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Ibuprofen before running: bad, but how bad? (Read 10660 times)


Jazz hands!

    I know it's bad to load up on ibuprofen specifically before you go running. Occasionally, though, I'll take ibuprofen during the day (often for menstrual cramps / my horrible tension headaches) and then run later. Generally if it's a day that I've had to take 4 or 5 I'm not in any shape to be running anyway. For example, today I took one around 7am and am gonna run about 2.5 miles at 6pm. Will I go into renal failure?
    run run run AHHHHHH run run run


    Ostrich runner

      It's bad for you? I often go 3x800 per day during hard weeks. Vitamin I is like candy if your stomach can handle it.

      http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum


      A Dance with Monkeys

        It is not your stomach that should worry you... < rant="" /> Pain. or Dialysis. Forever. I'll take pain. ----------------------------------- Blood flows into your kidneys in arteries. The arteries branch smaller and smaller until they are tiny little arterioles. These deliver blood to the microscopic unit in the kidney responsible for making urine, called the glomerulus. Those arterioles delivering blood to the glomerulus are called afferent arterioles. Those collecting the blood out the other side are called efferent arterioles. There are several hormonal mechanisms for making sure that the pressure head on the blood is sufficient so that you make appropriate urine even when you are dehydrated. Ibuprofen and other NSAIDs mess with the hormonal control over the arterioles and essentially causes the blood to stop flowing to the glomerulus. This can cause a sharp decrease in urine and in oxygen delivery to the kidneys. The latter can kill off kidney cells in great number. The effect of NSAIDS is mitigated by adequate hydration. If you are dehydrated, the protection is gone and the effect of the NSAIDS on the hormonal control over your afferent arterioles is gone. You can cause substantial and permanent kidney damage. Bad. When glomerular filtration is limited, your body may try several mechanisms to fix the problem using other hormonal systems. This combined with reduced renal function can cause a dangerous increase in potassium and a drop in your sodium. Also bad. ----------------------------------- You never know the day that your ibuprofen or other NSAID you take while running will cause renal failure, and it is not wholly dependent on hydration. The pain of marathoning and training can be expected. Why do you feel the need to stop that pain? Because you don't like it? Marathoning is supposed to hurt. I'm not talking about the pathologic pain of injury; if you have that, address the injury (rather than hiding it under some drug). I see way too many people in my practice and in the world who want to run but don't want to hurt while running. Sadly, it does not always work that way. Don't risk your health to hide the pain. Learn to accept it, to feel it flow through you, to guide you and teach you. Pain is not your enemy. Jeff, a local RA member, a 2:35 marathoner and professional philosopher (really) once wrote this: "For me, racing is not about overcoming pain. It's about as running fast as I can. The pain is just the way the body speaks to you, a side phenomenon. It's silly to try to overcome it or attack it. We talk about the "pain" of running as if it were a single phenomenon. Actually, in running as in life there are many different sorts of pains, and one can learn to distinguish these pains in order to respond to them differently. It is very rare that generating the sensation of "pushing through it" is the appropriate response to pain. My sense is that generating that feeling is just layering one type of pain on another." ----------------------------------- The standard nonprescription dose of motrin/ibuprofen/advil is 400 mg every 6 hours. Not 600 mg. Not 800. And certainly not 1000 mg. Sure, your doc may prescribe doses higher than 400 mg, but you are NOT your doctor (nor should you be, even if you are a doctor). The higher the dose, the greater the risk of injury to your kidneys, to your electrolytes and to your GI tract. < ant="" /> At a low, occasional dose with a short run and with adequate hydration, you should be okay.
          thats funny! i think i've heard that before somewhere Wink (i didn't ask trent to post that squeaky - honest!)


          Needs more cowbell!

            thats funny! i think i've heard that before somewhere Wink (i didn't ask trent to post that squeaky - honest!)
            It's almost like Trent was baited...almost. Wink I think my kidneys thank Trent. I really avoid overdoing it on the "vitamin I," and only a single 200mg pill at a time.

            I shoot pretty things! ~

            '14 Goals:

            • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


            A Dance with Monkeys

              I did wonder about baiting... Wink


              Jazz hands!

                UPDATE: I am alive and pretty sure my kidneys are still working. Big grin I wasn't even aware it was an issue until... recently, I think. I'm not planning on making a habit of slamming a bunch before I run marathons, but I'm prone to nasty cramps and headaches, and sometimes want to take one the same day I go running. Thanks for the advice, everyone. ETA: I reread, and the whole rant plus the "You will probably be okay" made me lol.
                run run run AHHHHHH run run run


                Ostrich runner

                  Well, I've never heard of a glomerulus, so it must not exist. Nogodiggydie jibber jabber. Big grin

                  http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum


                  Lia's Daddy

                    I'm pretty sure that Trent is making that whole thing up. In fact, I'm pretty sure that some of those are not even real words. I know that the pharmacutical industry in this country has my best interest at heart and would never allow me to take something that could hurt me. Wink
                    "Stadiums are for spectators. We runners have nature and that is much better." Juha "the Cruel" Väätäinen


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Just remember, "I don't trust the damn drug companies as far as I can throw them. Seems like every doctor is on the payroll." And here I am, naysaying a drug. Whodathunkit?


                      Needs more cowbell!

                        Hugs, not drugs. Evil grin

                        I shoot pretty things! ~

                        '14 Goals:

                        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                          I went to a well respected ortho doc here in town on Tuesday to have my knee checked out due to pain and swelling after every run. He took some x-rays and told me that I have "a little bit of arthritis especially around the kneecap" but didn't see anything else unusual (I would have thought an MRI would have been more appropriate but I'm no doctor). His treatment suggestions: 1. Ice after runs 2. get new shoes 3. take at least 2-months worth of Glucosamine/Chondroitin (discontinue after that if it's not helping) 4. take 1 or 2 Advil or Aleve 1/2 hour before my runs After reading this I might get a second opinion!


                          A Dance with Monkeys

                            Aleve is an NSAID too. Don't take it.


                            ultramarathon/triathlete

                              Trent, I've read what you're saying before, sounds like very sound advice. The NYC Marathon people advise against NSAIDs before (or even after for like a day? or so) a marathon. But... They say Tylenol is ok. So, acetaminophen but not ibuphropen? Is that the bottom line or is acetaminophen also bad (I'm talking about small doses, not enough to kill you, which I remember from my Drugs and Behavior class, is a horrible way to die).

                              HTFU?  Why not!

                              Coach: Empire Tri Club 

                              Speed Coach: Brooklyn Tri Club


                              A Dance with Monkeys

                                acetaminophen is from a very different drug class than ibuprofen and should be safe at normal doses. BTW, my brother lives in Prospect Heights.
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