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Dealing with camber (Read 179 times)

    Pretty much every year I get an issue in my shins which I've always mildly categorised as "overuse".  It's a dull ache right down where the anterior tibialis meets the tibia, goes away with rest, and exercises like toe curls and pulls help.

     

    I've had a mild attack this week (in the opposite leg to usual) which seems to have been put into order with a few days rest, but when out today I definitely noticed that the tension in that area was entirely dependent on which side of the road I was on and, coupled with a long held and unvoiced suspicion that this was the case, I have now concluded that the issue is pavement camber, which can be pretty extreme in some places around here.

     

    If this is really the case then the long term fix is to ensure that I even up the running on both sides of the road, but I have ten weeks until race day so won't be doing that before May.  So, other than never running on the right hand side of the pavement for the next ten weeks, does anyone have any recommendations for exercises I could be doing for this?

    Do what you want, just how you like. Nobody has to know.

      Are you able to change up your routes and get off streets at all? I ran into the same problem last winter. Can you trade roads for bike paths or softer (like gravel paths), even for one or two runs a week?

      "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

       

      Three half marathons later, I got a number. Half Fanatic #9292. :)

        Hmm, not readily but I will ask around if there are routes I don't know about.  Treadmill could be done, but that somewhat drains all the joy from the pursuit.  Thanks.

        Do what you want, just how you like. Nobody has to know.


        Feeling the growl again

          First, if you are on the road with traffic, you should never run on the right.  Dealing with camber on one side is better than getting hit from behind by a car you couldn't see coming.

           

          Camber is just not a good thing.  Switching sides may help alleviate the issues on one side, but you aren't balancing anything out doing that.  Both are bad.

           

          I run on cambered roads a lot, there's no getting away from it here.  No easy solution other than try to mix it up with things not cambered.

          "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

           

          Chris Pinney


            One if the benefits of road racing, you can run right down the middle of the street.

              does anyone have any recommendations for exercises I could be doing for this?

               

              some ankle mobility exercises could be worth a dabble.

              My leg won't stop mooing.

               

              i think i've got a calf injury.

              jimmyb


                Might be the camber, or it could be the way you're training.  Injuries are often indicators that you're not recovering enough, or your training load is too high for you at this point. I noticed you never rest on the day after a long run, and the run you're doing is fairly long and fast. I suggest creating a hard/easy schedule, where you follow up a long run or any day that is hard with an easy recovery run or a rest day. Make sure your recovery runs are at a very easy effort. If you use a HR Monitor, keep the HR below 70% on easy days.

                Good luck.

                Log    PRs

                  Thanks all.  Replying in turn (except to Chris, I can't race every day !):

                   

                  @spaniel, I'm in .uk, so the right side of the road is the right side, as it were, but I really meant the pavement on the right side.  On my longer runs it's easier to get onto paths that are flatter so I will make sure that I do that more often.

                   

                  @mitochondria, they can't hurt, I will give them a whirl.

                   

                  @jimmyb I pretty much always have a rest day after long runs, but the colours on my graphs for "long" and "recovery" runs were the same, so I've changed them in case they were throwing you off.  I'm following Pfitz which is pretty good on the hard/easy cycle but I agree with your advice, I just think I'm doing that already.

                   

                  Cheers!

                   

                  MTA: spleling chex

                  Do what you want, just how you like. Nobody has to know.

                  jimmyb


                     

                     

                    @jimmyb I pretty much always have a rest day after long runs, but the colours on my graphs for "long" and "recovery" runs were the same, so I've changed them in case they were throwing you off.  I'm following Pfitz which is pretty good on the hard/easy cycle but I agree with your advice, I just think I'm doing that already.

                     

                    Cheers!

                     

                     

                    Sorry about that. I didn't look at the dates. I'm so used to my own log where I enter off days, where yours just skips to the next workout.

                    I'll make it a point to check dates next time I sneak a peek at someone's training log.

                     

                    Hope you heal quickly!

                    --Jimmy

                    Log    PRs

                      No worries, thanks again Jimmy.

                      Do what you want, just how you like. Nobody has to know.