1

Minimalism (Read 518 times)

    I'm 18. I've been more or less injured for the better portion of a year now, only able to run sporadically after complications from ailments which didn't heal. So naturally, I've been using some of this time to re-think exactly where I'd like to go with my running after I get better. 

     

    I got hurt because I thought I knew what "training" was all about. I arbitrarily slapped down types of runs on my training log -- "tempo", "long"
    etc., while all I was really learning to do was how to psych myself into enduring more intense workouts over time. So one day, when my mind said "hard run today", my body said "easy run." Stubborn soul that I am, I busted through it, and busted myself. 

     

    To start with, I hate complex training plans, schedules... and whenever I try them, I do not stick to them. Life is already so complex, and turning running into a giant mathematical equation has no appeal to me. I have a simplistic mind -- I like routines and habits; it is just what seems to work well for me. I would much rather run the same distance every day, with distance as the constant in the training equation, than have to worry about whether I am running a "tempo" or a "fartlek" or such. The improvement that I did make while injury-free wasn't really from following any plan, it was from basically just running more. Were I able to run again now, I know I would have a much better understanding of the necessity of adequate recovery and variation in intensity for development. 

     

    Granted, this approach to running definitely has its limitations in terms of how far I can go. However, while I would like to become more competitive, running has been, for me, a personal thing -- about knowing your own abilities and trying to push that envelope. I'd spit out some arbitrary race times that I would "settle" for, but I don't like to short-change myself. I'll just say that I would settle for not being the fastest, but certainly not the slowest...maybe around the 70th percentile or so. In short, "pretty decent" (I'm sure that definition means different things to different people.) What matters more to me than excelling in one event would be to have decent times in a variety of distances -- potentially from 5K to 50K. 

     

    What I am asking is --  can I simplify all of this to merely doing a ton of running? Or does this manner of thinking doom me to failure? 

     

    gracias. 


    Interval Junkie --Nobby

      What I am asking is --  can I simplify all of this to merely doing a ton of running? Or does this manner of thinking doom me to failure? 

       

      I don't see why not.  You can just run easy 5 times a week, or even eventually 7 times a week.  You'll get faster.  Though, not as fast as other proven plans.  But, you'll be happy.

       

      Go for it!

      2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

      Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!

        I don't see why not.  You can just run easy 5 times a week, or even eventually 7 times a week.  You'll get faster.  Though, not as fast as other proven plans.  But, you'll be happy.

         

        Go for it!

        To be clear, when I say "get faster" -- I mean going from, say, a 19:30  5K to a 17:15 5K. Maybe taking 10 minutes off my HM time (1:45:00) Anything more "collegiate" than that I don't really care so much about I suppose. Thanks! 


        Interval Junkie --Nobby

          To be clear, when I say "get faster" -- I mean going from, say, a 19:30  5K to a 17:15 5K. Maybe taking 10 minutes off my HM time (1:45:00) Anything more "collegiate" than that I don't really care so much about I suppose. Thanks! 

           

          I'm sure others who know more will chime in.  But I'd look at it this way: how hard do you think hitting 17:15 would be if you followed a traditional training program?  If really easy, then you might hit it your way. If you think it's a challenge, then I'd imagine just running easy wouldn't get you there . . . unless you're really a sub-16 5Ker at heart who is just milking his potential.

          2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

          Current Status 08/28: Slowly working back up from a pelvic stress fracture.  4mil distance PR w00t!

          xor


            I think going from a 19:30 5k to 17:15 is quite the challenge compared to knocking 10 minutes off a half in the 1:45 range.

             

              I think going from a 19:30 5k to 17:15 is quite the challenge compared to knocking 10 minutes off a half in the 1:45 range.

               

              Sure but both are very possible for an 18 year old willing to do a ton of running.

              Runners run.

                I'm 18. I've been more or less injured for the better portion of a year now, only able to run sporadically after complications from ailments which didn't heal. So naturally, I've been using some of this time to re-think exactly where I'd like to go with my running after I get better. 

                 

                I got hurt because I thought I knew what "training" was all about. I arbitrarily slapped down types of runs on my training log -- "tempo", "long"
                etc., while all I was really learning to do was how to psych myself into enduring more intense workouts over time. So one day, when my mind said "hard run today", my body said "easy run." Stubborn soul that I am, I busted through it, and busted myself. 

                 

                To start with, I hate complex training plans, schedules... and whenever I try them, I do not stick to them. Life is already so complex, and turning running into a giant mathematical equation has no appeal to me. I have a simplistic mind -- I like routines and habits; it is just what seems to work well for me. I would much rather run the same distance every day, with distance as the constant in the training equation, than have to worry about whether I am running a "tempo" or a "fartlek" or such. The improvement that I did make while injury-free wasn't really from following any plan, it was from basically just running more. Were I able to run again now, I know I would have a much better understanding of the necessity of adequate recovery and variation in intensity for development. 

                 

                Granted, this approach to running definitely has its limitations in terms of how far I can go. However, while I would like to become more competitive, running has been, for me, a personal thing -- about knowing your own abilities and trying to push that envelope. I'd spit out some arbitrary race times that I would "settle" for, but I don't like to short-change myself. I'll just say that I would settle for not being the fastest, but certainly not the slowest...maybe around the 70th percentile or so. In short, "pretty decent" (I'm sure that definition means different things to different people.) What matters more to me than excelling in one event would be to have decent times in a variety of distances -- potentially from 5K to 50K. 

                 

                What I am asking is --  can I simplify all of this to merely doing a ton of running? Or does this manner of thinking doom me to failure? 

                 

                gracias. 

                David:

                 

                I'd say you're not the only one.  I see very many people who feel the same way as you.  Unfortunately, it's like this.  If you hear someone say something like; "Well, I want to win major competition and win fame and fortune and admiration of millions of people around the globe...but the only way I know to ensure that is to use PED..."  Can he do both?  Well, we don't really have a good track record for that, do we?  Sure, you can just get out and run as you feel like and do okay.  As Stadjak said, perhaps "not as fast as some proven plan" but okay.  Of course, the chance of getting hurt will increase as well--as you have already experienced.  So I personally feel that you are asking for two possible situations that don't really go hand in hand well.  As far as I'm concerned, it's as good as asking; "I want to PR by tons without training much..."  It is unfortunately true that sometimes the one who doesn't do anything may end up healthier than someone who follows a crappy training plan--certainly not as injured!  I know some people would jump on and criticize me for saying this--you can just do whatever you want and be happy; what's wrong with that.  Nothing is wrong.  Just KNOW that you WON'T get as good of results as you sound like you really want; PERIOD.

                 

                Seriously, we had developed our Running Wizard for someone just like you--we have the entire training plan (12-24 weeks) out there at a glance.  You know EXACTLY what you need to be doing each day--and we'll tell you what to do each day (including rest).  And we even tell you if you had recovered or not and, if not, take it easy or take a day off.  Whether you actually follow it or not is up to you; we can't control that.  But the whole motivation behind creating this program was to offer what WE would have offered one by one by one...  Now here, it's for anybody to get.  I know some people would not agree with this.  And that's fine too.  If they come up with "do-whatever-you-like-and-get-the-best-out-of-your-talent" training program, I might even be interested in "webernize" it someday!! (of course, thank God I think the odd is with me!)

                  PS: Besides, as some of other posters had already pointed out, knocking 2:15 off your 5k PR may not be as easy as you may casually think.  Even if you follow a well-established training plan, it may take a couple of seasons to attain that.  You may not, as someone else had said; with your youth and perhaps not having applied yourself fully up until now may play to your favor and one day in a few weeks later, you may miraculously knock 2 minutes off your 5k time (and you have no idea how you did it...).  It COULD happen to some people and I'm sure it HAD happened to some people.  If you THINK you are one of those fortunate soul, knock your socks out.

                    So says Jeff: 

                     


                    So, you want to run a fast marathon? Here's what to do. 1) Start running every day. Or as often as you can. Twice a day if you feel like it. 2) Run hard every third day or so. Do intervals if you like intervals. Run tempos if you like tempos. Keep yourself from overdoing it by making sure that the last part of your hard running is faster than the first part of your hard running. The last interval is always your fastest. The last mile of your tempo should be your fastest. Let this be your mantra: "Live to fight another day." 3) Run for over 2 hours every now and then. 4) Do some form work. Strides at the end of a run. Hill bounds. High knees. Butt kicks. Develop speed and coordination in your legs. 5) Get off the treadmill (if you can). It's causing you to obsess about numbers. Learn to listen to your body. Let your body tell you what pace to run, not your fantasies. 6) Don't try to run faster every day (twice a week is enough). Start trying to beat your mileage numbers every week. Or every month. Take a long-term view. You don't need to be comfortable at 7:30 pace tomorrow. Or next month. Work on running strong at your own level of fitness. 7) Running is simple. Keep it simple. Figure out how to enjoy it so you'll stay at it.

                    "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

                    Jack Kerouac