123

Your mental state while on sideline (Read 221 times)

dotatl


    Just my 2 cents.  Last winter I ran my fastest 5K and decided that in order to get faster I'd add speed work to my routine.  I was also running about 30 miles per week then.  I followed my program and ran a 5K in March that was to be spectacular.  Well, it sucked.  I strained something in my hip, developed some weird foot-drop malady and limped in 2 minutes slower than my best time.  I decided it was due to the camber of the road and got back to training as soon as I could, ignoring the weakness in my hip.  After trying to compensate, my OTHER calf and shin were constantly in pain after two months.  I pushed through that because I figured if I continued to train my body would adapt.  In the face of inability to do the mileage, worsening pain and having to take walk breaks two or three times every run, I finally threw in the towel two months later.  I took a week off running but tried to use the exercise bike and walk.  After a week I tried to jog again.  No go.  I was depressed.  I couldn't understand how I was running 30 miles a week and 6 months later I couldn't even jog half a mile.  After trying so hard to finally be able to run, it was bitterly unfair that now it was being taken away from me.  It sucked.  I took two weeks completely off.  The only activity I engaged in was mowing the lawn.  During that time I managed to change my mindset and vowed that if I was ever able to run again, even just a mile, 5 days a week, I'd do it and be happy about it.  I managed to almost even believe it.  After the two weeks, I began walking, 10 minutes every other day and built up slowly.  I decided to try to correct the things i'd done wrong when I started running.  I looked at it as a chance to start over and see if doing it differently would end up better.  After two weeks of walking, I had my first run--a quarter-mile jog.  I was elated.  That was 4 months ago.  I'm still only running every other day.  I'm still icing or using heat on a couple of areas some of the time, and sometimes I have to skip a day.  I'm running slowly and taking it easy.  I'm trying to have no expectations.  The first time I ran 3 miles I cried in sheer happiness.  Three weeks ago I got my "long" run up to 4.6 miles, my leg flared up and I had to take a couple days off.  I kept the distances short for the next couple of weeks with good results.  Tonight I ran 4.2 miles at a slow pace, felt like I could have run more (but didn't, cuz I'm so smart!), and it feels fantastic.  I remember the day last month when I felt like "I'm back."

     

    I went through all that to say to the OP and all dealing with injuries and/or time off:  try to look at it as an opportunity to do things better than you did them before; decide that you are going to enjoy what you are able to do; and you will get there.  It's worth it.

      Hey all,

      I've been on the sideline since before Christmas with a stress reaction (precursor to a stress fracture), and my doc has sidelined me until mid-February so that it doesn't develop into a stress fracture.  This is the first time that I've been injured in 10 years of running, and I wondering how y'all have dealt with it mentally when you've been injured.

       

      Hmmm, well I did this to myself, but was doing a home improvement project on my 2-story colonial home in VA, scraping that damn popcorn ceiling stuff off.  Made a mistake of standing on a wooden table with glass in the middle (about 15 inches by 15 inches of glass) and figured it'd be fine to stand on for a quick second as I worked in a corner.  Big mistake!  Fell through it,  Filleted 2 of my toes pretty deep.  And across the whole bottom of them of course, and in the bendy part of the toe too, worst place.  Yeah I am a dumbass.  :-)   Anyway... Only about 2-3 weeks to heal probably, but still the mental part of not running above a bare minimum level in my case sucks.  -- I have been able to maintain a 'streak' by getting in a couple painful miles a day, but not being able to do the 10 and 15 milers is a downer.

       

      But how did I avoid doctors orders in my case not to run?  I just never went to the emergency room to get this thing done as most would. I blame it on the military mentality, but I patched it up best I could, and ran when I shouldn't have, and the etc.  Scar tissue on the bottom of the foot is no big deal in the end, eh?!  

      So I think what I am saying is that I am so scared of being sidelined, that I run anyway.  What would I do if sidelined?  Probably drink too much beer.  

      I have read all of your stories here and I hope that all of y'all heal up soon!  This whole thing of not being able to do what you love (or not be able to do it at full potential as in my case) really makes you appreciate the day that you are at 100% again. 

      The Plan (big parts)→  /// April:  Hampton, VA 24 Hour Run for Cancer (PR 80 Miles) ///  Nov:  New York Marathon  ///  Dec:  Seashore State Park 50K  ///  ∞

      DoppleBock


        I am a horrible injured runner ... By nature I love to eat and drink excessively ... excessive running keeps that in check.  I can count on 3-5 pounds a week of weight gain.

        http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

        2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

         

        RabbitChaser


          12/8/12 to present - IMy last run was 2 days before surgery to repair tendons in my shoulder. The first week after the surgery wasn't bad as I didn't have the urge to run. The 2nd week I was finally cleared to do some cardio and ended up using an exercise bike. The 3rd week, I was already bored with the exercise bike and chomping at the bit to go run. I finally decided that the doc didn't say I couldn't walk fast so I would go for my long walk (10-14 miles) every Saturday. That has been the only thing keeping me somewhat sane. I'm hoping to get the clearance to run on Feb 5th, but it could as long as another month after that. If I don't get cleared on the 5th, that's when I'll go crazy! Smile

          catty


          Goddess of the Cuisine

            It doesn't bother me too much - sure, I'm upset that I can't take part in an activity that brings me pleasure, but when it starts bringing me more pain than pleasure I welcome the break and use the time to recharge. No matter how much I love running, it's not fun when I can't do it without injury and there is no point in pushing through the pain when this isn't my profession. So I use the time to pursue my other hobbies.

            DoppleBock


              I think how much an injury impacts you can be related to how much of your life is spent running.  If you are running 2-4 hours a week or less, it is a pretty small part of your life to start, easier to not have it (I would think).  If you are running 10-15 hours a week, it would be more difficult to have it taken away without a substitute.

              http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

              2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

               

              fitfatboy


              More cowbell!

                I am a horrible injured runner ... By nature I love to eat and drink excessively ... excessive running keeps that in check.  I can count on 3-5 pounds a week of weight gain.

                 

                That's one of the toughest things right there...not eating like I'm running 30-40 mpw!

                 

                Two more weeks...hopefully.

                STILL HAVING FUN!!!

                NorNev


                  my mental state when out of commission: downright depressed.

                   

                  I don't want to see runners, be around runners, or even look at my running shoes.  Everything - from my head to bowels - take a beating when I'm not running (a little bit TMI, i know, but my normal morning shits are dictated these days by a regular running schedule- go figure.)

                   

                  I don't have an alternative activity i even remotely enjoy as much as running, so I pretty much cry a lot and generally become a bitch to everyone i know....

                   

                  That's me, except I was an asshole


                  Refurbished Hip

                    I think how much an injury impacts you can be related to how much of your life is spent running.  If you are running 2-4 hours a week or less, it is a pretty small part of your life to start, easier to not have it (I would think).  If you are running 10-15 hours a week, it would be more difficult to have it taken away without a substitute.

                     

                    I agree.  I was running 10-12 hours a week.  My dog was used to running 30+ mpw with me.  I'm bored, she's bored; I'm depressed, she's depressed.  PT just makes me more depressed.  I'm not really sure what to do.  I have a bike trainer set up in my living room, but it's like pure torture.

                    123