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Toe nails falling off? (Read 3466 times)

    Ok - so I'm new to running, about 3 months now and have been getting blister on the same two toes everytime I run more than 3 miles.  I have changed from cotton socks to dry wicking ones and have been fitted for shoes when I started running at a running shop.  Now it appears that one of those toes nail is lifting off the nail bed.  Is this normal?  What causes this?  Anyway to prevent it?  I work in a professional office and where sandals or open toe heels pretty much all summer.  This is going to be just awesome... not!  Any suggestions?


    A Dance with Monkeys

      Pictures. Big grin

       

      I wonder if your shoe store is, in fact, putting you in the correct shoes.

        I've lost two, I read that it's from the pounding on the bottom of your foot and not necessarily your socks/shoes (providing they're not overly worn and an obvious contributor).  I replaced shoes only to discover that it wasn't the shoes.  So the first time it happened it was during the leadup to my marathon, and the second time it happened was during a marathon - gone by the end, how gross is that!?  And of course runners are so tough that I was completely oblivious.

         

        First one went through some mind numbing trobbing before that one eventually came off. 

          No, that's not normal.

          Runners run.


          I look my best blurry!

            The good news is that if they fall off you can paint your toe and no one will notice without close inspection. Today my PT couldn't tell which ones were missing. Big grin
            Stacks


              It sounds to me like you might be getting rubbing from the top/leading edge of your shoe over your nails.  I seem to have a wideish forefoot, and will get something like you describe in in a number of different shoes, unless I firmly lace up to keep my foot seated in the back of the shoe.  If I allow any wiggle room, the toes of my left foot in particular end up rubbing on the top of my shoe uppers.

               

              Might be worth researching lacing patterns, and trying a few to see if you can enforce some distance between the shoe and your toes.  In my case, a millimeter or two makes a big difference.

               

              Good luck.


              A Dance with Monkeys

                What?


                No pictures yet?

                buzzardnblack


                buzz

                  lucky dog ive only had one fall off at my first attempt at 100 miles

                  <do all="" things="" without="" murmuring="" and="" complaining=""></do>

                    If it were me, I'd try out shoes that were a size or two larger.

                     

                    Google "ultramarathon" and "toenails" and you'll find a lot of good information on how to deal with toenails that have/will fall off. Most people who've run a number of very long distance races have lost toenails at some point.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      Google "ultramarathon" and "toenails" and you'll find a lot of good pictures of toenails that have/will fall off.

                       

                      Unlike this thread. Undecided

                        Definitely check your shoes for the right fit.  Other than that toenail'less toes are great conversation starters.  Besides, toe nails are overrated in this day and age.  My fav running partner has only one small toe nail left; her's stopped growing back years ago.  The upside is it is hard to get scratched when in bed, lol

                          My experience is that you could probably start a toenail collection. I've lost a few toenails in spite of getting a quality shoe store fitting, again after podiatrist selected/customised shoe inserts, and still again after moving up 1/2 a shoe size. I've just got used to it. 

                          At the moment I've got 3 growing back, and one moving towards drop off stage. 

                          Sorry - no photos. My kids have stolen the camera.

                          Running - cheaper than therapy