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Runner collapese and dies in 10K (Read 1850 times)

    It always seems to be only men............

    This is actually so true too.  I've written about this before but, for example, where I live is pretty active and, when I go for a run, I see so many people running around the neighborhood.  I'd say 90% are female.  I rarely see guys.  When I go to a race around here, I see so many guys shooting out like a bat out of hell at the start only to be passed in about a mile or so.  Not s smart way to run.  No training and poor pacing.  Who does that?  Men. 

      If this statement is true then any kind of heavy exertion could have killed him. Of course running will get the blame.

       

       

      “It was a heart attack caused by a heart condition he didn’t even know he had,” Anderson said. “The doctors told her he could have been in a car driving. He  crossed the finish line and that was it.”

       

      RIP´╗┐

      If he had a pre-existing issue, well, what can we say...  Our dear friend, Brian Maxwell, was the same way.  A world class marathon runner and he passed away when he was merely 51 or 52.

       

      Well, look at it this way; at least he crossed the finish line. 


      Feeling the growl again

         I don't recall hearing so many people drop dead while running a road race 10 years ago.  Is it just me who wonder?  Or is running really that risky as some newspaper articles may portray?  Also, bear in mind, if you missed my point, those ORIGINAL 20 people were ALL heart disease patients.  Not those "well-trained" people.  If you take THAT into consideration, I'd say the number is pretty staggering.  Also, consider the fact that these guys turned their attention to running a full marathon (8 of these original 20 people) and they ran a full marathon in "around 4-hours".  Again, the youngest was 50 and the oldest was 74.  Is this number still so very small that you might way this is "fluke"?

         

        I would guess that if you look up the numbers you will find that we have far, far more people running races than 10 or 15 years ago.  More people participating, the greater the chance of someone having a problem....by sheer statistics.

         

        It's hard to make conclusions about their training.  Your sample of 20 people, even if all heart attack patients, is far too small to make any conclusions.  We have a small handful of people having died in races recently, and I don't recall a single one of them being a person with a history of a heart attack.

         

        I always wonder about training when this happens, especially with regards to marathoning.  However I must admit that there have been a couple recently where it is clear that lack of training was not the issue.  I do still strongly believe that undertrained people are more likely to have issues...especially in the heat...but I'm not sure that numbers would back up that one is more likely to DIE from undertraining....since so few people die, I think we lack statistical power to make that conclusion.  I think so few people die that we lack power to say much other than a risk factor is a previously undiagnosed heart condition, and not much else.

        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

         


        HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

          This is actually so true too.  I've written about this before but, for example, where I live is pretty active and, when I go for a run, I see so many people running around the neighborhood.  I'd say 90% are female.  I rarely see guys.  When I go to a race around here, I see so many guys shooting out like a bat out of hell at the start only to be passed in about a mile or so.  Not s smart way to run.  No training and poor pacing.  Who does that?  Men. 

           

          That's cause men are the courageous ones, the brave ones, the risk takers.

           

           

           

           

          (Yes, I'm kidding.)

          It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

            Serious heat exhaustion can be more of a problem in distance like a 10k or an HM, than a longer distance like a marathon because people are typically working harder (and therefore producing more heat). Shorter distances (like 5k) you don't have time to raise your core temperature that much.

              I would guess that if you look up the numbers you will find that we have far, far more people running races than 10 or 15 years ago.  More people participating, the greater the chance of someone having a problem....by sheer statistics.

               

              It's hard to make conclusions about their training.  Your sample of 20 people, even if all heart attack patients, is far too small to make any conclusions.  We have a small handful of people having died in races recently, and I don't recall a single one of them being a person with a history of a heart attack.

               

              I always wonder about training when this happens, especially with regards to marathoning.  However I must admit that there have been a couple recently where it is clear that lack of training was not the issue.  I do still strongly believe that undertrained people are more likely to have issues...especially in the heat...but I'm not sure that numbers would back up that one is more likely to DIE from undertraining....since so few people die, I think we lack statistical power to make that conclusion.  I think so few people die that we lack power to say much other than a risk factor is a previously undiagnosed heart condition, and not much else.

               

              I thought so too, but then it's hard to explain the NC firefighter at the Chicago Marathon who dropped dead 400 meters before the finish this past October. He was on pace for a 3:05, not elite, but certainly a very fit marathoner. The autopsy was inconclusive, but clearly something caused him to slip into a fatal arrhythmia. It would be very comforting if it was always some flabby, undertrained and overweight couch potato straining to finish in under 6 hours, but the last two to die in Chicago were both experienced 35 year old runners in excellent condition.


              A Dance with Monkeys

                Which is why spaniel said, "there have been a couple recently where it is clear that lack of training was not the issue."


                Feeling the growl again

                  I thought so too, but then it's hard to explain the NC firefighter at the Chicago Marathon who dropped dead 400 meters before the finish this past October. He was on pace for a 3:05, not elite, but certainly a very fit marathoner. The autopsy was inconclusive, but clearly something caused him to slip into a fatal arrhythmia. It would be very comforting if it was always some flabby, undertrained and overweight couch potato straining to finish in under 6 hours, but the last two to die in Chicago were both experienced 35 year old runners in excellent condition.

                   

                  Google Ryan Shay.

                   

                  Note that Shay's brother was a talented runner as well, but quit running (before Ryan died) when a congenital heart defect was found...

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                    I used to live near Marietta, GA and am wondering what the course was near the finish line. It can be a very hilly course depending on what route they chose. Not sure how that might have affected the runner if all prep was done on dreadmills with little real hill training. Would sure like more information... sigh

                     

                    Here is the course map with elevation chart included.

                      Google Ryan Shay.

                       

                      Note that Shay's brother was a talented runner as well, but quit running (before Ryan died) when a congenital heart defect was found...

                       

                      Yeah, I was troubled by that until we learned of his heart defect which had been previously diagnosed. I wonder if we will ever fid out what killed the firefighter in October. If someone like Jim Fixx dies with heart disease or Ryan Shay dies with a diagnosed defect, I think most of us are reassured by a known cause. If however someone with no abnormalities just flips into a fatal arrhythmia, really almost randomly, well that's a little more scary. I'll keep running either way, but it does make question how hard I should push it right near the end.


                      HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                        Do we have enough people dying in the ends of the mid-distance races to constitute an epidemic now?

                        It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                        jimmyb


                          It's like my friend says: "When ya numbuh's up, ya numbuh's up--doesn't matter what ya do--you can do everything right--eat right, exercise, don't smoke--but it don't matter,. when it's up, it's up. And you don't know when that's gonna be--you got no control over it--so live it up, brothuh, live it up."

                          Log    PRs


                          A Saucy Wench

                            A woman on my street died in her sleep last night. 

                             

                            We're all screwed.  Well not me, finally my insomnia pays off.  Except I hear chronic insomnia can kill you.

                            I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                             

                            "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                              A woman on my street died in her sleep last night. 

                               

                              We're all screwed.  Well not me, finally my insomnia pays off.  Except I hear chronic insomnia can kill you.

                               

                              She was not properly trained.  Um, sounds like your sleep training is lacking as well.

                              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.


                              I've got a fever...

                                It doesn't surprise me that people die in the water.  What does surprise me is that there aren't people at the end of the races that die.  It seems like it's mostly water deaths.

                                 

                                (I agree with the troubles for them in the cold water, crowded starts, restricted wet suits, etc.)

                                 The water weeds out all of the triathletes that would've died at the finish line.

                                On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

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