Competitor Group Ends Elite Support (Read 611 times)

    I think there's probably a stronger feeling of "let's help one another" than "what's in it for me".

     

    I run a rinky dink 5k in the Back Bay of Boston during the Christmas shopping season that shuts down the roads and people come out of their houses and cheer on the runners. Nobody seems to mind the traffic fuss for a good cause.

     

    So here's a thought--maybe CGI events have only taken hold in places where there wasn't already an established running community. And so not only were they trying to mass produce and profit from an activity that's inherently difficult to monetize when you focus on the short-term, they were doing it in areas where people don't care about running.

     

    It's no wonder they're having financial problems.

    Runners run.

       

      and if you're running NY, you're not exactly looking for an easy course/fast time...

       

      I always have a fast time when my girl and I run NY.  That's how we roll.

      "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

        Hey Nads, I know a great November marathon that is a bit less crowded, and is less expensive than $225...

         

        I know which one you mean.  One day, I hope.

        "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

          Hey Nads, I know a great November marathon that is a bit less crowded, and is less expensive than $225...

           

          And it's in the NYC metro area too.

             

            And it's in the NYC metro area too.

             

            It's in Greater Lowell.  Don't rub it in.

            "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

              It's true. Sussex County Fair Grounds is part of Greater Lowell.

              Runners run.

              jimmyb


                If you have a for-profit business, the goal is to make money.  If these race companies have realized that no one really cares if an elite runs their races, and their appearance makes no difference to the bottom line, then that "line item" should be cut from the budget, because they're throwing money away. It's good business. No one owes an elite anything.

                 

                It's business. Not just for the corporations, but for the runners. Some runners are better at the business of it than others. They're a product, a service, and must keep working to make sure they're a viable one that will bring money in to those who will hire them. That's what appearance fees are: payment for services. If they no longer matter, then there is no reason to hire them. It would be bad business to do so.

                 

                I just read Bill Rodgers' autobiography. He worked full time in the early days, and after a few big wins would get under-the-table appearance fees (the running mafia wouldn't let amateurs make money), and lived well. He invested wisely in a running store (just recent closed after a successful run). He still calls races to see if they want him to appear for money, not just as a runner, but a speaker. He's a commodity, knows it, and maintains it. Few elite runners are commodities like Rodgers. Charisma is necessary to being successful in this venture.

                Log    PRs

                  If you have a for-profit business, the goal is to make money.  If these race companies have realized that no one really cares if an elite runs their races, and their appearance makes no difference to the bottom line, then that "line item" should be cut from the budget, because they're throwing money away. It's good business. No one owes an elite anything.

                   

                  It's business. Not just for the corporations, but for the runners. Some runners are better at the business of it than others. They're a product, a service, and must keep working to make sure they're a viable one that will bring money in to those who will hire them. That's what appearance fees are: payment for services. If they no longer matter, then there is no reason to hire them. It would be bad business to do so.

                   

                  I just read Bill Rodgers' autobiography. He worked full time in the early days, and after a few big wins would get under-the-table appearance fees (the running mafia wouldn't let amateurs make money), and lived well. He invested wisely in a running store (just recent closed after a successful run). He still calls races to see if they want him to appear for money, not just as a runner, but a speaker. He's a commodity, knows it, and maintains it. Few elite runners are commodities like Rodgers. Charisma is necessary to being successful in this venture.

                   

                  What about the guy who just wants to qualify for the olympic trials or build his resume in order to compete on an international level. He's not a "product".

                  www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building


                  Closed for repairs

                     

                    What about the guy who just wants to qualify for the olympic trials or build his resume in order to compete on an international level. He's not a "product".

                     

                    Exactly.  Which is why CGI no longer needs to invest in him.

                     

                    jimmyb


                       

                      What about the guy who just wants to qualify for the olympic trials or build his resume in order to compete on an international level. He's not a "product".

                       

                      They are if they want to be paid just to show up. The product is their "elite-hood", their body of work, and if they have any, their charisma.

                      Log    PRs

                      jimmyb


                        And if the product doesn't help a company make money, they will cut it loose.

                        Log    PRs

                           

                          They are if they want to be paid just to show up.

                           

                          No. They are a product if they are sold to a market.

                           

                          If they want to be paid to show up, then they are professionals.

                          Runners run.

                          jimmyb


                             

                            No. They are a product if they are sold to a market.

                             

                            If they want to be paid to show up, then they are professionals.

                             

                            Selling a service.

                            Log    PRs

                            jimmyb


                              These companies are telling them their services are no longer needed.

                              Log    PRs

                                 

                                They are if they want to be paid just to show up. The product is their "elite-hood", their body of work, and if they have any, their charisma.

                                 

                                Very few elites are actually paid to show up. At most they get ground transportation once they arrive in town. A few free meals, one being the pasta feed, a comp'd entry fee, a hotel room they may or may not need to share with another elite and a place up front at the start.

                                 

                                I get how capitalism works and I also get you don't shit in your own back yard.

                                 

                                I don't see how $450,000 dollars spread over 80 some odd races and 240,000 people is going to enhance the BOP'rs experience.

                                www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building