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Quit smoking anyone? (Read 786 times)

    I am the classic example of someone who is working on will power. I quit smoking in Sept 05 and ran my first marathon in Feb. I started smoking on and off until three weeks ago, when I decided to put them down one last time. I use the patches, which help and am working back up to 20 miles a week. Today was a bad day, wanted to start smoking again and quit running, but I mustered up two fast miles today and feel much better now. Am I alone, or does anyone else feel my pain?
      I'm one of the lucky ones who never started, BUT... No, you're not alone. My ex smokes, and his cigarettes are a cruel taskmmaster. You did two wonderful things for yourself today. You reaffirmed that your desire to live is stronger than your desire for a cigarette, and you showed that cigarette who's boss - YOU! I'm so proud of you! Keep up the good work! Janell

      Roads were made for journeys...

      aes


        I haven't ever smoked either but like wingz, wanted to applaud you for your desire to quit. I think that anyone trying, literally trying to move past an addiction is doing one of the most difficult things known to man. Good for you for not giving in. I hope that someone has experienced what you have though and has conquered those feelings so that they can help you in some way. Best of luck to you!!


        Needs more cowbell!

          One of my very dear friends nearly lost her mom to lung cancer recently and my friend is STILL smoking (mostly to help deal with the stress of her mom's illness), but she is determined to quit and is also working out on a regular basis. Just think of all of the cool stuff you could buy with that money you would otherwise spend on smokes...and the health benefits are one BIG added bonus! Big grin You can do this! k

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            Thanks guys. I appreciate the support.


            Needs more cowbell!

              Ooh, and the BEST incentive to quit...I saw those little cuties in your profile pic--I'll bet they'd like to have you around and healthy for as long as possible. Smile k

              I shoot pretty things! ~

              '14 Goals:

              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                You're right. It would break their heart if I started smoking again.


                Needs more cowbell!

                  You're right. It would break their heart if I started smoking again.
                  And, granted, we know more about second-hand smoke, now (I am certain that some of my asthmatic issues are from having two parents who smoked in the house and in the car when I was a little kid), but the odor is still there, even if they aren't breathing the smoke themselves. It would break their hearts...I'm 33 and it still makes me sad and frustrated that my dad still won't quit. After hernia surgery years ago he actually quit for a few months, but he didn't want to quit badly enough to make it stick, unfortunately. k

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                  Gig


                    Go Publisher! I haven't smoked since November 30, 2000. That's when my daughter was born. I had quit in the past using the patch, and that worked great for a while, but sometimes I wouldn't use my patch because I really wanted to smoke. I quit a few other times with some success going cold turkey. No matter what method you use, the same problem always arises. You have to maintain the motivation and desire to not smoke. Nothing is harder. My daughter has been my motivation. I hope I can keep that sense of perspective, and I hope you can too. Now, enough of the mushy stuff. Quitting smoking and running are two great things we're both doing for ourselves. Outside the motivation, there is one tool stronger than any other. Water. Runners have to drink water, have to keep their bodies hydrated. (Especially idiots like me running four miles today with the heat index around 105.) Water is also great for flushing toxins out of the body. And, it's a great device for curbing bad habits. I used it for smoking, and I used it for excessive snacking. Anytime I wanted a cigarette, I drank a glass of water. Later, when I was trying to get my diet under control, whenever I wanted to snack, I went for a glass of water instead. The trick is to always have a source of cool, delicious, refreshing water close at hand. I gotta go now. Suddenly I'm thirsty. Gig
                      Publisher, It's one of the hardest things to do and stick with isn't it? All the reasons are there to make you stop (bad health, expense, the stench, the stigma, running slower.........and so on) but it's an addiction and it takes alot to do it and keep it up. I went 6 months without and stupidly let them creep back in and have recently had the odd few. I know, it's just stupid isn't it, going out and training hard to make things better but at the same time doing somehting which makes it harder? I used to LOVE my cigs (30 a day) for a long time. I now despise them, it's not what I'm about anymore but it doesn't make it any easier to not smoke. When I stopped before there was a little person sat on my shoulder (too many movies I know!) who was reminding me why I was doing this. I just felt settled with my decision to not smoke. I guess it just has to feel like a logical decision and one that you want to make. Once I felt like that I didn't need patches after a week and thankfully this is how I feel again now. It took me a few times trying to stop to get to this stage. So yeah; I'm with you and feelin the pain too. Just hang in there, we know it's the right thing to do for ourselves and our families. Don't sweat it when you feel like regressing! I admit it; It's hard, it's allowed to be hard, it's the hardest thing I've done, it's a horrible addiction. Just beat that sucker feeling up and stay with it. Well done coming this far and stay strong. Cheers, FC
                      skye


                        Publisher, Quitting smoking is hard. I couldn't have done it without quitnet.com. There is so much support there and it will also keep your quit stats down to the second, show how many cigs not smoked, how much money you save and how much of your life you have saved. If anyone needs help quitting join the quitnet and add skylashes to your buddy list.. and qmail me if you need any help! Smile Skye