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Which way should i run when running long distance (Read 303 times)

novacore


    i made a post earlier about a 2 mile run in a certain amount of time.

     

    being new to running, i usually would stop jogging about every .3-4 miles, and i am usually able to do over 2 miles without my legs getting tired at that pace, but today i wanted to run atleast 2 miles as fast as i could, so i decided to jog for as long as possible.

     

    now i guess my legs still need some time to get fit enough to do so because i jogged until .8 miles which i guess over did it. when i stopped and started to walk, my legs were really pretty much done lol.

     

    So my question is this: should i not run to the point where my legs just feel like shutting down? Im thinking maybe bursts of half that so my legs dont feel dead and in pain. im also running every other day, should i wait longer since im just starting, or was it just a bad idea to just jog that long so soon.

     

     

    thanks.


    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

      I don't have any expertise in this, but perhaps try something intermediate next time (0.6mi) and see how that goes. 0.35 to 0.8 is a big jump, so maybe it was just a lot. Of course, maybe your legs will recover stronger than before, and next time you'll be more ready to go further than 0.35. Maybe 0.6 won't be bad.

       

      I think you don't necessarily have to push it more every time -- if you still feel sore from the effects of this time, you could not push on your next outing, and then push on the one after that.

       

      I think the body gets stronger sometimes in non-linear fashion -- in leaps and spurts, but not every time out.

      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

        I always tell newer runners to "Get to the point in your runs that you do not have to stop running to rest and catch your breath."  When I first started running, on a 5k - 3.1 miler, I would have to walk about 3 - 4 times during that run to catch my breath and finally I slowed down my pace and got strong enough to run the full 5k with no walking or stopping.  ONLY AFTER THIS did my speed get better as my endurance climbed higher as well. 

        So..... Finish your two miler without stopping or slowing to walk even if the pace is not what you are shooting for.  Then you can work on adjusting paces to make your goal of a certain time.  Once you get to the point where you can catch your breath WHILE still running, you will be able to choose paces more efficient and accurate to your current fitness level.

          5k  = 19.48 10/1/13

        10k  = 45.28 4/16/13

        Half Marathon = 1:38.53  Summer Sizzle 7/13/14

        Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/12  4:39.11

        Solo O Marathon 06/02/13  3:52:10

        Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/13 3:40.34

        novacore


          I don't have any expertise in this, but perhaps try something intermediate next time (0.6mi) and see how that goes. 0.35 to 0.8 is a big jump, so maybe it was just a lot. Of course, maybe your legs will recover stronger than before, and next time you'll be more ready to go further than 0.35. Maybe 0.6 won't be bad.

           

          I think you don't necessarily have to push it more every time -- if you still feel sore from the effects of this time, you could not push on your next outing, and then push on the one after that.

           

          I think the body gets stronger sometimes in non-linear fashion -- in leaps and spurts, but not every time out.

           

          Oh yeah my legs were completely done, could barely walk. i hope they will get stronger in the next few days because of that. i will let them rest for a day or two. i think im gunna try toning it down a bit like u said. i want to get as far as i can now instead of how fast so i  can get more endurance.

          novacore


            I always tell newer runners to "Get to the point in your runs that you do not have to stop running to rest and catch your breath."  When I first started running, on a 5k - 3.1 miler, I would have to walk about 3 - 4 times during that run to catch my breath and finally I slowed down my pace and got strong enough to run the full 5k with no walking or stopping.  ONLY AFTER THIS did my speed get better as my endurance climbed higher as well. 

            So..... Finish your two miler without stopping or slowing to walk even if the pace is not what you are shooting for.  Then you can work on adjusting paces to make your goal of a certain time.  Once you get to the point where you can catch your breath WHILE still running, you will be able to choose paces more efficient and accurate to your current fitness level.

             

            i can barely get to 1 mile without having to walk for a bit, not sure how ill get to two miles without stopping. are you saying i should keep doing what i do until i can reach my goal without stopping? like lets say i today i ran .8 miles without stopping and my legs were killing me to the point i had to walk longer than usual. Then the next time i should be able to run hopefully a mile without stopping? and gradual increases like that?


            Roadrunner's Apprentice

              Your legs may not be tired but if your breathing can't keep up you won't get there.  Slowing down will help get the endurance.  Once you have that established, speed will come.  If you're huffing and puffing and unable to breathe regularly, back off on your pace.  You might feel "wow this is slow" but you'll feel accomplished when your distance goal is met.

              2014 Goals:

              - sub-26 5K : sub-56 10K : 1st half marathon

              - Tell my excuses to shut up and lace up...

              Philliefan33


                A lot of new runners have success with a walk/run combination. There are appa such as "Couch 25K" and "5K runner" available for smart phones that can help.

                 

                The general idea is this:  You go out for  30 minutes of excercise. Start by walking 5 minutes, then jog for a minute or two, then walk for.A minute or two.Continue this walk / run method for thirty minutes. Your running intervals should be a slow jog-- the goal is to gradually extend the jogging intervals and spend less time walking.  Slow your pace down so you cam run for longer stretches.

                Future Races:

                5/4/14:  Bucks County Ten Miler


                Roadrunner's Apprentice

                  Sorry, I totally misread your post.  Your legs ARE tired.  Need more coffee...

                   

                  You're building new muscles, especially in your calves and other muscles from the knee down.  It will take a while to build strength there if you're new to running, but you will get there.

                   

                  And absolutely try a run/walk interval training like Philliefan suggested, that will help.

                  2014 Goals:

                  - sub-26 5K : sub-56 10K : 1st half marathon

                  - Tell my excuses to shut up and lace up...


                  Thats rad

                    l would highly suggest running forward

                     

                     

                    coach-T


                      Sorry, I totally misread your post.  Your legs ARE tired.  Need more coffee...

                       

                      You're building new muscles, especially in your calves and other muscles from the knee down.  It will take a while to build strength there if you're new to running, but you will get there.

                       

                      And absolutely try a run/walk interval training like Philliefan suggested, that will help.

                       

                      This is good advice, run/walk is quite helpful. Before you can run 3-4 miles without stopping, stopping for a given time rather than distance can be good. Run 5 minutes, walk 5. Do this for half an hour IF YOU CAN. Wait a week then do 6 4 then after another run 7, walk 3 (repeat 2 more times until you hit 30 minutes). If you need another week, take another week. Getting to the next level in running can often take 6 weeks of dedicated work, but every other day is a good idea for now. Start with what works for you and go from there.

                       

                      Also, as others have said, slow your pace if you cannot make it that far. 30 minutes is a good training amount now because once you get used to it, it will work on speed instead of insurance which is important for beginners, you want your pace to move up at least some. Keep it up for a few months and you will notice some good improvement and can start to think about running more than every other day or running for longer... just not both at once.

                      novacore


                        l would highly suggest running forward

                         

                        that could work...ill try it

                        novacore


                          A lot of new runners have success with a walk/run combination. There are appa such as "Couch 25K" and "5K runner" available for smart phones that can help.

                           

                          The general idea is this:  You go out for  30 minutes of excercise. Start by walking 5 minutes, then jog for a minute or two, then walk for.A minute or two.Continue this walk / run method for thirty minutes. Your running intervals should be a slow jog-- the goal is to gradually extend the jogging intervals and spend less time walking.  Slow your pace down so you cam run for longer stretches.

                           

                          sounds good. ill try something like this. thanks!

                          novacore


                            Sorry, I totally misread your post.  Your legs ARE tired.  Need more coffee...

                             

                            You're building new muscles, especially in your calves and other muscles from the knee down.  It will take a while to build strength there if you're new to running, but you will get there.

                             

                            And absolutely try a run/walk interval training like Philliefan suggested, that will help.

                             

                            Yeah my legs right are holding me back. i feel fine breathing wise. guessing ill just have to wait for my legs to get used to it Smile

                            novacore


                               

                              This is good advice, run/walk is quite helpful. Before you can run 3-4 miles without stopping, stopping for a given time rather than distance can be good. Run 5 minutes, walk 5. Do this for half an hour IF YOU CAN. Wait a week then do 6 4 then after another run 7, walk 3 (repeat 2 more times until you hit 30 minutes). If you need another week, take another week. Getting to the next level in running can often take 6 weeks of dedicated work, but every other day is a good idea for now. Start with what works for you and go from there.

                               

                              Also, as others have said, slow your pace if you cannot make it that far. 30 minutes is a good training amount now because once you get used to it, it will work on speed instead of insurance which is important for beginners, you want your pace to move up at least some. Keep it up for a few months and you will notice some good improvement and can start to think about running more than every other day or running for longer... just not both at once.

                              makes sense. thx!