The run can be completed with minimal fatigue while also running at a decent pace. Form is good because the runner is not running tired.

                                 

                                If you look at what experienced runners do, you will see a 35-45 minute run almost every day. Slower runners look at these logs and see that the "key" is doing runs of 5-7 miles, but perhaps they miss the fact that this might be only 3 or 4 mile for them.

                                 

                                I have made this mistake in my own training. You look at a guy like malmo (George Malley, former AR holder in the half marathon). He has posted his training a lot on letsrun. He is mentioned as a high mileage success, and rightfully so because he ran 140+mpw on occasion. His bread and butter training was 8 miles in the am, 8 miles in the pm.

                                 

                                But if you stop and think a bit, you see that he was doing these runs at 5:20-6:00 pace. One of the best runners in the country was running 45-50 minutes in the morning, 45-50 minutes in the evening. So if you want to train like malmo, running high mileage, you should maybe start with 30 minutes in the morning, 30 minutes at night. After a few years, maybe you will be able to handle 45-50 in the am, 45-50 in the pm--but this will still be perhaps "only" 6 miles for each run. High mileage!

                                 

                                Now because of the attention to high mileage as a key for marathon success (which is true--it is the key) you have new runners shooting for 50-60 miles per week at 9 minutes per mile, in singles. This is essentially 81 minutes on average per run! No run in the week shorter than an hour. This sort of schedule teaches the body to run poorly because it

                                Then they wonder why they are injured so often and fail to improve!

                                This is why I love this site. 

                                A total novice such as myself who has never been anywhere near a team or a coach can glean some really useful information.

                                Putting it into practice might be another thing Joking

                                 

                                And yes, Mike, that was pretty funny.

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