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Vibram FiveFingers... Running Shoes? (Read 203 times)

LarissaJ


    So my neighbor runs in a pair of FiveFingers almost every morning. He swears by them.

     

    Any opinions on whether they are worth trying out?

      So my neighbor runs in a pair of FiveFingers almost every morning. He swears by them.

       

      Any opinions on whether they are worth trying out?

       

      You've come to the right place.  If you look at my log, you'll see that I have 4000+ miles on Vibrams. They helped to do away with my knee problems and improve my form and stride.  That said, you don't just put them on and the world is a brighter place.  I took a year to make the transition to barefoot/minimalist running.  Take it VERY cautiously at first.  Vibram themselves suggest a 13-week schedule.  There's lots more about this on these forums and elsewhere on the web.

      Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

      mab411


      Proboscis Colossus

        Worth trying out, yes, but ONLY if you take it very slow and very short for a long time.

         

        I attempted to get into BF/minimalist a couple of years ago via the Vibrams FF's...took it at what I thought was a slow/short enough pace at first, wound up injured.  Due to a combination of impatience and the realization that I just plain didn't like running that way, even when uninjured, I went back to the "toe coffins."

         

        But a lot of people try it and love it, so I say give it a shot, if it interests you!

        "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

          What I'm about to write is not sarcasm or me being a snarky jerk. Just want to get that out of the way ahead of time, because it might not make much sense at first.

           

          I recommend learning how to run barefoot first.

           

          None of the shoe companies, even the ones I like, will tell you this: if you've spent your life in shoes, your feet are weak and stupid (no offense). It takes time to strengthen them, and if you have the protection of a shoe sole (even a very thin one) you risk doing more than your feet can handle. That's the easy part. The hard part is teaching your feet to be smart, that is, how to use the feedback from the ground to not hurt yourself. A shoe sole muffles that feedback, enough so that you might never learn how to adjust to different terrains and speeds, and allows you to stomp without pain. Stomping in a shoe without cushioning risks damaging your metatarsals and even cause stress fractures. If you run barefoot instead, the awkwardness (and many times, pain) will help prevent you from doing more than you're ready for.

           

          No shoe will "fix" you, unless you wish to run concussively. If that's the case, you need cushioning. There's nothing wrong with that; the body is an amazing thing that can adapt to all sorts of stresses and there are plenty of awesome runners who love their Hokas. But I think a better approach to minimalism is to try to change the way you move, as in run more gently, and find a shoe that accommodates that. THe slogan, Less Shoe, More You is a good one. But of course I would say that, since I'm the one who thought of it...

           

          If the (for real) barefoot thing sounds too weird or too extreme for you, that's normal and doesn't have to be a deal-breaker. If you wear VFFs (or whatever thin-soled, no support shoe you choose), find the gnarliest pointiest gravel road to run on. Something that will hurt if you're not gentle. That worked for my wife (she started running in $20 "fashion" sneakers from Target - no way was she going to do the VFF thing, let alone bare her feet!). The main thing is to not think of yourself as a passenger in you shoes, that shoes are something to swear by. Swear by your feet, then choose shoes that don't get in their way.

           

          Good luck!

          kjkranz


            It's all about finding what works best for you. I ran a couple thousand miles in Vibrams before switching to the slightly more cushioned SKORA Base and have since found I prefer a bit more cushion (but still zero drop) for harder workouts or races.

            RunningOnTheWhiteLine.com

            Social Media Coordinator @ SKORA Running


            Hobby Jogger Especial!

              I made the switch gradually, first to 4mm drop shoes, then zero drop, then VFFs and now huaraches.  I wear zero drop shoes 100% fo the time now, both running and in everyday life.

               

              I think they're worth trying out but as Lincoln said, be VERY VERY cautious and take it slow if you've been running in "regular" shoes.  Here's a great schedule for easing into it if you decide to try it.

               

              http://community.runnersworld.com/topic/-new-barefoot-or-minimalist-runners-start-here-

               

              I wish I had done as Josh said and tried barefoot at the beginning. I think it would have helped my form immensely. But I think I have it fairly well dialed in now.


              Interval Junkie --Nobby

                I tried zero-drop min shoes (NB MT-10s) on the road when I first started running.  The plan was to ramp up to 1.5miles over 2months (3mpw).  I ended up getting what I think were the beginnings of stress fractures on the top of my foot (weird).  I put them in the closet and the symptoms evaporated.

                 

                Obviously, my experience is statistically irrelevant and certainly not scientifically controlled.

                2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!

                  Saw this on Runner's World. Looks like Vibram is forgetting who their audience is by adding a bunch of cushioning.

                  "The demand for more cushioning has trickled all the way down to Five Fingers, the brand emblematic of minimal footwear. The Bikila EVO will boast a full-length foam midsole, which will most certainly soften the ride a bit."

                   

                   

                  I can't wait to see them do an inch thick zero drop sole with individual toe slots in another couple years. Goodbye to "feeling the ground" Joking

                  Runner's High® - Endurance Nutrition

                  www.runnershighnutrition.com

                  mab411


                  Proboscis Colossus

                    I think the FiveFingers and their copycats are just starting to be "in style" now.  I had a student show up to marching band practice in them yesterday, and though I didn't ask, I don't think he bought them for running.  Not a bad choice for marching band, though.

                    "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                      I think the FiveFingers and their copycats are just starting to be "in style" now.  I had a student show up to marching band practice in them yesterday, and though I didn't ask, I don't think he bought them for running.  Not a bad choice for marching band, though.

                       

                      I presume not permitted when in uniform.

                      Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                        Actually, as I understand it sales of Five Fingers have been dropping. Things like these cushioned models must be a response to that/attempt to get some sales back. Personally I like minimalist shoes (when I first started running and before I knew there was such a thing as minimalist I bought a few pairs of water shoes from walmart for $1 a pair, just because I'm cheap) but the Five Fingers/toe separation thing does nothing for me. I did give them a try (KSOs) but all they did was remove the skin from my toe knuckles, which didn't have much appeal to me. Wink


                        Oh roo roooo!

                          Personally I like minimalist shoes (when I first started running and before I knew there was such a thing as minimalist I bought a few pairs of water shoes from walmart for $1 a pair, just because I'm cheap) but the Five Fingers/toe separation thing does nothing for me. I did give them a try (KSOs) but all they did was remove the skin from my toe knuckles, which didn't have much appeal to me. Wink

                           

                          +1 to the cheap water shoes.  They do the same job for a LOT less, plus those of us who live in places where it gets really really cold in the winter can put on warm socks when needed.  Five Fingers that fit your feet barefoot don't leave much room for those toe socks inside them...

                           

                          Like KirkRoy, I found that the KSOs rasped the skin on various parts of my feet, and I didn't care much for that, either.

                          GC100k


                            I think the FiveFingers and their copycats are just starting to be "in style" now.  I had a student show up to marching band practice in them yesterday, and though I didn't ask, I don't think he bought them for running.  Not a bad choice for marching band, though.

                             

                            I think they peaked about two years ago.  There was a period then where a lot of my students and just about everyone in the gym had them.  Not one of them I talked to about the shoes was a runner.  They just thought they were cool shoes.  I see a lot fewer of them now than I did two years ago.

                             

                            update:  i think my perception is correct.  Here is a RW article from earlier this year pointing out that Vibram five fingers sales dropped by half in 2012.  Interesting article on minimalist shoes.

                              I did give them a try (KSOs) but all they did was remove the skin from my toe knuckles, which didn't have much appeal to me. Wink

                               

                              I've got 4000+ miles on five pairs of Vibrams.  I was feeling really smug about my lack of blisters and black toenails.  Too smug, I guess, because in the last couple of months I've suddenly got three toes that are having such problems.  Actually had the doc remove one little toenail, it was giving me such fits.  I don't understand what changed; same shoes, just replaced toe socks when they wore out.  Anyway, I'm open to trying other footwear.  Got a pair of Altras, and have ordered a pair of Skoras.  Still using the Vibrams, principally.

                              Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                                 Here is a RW article from earlier this year pointing out that Vibram five fingers sales dropped by half in 2012.  Interesting article on minimalist shoes.

                                 

                                A remarkably good article.

                                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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