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Does anyone want to look at my training plan and give tips? (Read 174 times)

kristin10185


I race in SparkleSkirts

    Hello. I am a frequent poster on the "Beginners and Beyond" user group (aka the former RWOL BF refugees), and a frequent lurker over here. I lurk a lot on threads about training and racing advice over here, and am always amazed at the advice and experience provided. So I can't help but hope maybe a few of you would be willing to extend that advice to me? I posted my training plan on the "Beginners and Beyond" forum last week and was overwhelmed with the amazingly helpful advice, and edited my plan accordingly. Now I want to run it by the folks over here, if anyone is willing to look.

     

    So, I am looking for advice on my training plan that is posted in my log. The plan takes me from next week until June 16th, where I am registered for a 10 miler. I don't know yet if I want to "race" the 10 miler or just run it. I guess time will tell. The "big picture" of this training plan is to set myself up for training for my first half marathon which will be on October 12th. I have not picked out a plan to train specifically for my HM yet (that training will start in July....and I will probably be back for advice in a few months about picking out a plan for that lol, but one step at a time!)

     

    My History: Occasional run/walking until summer of 2012. Then trained for an October 2012 5K using the Hal Higdon Novice 5K plan (8 week plan, has 3 runs per week, peaking at 8 miles per week, one 3 mile run, one 2 mile run, one 3 mile run). After my 5K race, I signed up for a 10K 9 weeks later, and began the Hal Higdon Novice 10K plan (also an 8 week plan, 3 runs per week, begins basically where the Novice 5K starts off- 1st week is 7.5 miles, and builds to a peak of 10.5 miles with a 3 mile run, a 2 mile run and a 5.5 mile run).

     

    I ran 2 5Ks in the fall, with a PR of 33:33, and a 10K in December with a time of 107:47. Unfortunately, I got injured (ITBS) 2 weeks after my 10K. The last month has focused on healing the injury and preventing it from coming back (icing, foam rolling, ibuprofen, cross training on elliptical and bike to keep up my cardio, some long walks outside, stretching, yoga, and strength training specific to hips, glutes, and quads). My doctor said I am ready to run again, and I have done a few "test runs" this week, a 10 minute very easy run (ended up being about .85 miles), a mile run, and a 1.5 mile run. All 3 went well, and I hope to do another 1.5 mile run tomorrow or Sunday. I am aware this whole spring training plan will be shot to hell if the injury is not in fact healed, but I like to have a plan anyway.

     

    The Plan: My overall goal of this entire spring training plan is to A) build back up my mileage post-injury, and then B) continue to build up the mileage to put myself in a better mileage position to begin training for my first HM in October. I would need to begin training in July, and this current plan takes me to min-June. However, I have several spring races on the schedule that I would also like to do well in, while building up my mileage slowly over the next 5 months. I don't know for sure which races I am "racing" if any at all, or if they will be more of fun, supported, training runs. This schedule culminates in a 10 mile race on June 16th.  I also  have on the schedule 2 5Ks, a 4 miler, and a 5 miler. What I did is adapt the Hal Higdon 10K Novice plan, and then tag on the Hal Higdon HM Novice 1 plan. The adaptations come from advice from people on the BF, and that was to add a 4th running day per week instead of just doing 3, and to spread out the mileage better over those 4 runs instead of over-emphasizing the long run. I was originally going to do a 10K April 6th, but I decided to do a 4 miler April 7th instead and build up the long run more slowly. The mpw is basically what the Hal Higdon 10K Novice and then Hal Higdon HM Novice1 are, but the 5-10% increase per week is now divided up between midweek runs and/or long run instead of continuing to pile on to the long run and barely increasing the mid week runs. If you are not familiar, you can Google Hal Higdon's plans and compare them to mine to see what I edited. My exact plan is now laid out in my log under "Training Plans." Ignore the fact that I have not really used the log on this website much at all and that there isn't much else on there other than my training plan.

     

    Also, people on Beginners and Beyond recommended I add a little speedwork. Didn't formally put that on my plan, because I'm not sure yet when I will add it and how exactly, I have a lot of good advice already on that, but would welcome more. One of my mid-week runs would probably involve some form of speedwork though, once I figure that out.

     

    If someone is bored enough, do you mind taking a look and letting you know what you think? Do you think this plan will put me in a decent place to begin HM training in July? My goal for my first HM will be to finish, I don't have any specific time goal as of now.

     

    If anyone takes the time to do this I would be very, very, appreciative!

    PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

     

    I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to

      Kristin, I can't say I'm a "racer."  And maybe that's how I remain healthy and run over 3,000 miles per year.  I do have a GPS watch on, so sometimes I try to better my times.  But my main goal is just remain healthy.  I get the feeling that racing increases your probability of injury. But than again, all the miles I do every year might do that too.  I've gone through all kinds of pain over the years, but still haven't blown my knee out.  Today my pace was pretty slow, for fear of taking a fall on the ice, snow, and pavement,  I did 90% of my 10 mile run on.  After it was all over, I felt pretty good.  I didn't have any falls either.  

       

      So far my worse injury was blowing my lower back out last year.  I was running faster than normal too when that happened.  I really wonder if that's what did it?  I really get the feeling we have a lot in common with automobiles.  For if either us or automobiles don't maintain ourselves you can expect a shorter life span.  While racing a car will most probably take its toll on its engine and other parts quicker too.  That's why I believe it's cool to go out there and have fun running.  Just take it easy and enjoy the ride though.  Pushing yourself too hard might lead to problems.  As far as injuries go now, my heel has been a little sore, but I can live with it.

      kristin10185


      I race in SparkleSkirts

        Kristin, I can't say I'm a "racer."  And maybe that's how I remain healthy and run over 3,000 miles per year.  I do have a GPS watch on, so sometimes I try to better my times.  But my main goal is just remain healthy.  I get the feeling that racing increases your probability of injury. But than again, all the miles I do every year might do that too.  I've gone through all kinds of pain over the years, but still haven't blown my knee out.  Today my pace was pretty slow, for fear of taking a fall on the ice, snow, and pavement,  I did 90% of my 10 mile run on.  After it was all over, I felt pretty good.  I didn't have any falls either.  

         

        So far my worse injury was blowing my lower back out last year.  I was running faster than normal too when that happened.  I really wonder if that's what did it?  I really get the feeling we have a lot in common with automobiles.  For if either us or automobiles don't maintain ourselves you can expect a shorter life span.  While racing a car will most probably take its toll on its engine and other parts quicker too.  That's why I believe it's cool to go out there and have fun running.  Just take it easy and enjoy the ride though.  Pushing yourself too hard might lead to problems.  As far as injuries go now, my heel has been a little sore, but I can live with it.

         

        This is why I'm not dead set on "racing" anything as in running all-out. I would like to perhaps "race" the April 21st 5K because I'm itching to better my PR, but I'm not wedded to that idea, especially not this far out. I am willing to listen to my body, not push myself too hard especially when coming back from an injury, and taking what my body will give me and nothing more. I do, however, love races. Participating in a race, for me, right now in my still very new running career, is what keeps me motivated. I LOVE the excitement and anticipation. Picking out my race outfit. Pinning that bib on. All the people around, there for the same purpose as me- to run! Lining up at the start. Crossing the starting line. And especially, the pride of crossing the finish line. Several of the races I'm doing are going to be with friends, and some of them are really cool events (the 5K on March 3rd has live bands of different genres playing throughout the course). Several of them are in places I haven't run before, which keeps me from getting bored. Which is why I hope to run all the mentioned races this spring, but may or may not "race" any, depends on what my body is willing to give me. I also really want to stay healthy!

        PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

         

        I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to

          This is why I'm not dead set on "racing" anything as in running all-out...may or may not "race" any, depends on what my body is willing to give me. I also really want to stay healthy!

          Let me first assure you that it is NOT running fast that would possibly injure you; nor simply running a lot.  If that is true, then 5-hour marathon runners who trains 25MPW would never get injured.  Of course, as everybody here should know, that's not so at all.  There's nothing wrong with running fast; there's nothing wrong with running a lot--a lot more than most people on here think.  Whenever I hear people--people like PT--telling those poor injured soul that they are running too much and cap it at 40MPW, that's a bunch of BS.  Most people get hurt when they (1) train not smartly; (2) run too hard, not fast; or (3) run in the wrong shoes.

           

          Human body is a lot more resilient and adapting than most people ever realize.  I'm a firm believer that, assuming time and inclination allow, most of us can run as much as 100MPW with very little problem if done correctly, wearing the correct footwear.  Most people never get that far particularly because they'll get to half as much too quickly and get hurt and get discouraged.  Also, most so-called experts in footwear have NO clue what the correct footwear supposed to mean, consequently, giving other people wrong idea (myths), leading them to further injuries.

           

          I don't know what sort of "speed training" ideas you were given at other forum but, from what I've seen over the years, hate to say, most suggest a workout "too hard" and not "just right speed".  Just give you an example, most "slow" runners (pardon me for using this term) tend to shuffle along and land very hard on their feet.  It doesn't matter how fast or slow you may be; as long as you pound hard on the hard asphalt, you'll get trauma.  Most people suggest a workout, as speed training, such as 6 X 800m or 3 X 1 mile; is this so?  So you're "racing" at around 10:30-sh pace per mile.  So how "fast" do you think you'll be repeating those miles?  10:00?  9:45???  Sorry, but that ain't "speed" training.  I'm not trying to be condescending; the fact it; you'll still be sticking your legs right into the ground, yet, because of the faster speed, you'll be getting even MORE shock.  What you'd need, at this point as speed work, is more like 4 X 50m FAST; bring your knees up, keep your posture straight, look up, swing your arms STRAIGHT (not side-way), and get up on your toes (more, more accurately, land mid-foot)...this would help you to move your legs more like a circle (thinking of the leg action of pedaling).  Of get to a short hill; say, 50~100m long, relatively steepish...and run up on your toes, bringing your knees up high...don't look down; keep your body straight.  Don't try to run fast; you don't need to run fast to get fast with this workout.  In fact, go up even slower than your usual speed--this is because, with extra action (high knees, etc.), you'd be working harder; you don't want to get breathless too much, doing this workout.  THIS is speed training in disguise.  Once your technique improves, your "regular" speed would naturally come down and get faster.

           

          To be honest with you, I wouldn't recommend following any schedule at this point; I believe you'd be better off just go as you feel and see what sort of "progress" you can make.  If you try to follow any pattern--like increasing mileage by 10% or anything like that--then you'll be forcing yourself instead of listening to your body's reaction.  You may be able to more than that, not even 5%...you'll never know.  But, until you find that out, setting any number would not only be useless but could potentially harmful.  But that's my opinion.

          kristin10185


          I race in SparkleSkirts

            Thanks for responding Nobby. I know I need to listen to my body, and I'm aware my plan could go to hell and I have to be ok with that. I just do better following some sort of structure or outline to keep myself on track. I will adjust if I have to.

             

            I am having a hard time picturing what you are describing with the speedwork:

            What you'd need, at this point as speed work, is more like 4 X 50m FAST; bring your knees up, keep your posture straight, look up, swing your arms STRAIGHT (not side-way), and get up on your toes (more, more accurately, land mid-foot)...this would help you to move your legs more like a circle (thinking of the leg action of pedaling).

            I am having a hard time picturing this in my head. As in "bring my knees up" do you mean doing "high knees" or just trying harder to get my feet off the ground? And by arms straight, do you mean unbent or just making sure I am getting them out in front of me?

            PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

             

            I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to

              I am having a hard time picturing what you are describing with the speedwork:

              What you'd need, at this point as speed work, is more like 4 X 50m FAST; bring your knees up, keep your posture straight, look up, swing your arms STRAIGHT (not side-way), and get up on your toes (more, more accurately, land mid-foot)...this would help you to move your legs more like a circle (thinking of the leg action of pedaling).

              I am having a hard time picturing this in my head. As in "bring my knees up" do you mean doing "high knees" or just trying harder to get my feet off the ground? And by arms straight, do you mean unbent or just making sure I am getting them out in front of me?

              I see what you mean...sorry!  It's not so much of a high knee drills but you just simply run fast and you should get the feeling of getting your knees higher.  Here's a little clip on sprinting exercises (sorry, all in Japanese but this is the one I can quickly get to) and, about 2:20 into this, it shows a slow-motion of Carl Lewis...  Actually, even better yet, about 4:00 into this, it shows slow-motion of Usain Bolt from the side.  Check this out carefully--note how he brings his knees very high--almost parallel to the ground--and, as he swings his lower leg forward, instead of sticking it out in the front but he circles it BACK and as the foot touches the ground, his foot is a full BACKWARD swing.  This is what I mean by "drawing a circle with your leg".  What you can also see here is how they "push" off the ground with their back-leg.  These things SHOULD happen naturally when you try to run fast RELAXED (not struggling like when you try to do 5 X 800m).  If you watch the training scene from the original "Rocky", where he is running by the harbor (about 1:40 into this clip), by a big ship...you can see (he's not much of a runner) he's sticking his lower leg out in the front and he's landing hard on his heel...but, as he picks up the speed, his knees come up and you can see his leg movement turn from "like a pendulum" to "like a circle"--in fact, he naturally stopped swinging his lower leg too far to the front.  THAT is the image you want to have.  Now, 4 X 50m seems VERY LITTLE.  But, trust me, if you're doing it right, and if you've never done something like this, you'll feel it in your legs the next day or two.  EASE INTO IT; don't rush it.  As your legs get used to this, gradually lengthen the distance and/or increase the number of reps.  This exercise would most certainly take care of the "front" part of the legs; and, by doing hill training, you'll take care of the "back" part of it--meaning, you'll learn to push the ground with the back-leg.


              Pura Vida

                Kristin, it looks like your log has set itself to private again so I don't know if people can see your plan.

                PRs: 5K: 25:35 / 10K: 53:03 / 10mi: 1:26:15 / HM: 1:55:02

                Upcoming: Correcaminos HM 7/13, Portland Marathon (debut) 10/5

                kristin10185


                I race in SparkleSkirts

                  Thanks Zelanie! I don't know how that happened. I think it is fixed now?

                   

                  Nobby THANK YOU! That is much more clear especially with the links!

                  PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

                   

                  I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to


                  Pura Vida

                    Yes I can see it!  If it was me, I think I wouldn't worry so much about the speedwork, because you're going to be adding miles per week and distance to your long run pretty consistently the entire time, and to me that counts as the "quality" work.  When I started doing speedwork last month for the first time, my overall miles went down because I wasn't able to handle the mileage with the speed.  But now I seem to be able to pick both back up again.  And it seems like building miles is a priority for you over the speedwork since you have that race coming up.

                     

                    I like the conservative start, but am a bit worried about taking the LR up a mile per week in the last month.  That could be a challenge!  Also a good rule of thumb is to try to keep the LR at or below 1/3 of your weekly mileage.  So if you're able to add a bit of mileage to your easy runs, that might help you get through the LRs more successfully.  And then if you can add just a tad more to your easy runs in the middle, if you're still feeling good, you might think about increasing the LRs a little sooner so that you don't have that big push right towards the end.

                     

                    Good luck to you!

                    PRs: 5K: 25:35 / 10K: 53:03 / 10mi: 1:26:15 / HM: 1:55:02

                    Upcoming: Correcaminos HM 7/13, Portland Marathon (debut) 10/5

                    kristin10185


                    I race in SparkleSkirts

                      Thanks Zelanie! Yeah, you're right....even though the Hal Higdon plan does increase the LR by one mile per week I know that may not be ideal. I guess I just have to see how things are going in May!

                      PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

                       

                      I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to


                      Pura Vida

                        I was just thinking that if your overall base miles were a bit higher, it might be easier to build that LR.

                        PRs: 5K: 25:35 / 10K: 53:03 / 10mi: 1:26:15 / HM: 1:55:02

                        Upcoming: Correcaminos HM 7/13, Portland Marathon (debut) 10/5

                          Forgot to cover one thing; yes, "swinging your arms straight" does not mean to keep your elbows straight.  Often people (more often than not, people with weaker upper body) swing their arms "side-way", meaning, they move their hands across their chest, sticking their elbows to the side and, if anybody comes by you during the run, they'll get your elbow punch!!  Of sometimes ladies stabilize their elbows side of the torso and swinging the lower part of the arm (elbow to hand) side-way...  Either way, the momentum goes side-way; not front and back.  If you watch Ryan Hall running (search on YouTube), he carries his arms almost sort of awkward really straight front and back...  You don't have to be THAT obvious; since our body is not necessarily moving "front-and-back"; there's some level or torque involved; but you don't want to have too much energy leaking out to the side.  A good way to check this is whether or not your foot prints fall on ONE LINE or it moves side to side.  If everything is balanced, your footprints fall on one line.

                           

                          Nobby THANK YOU! That is much more clear especially with the links!

                          kristin10185


                          I race in SparkleSkirts

                            Thank you for the further clarification!Theirs is really good advice...I honestly haven't paid much attention to my arms. A new change to my form I did recently make though was to shorten my stride and quicken my cadence. After the ITBS struck I examined my shoes and noticed a bit of extensive wear in some sport so got fitted for new ones. The person analyzing my gait for shoes noticed I over stride and helped me quicken my cadence. Never thought much about some of the other points on form that you've mentioned though! Very helpful!

                             

                            Forgot to cover one thing; yes, "swinging your arms straight" does not mean to keep your elbows straight.  Often people (more often than not, people with weaker upper body) swing their arms "side-way", meaning, they move their hands across their chest, sticking their elbows to the side and, if anybody comes by you during the run, they'll get your elbow punch!!  Of sometimes ladies stabilize their elbows side of the torso and swinging the lower part of the arm (elbow to hand) side-way...  Either way, the momentum goes side-way; not front and back.  If you watch Ryan Hall running (search on YouTube), he carries his arms almost sort of awkward really straight front and back...  You don't have to be THAT obvious; since our body is not necessarily moving "front-and-back"; there's some level or torque involved; but you don't want to have too much energy leaking out to the side.  A good way to check this is whether or not your foot prints fall on ONE LINE or it moves side to side.  If everything is balanced, your footprints fall on one line.

                             

                            PRs:   5K- 28:16 (5/5/13)      10K- 1:00:13 (10/27/13)    4M- 41:43 (9/7/13)   15K- 1:34:25  (8/17/13)    10M- 1:56:30 (4/6/14)     HM- 2:20:16 (4/13/14)

                             

                            I started a blog about running :) Check it out if you care to

                            MrNamtor


                            DON'T TREAD ON ME

                              Thank you for the further clarification!Theirs is really good advice...I honestly haven't paid much attention to my arms. A new change to my form I did recently make though was to shorten my stride and quicken my cadence. After the ITBS struck I examined my shoes and noticed a bit of extensive wear in some sport so got fitted for new ones. The person analyzing my gait for shoes noticed I over stride and helped me quicken my cadence. Never thought much about some of the other points on form that you've mentioned though! Very helpful!

                               

                               

                              You know what Nobby is really talking about is focus of movement. Your arms don't flail out side ways because you're not running sideways.  You're running forward. The movement of your arms are propelling you forward.

                               

                              You don't run with your legs, you run with your whole body.  Your arm movement is definitely an important part of your running, and anyone who doesn't think so should try running with their arms immobilized tightly by their sides, and see how hard that is and how slow you have to run like that.