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Getting back into it and staying with it - need some advice & encouragement (Read 465 times)

sunkid


    I would love some advice (and encouragement) on getting back into running FOR GOOD this time. Here is my story in short form: I always seem to have had a knack for running growing up but never did it recreationally until the late summer of 2004 at the ripe old age of 37. I ran my first marathon in the summer of 2005 with a decent time (3:28) and a huge sense of accomplishment and runner's high. I "ran" one recovery jog a few days later, which really hurt and I pretty much sat down on the couch for a while (one or two runs a month) afterwards.

    I started to run again more frequently sometime in the summer of 2006 and, ambitious as I am, I set my sights on another go at the San Diego Rock'N'Roll in the summer of 2007. Stupid as I was, I built up mileage fast during the winter and early spring and then started one of Pfitzinger's more demanding programs. A really hurtful (and mysterious - never found out exactly what was wrong) knee injury had me "opt" for a DNS three weeks before the race or so.

     

    So, five years and 40+ pounds later, I only recently started running again and feel confident enough that my knee won't flair up again. BUT, the nagging fear that it may is still there competing vehemently with the desire to one day run a longer race again. Most importantly though, I DO NOT want to overdo it this time and "have to" stop for a long period of time again.

     

    Any advice on how to avoid another crash and burn would be great! I am already trying hard not to push myself as I have been prone to do in the past and I have no real plans on training for anything just yet. One friend told me to maybe aim for a 5k race as a motivator but I am not sure...


    day after day sameness

      Motivation is personal, you have to find what works for you. 

       

      Some people use races, others use their log, others are just able to incorporate it into their lives and day-in, day-out it's part of what they do. The question for you is...what does it take to get you from where you are to "it's just what I do"?  Answer that and you're on your way.

       

      Have you considered an approach that is based on time, something like "every day I am going to do 45 minutes of aerobic exercise" -- then you have some flexibility for walk, run, jog, swim, skip-to-your-Lu, bike, hike, whatever.

      Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

        I have had this blow-hot-blow-cold effect several times in the past .. i am beginning to realize that unless you run with a group or under a coach, it is best to make a training plan and see it daily. It seems to work for me.

         

        Once in a while, see some inspirational movie on running. See a Korean movie called "Marathon Boy", which is a true-life story of an autistic boy who loved running. Its a touching movie and definitely one of my favorite reels on running .. the boy (on whom the movie is based) in real life ran 2:57 in one of the korean marathons.

         

        See "Run Fatboy Run" for some brit humor and tongue-in-cheek dialogues. I love this one too.

         

        "Spirit of the Marathon" is quite well made.

        I dont sweat. I ooze liquid awesome.


        MoBramExam

          If it is important to you, you will do it.  If not, you won't.

           



          sunkid


            I have had this blow-hot-blow-cold effect several times in the past .. i am beginning to realize that unless you run with a group or under a coach, it is best to make a training plan and see it daily. It seems to work for me.

             

            Once in a while, see some inspirational movie on running. See a Korean movie called "Marathon Boy", which is a true-life story of an autistic boy who loved running. Its a touching movie and definitely one of my favorite reels on running .. the boy (on whom the movie is based) in real life ran 2:57 in one of the korean marathons.

             

            See "Run Fatboy Run" for some brit humor and tongue-in-cheek dialogues. I love this one too.

             

            "Spirit of the Marathon" is quite well made.

             

            Thanks for the feedback. Much appreciated!!

             

            My biggest problem seems to be coming back from adversity. I have done really well sticking to my plans in the past but after the first marathon and after my injury, I had a really hard time to get back into it.

             

            "Run Fatboy Run" is a really funny movie!! Big grin Thanks for the other suggestions too, will have to check those out.

            sunkid


              Have you considered an approach that is based on time, something like "every day I am going to do 45 minutes of aerobic exercise" -- then you have some flexibility for walk, run, jog, swim, skip-to-your-Lu, bike, hike, whatever.

               

              I have not tried that. For the past three years or so, I kept telling myself "this is the week I will start running again," which, of course, didn't work. I got into swimming for a while, but stopped that as well after a shoulder cuff injury (gosh, don't I sound like a pansy???). Anyway, the key is probably to make the exercise a priority and not to give in to any excuses anymore. The again, now that I have been out on the pavement and trails a few times and semi-regularly every other day (my log is missing some of the more pitiful first few runs), I am more worried about the old injury (still feeling tightness in that area) and going cold again.


              day after day sameness

                The again, now that I have been out on the pavement and trails a few times and semi-regularly every other day (my log is missing some of the more pitiful first few runs), I am more worried about the old injury (still feeling tightness in that area) and going cold again.

                 

                One of the major advantages of taking a time-based approach is that success is measured by doing something....anything, rather than did I log a run today. Frankly...only you can make this happen. No plan will make you run. If you want it to last, it has to be important to you and something that is worth equal footing in your time.

                 

                Here's an idea...you could post a help-wanted ad on Craigslist. Pay someone $1/day to call you up at a specific time and ask "did you run today?" and when you say "no" -- they have a list of things to tell you to make you do it.  Make it their job to make you miserable. It's a win-win...someone gets some cash and purpose in life, and you get motivated to get your runs in.

                Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless

                   

                  One of the major advantages of taking a time-based approach is that success is measured by doing something....anything, rather than did I log a run today. Frankly...only you can make this happen. No plan will make you run. If you want it to last, it has to be important to you and something that is worth equal footing in your time.

                   

                  I am a big fan of this.

                  "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                  sunkid


                    Here's an idea...you could post a help-wanted ad on Craigslist. Pay someone $1/day to call you up at a specific time and ask "did you run today?" and when you say "no" -- they have a list of things to tell you to make you do it.  Make it their job to make you miserable. It's a win-win...someone gets some cash and purpose in life, and you get motivated to get your runs in.

                     

                    Hmmm... hire competition for she-who-must-be-obeyed, huh? Wink

                     

                    Unfortunately I don't think that would work for me as I am severely allergic to nagging. I will just do the opposite if someone nags me about something. I just uninstalled the RunKeeper app before ever using it in earnest because it started nagging me after I tried it out ONCE by walking 10 feet.

                     

                    In all seriousness though, my problem really is getting back into it once I have stopped for whatever reason.

                      You are kind of telling my story as well. I've ran off and on most of my life. My first extensive running period was in my late 20's and early 30's. This was followed by many years of off and on spurts. I am now 57 and in another extensive running period.

                       

                      I will tell you that I still have to be careful to not over do it, however, I did a lot of weight training and cycling during the off and on years which have really made my legs stronger and they tend to be less prone to injury. I am also a bike to work commuter with my cycling days being cross training. Recently I have been practicing Chi Running and have found that getting the cadence to 180 SPM and shortening my stride seems to help.

                       

                      Recently Amby Burfoot wrote an excellent article in RW about running for life. It was so good I bought a couple of his books. I kind of think it comes down to goals. My #1 goal is to stay uninjured. My 2nd goal is to stay in the game as long as possible. If necessary, leave the watch at home.

                      dotatl


                        I agree with the "running for life" mindset.  I have been unable to run for long distances--I think 10K would be doable but can't imagine even a half-marathon--but I have come to accept the fact that while I may not ever be able to run long (distance), I CAN run long (years).  The fact that you could do a long race in a short time of running is admirable, but you were injured or burned out or lost motivation or whatever.  I think you first must determine if you really WANT to run, then find what will keep you doing it and doing it without injury.  I was able to get to what I felt was a "respectable" weekly mileage of 30 miles per week but I couldn't sustain it for more than a few months and then I sustained a couple of chronic injuries and became unable to go for more than a mile and a half without stopping.  It was demoralizing and I considered quitting because running clearly "wasn't for me".  Instead, I got my mind ok with the idea that I may just be a lower-mileage runner but I could still enjoy it and still be fitter and healthier for it.  After two weeks of total rest, two weeks of walking and two weeks of very light jogging interspersed with walking, I was able to get back on the horse so-to-speak.  Now after two months, I am running every other day.  My longest run has been 3.3 miles and my weekly high 9.4--I would say this with an embarassed hanging of my head, but I have to accept that this is where I am.  I will work very slowly to increase and see where it takes me and be happy with that.  If you truly want to run, you may need to find a similar "place" that you can be happy with.  Good luck!