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My foot falls asleep! (Read 2287 times)

    Hey, the last couple times I've run, I've noticed my foot is falling asleep. If I stop and take my shoe off, it 'wakes up' in about 20 seconds, then I'll make it another mile or so and it will fall asleep again. Do I need new shoes (they *are* old), or could this be a deeper problem? Has anyone heard of this happening? BTW, I'm new to the site, it seems pretty nice.


    Old, Slow, Happy

      I've never had this trouble when I run. When I tie my shoes, I am careful to raise the toe of my foot to tighten the tendons that run through the top of the ankle. That keeps me from tying the shoes too tight. Also, if you're new to running you might not be relaxed enough when you run. Remember, relaxed running starts in the face. Good Luck with your problem.


      Giant Flaming Dork

        Also, you might want to look at how you are lacing your shoes. On some running shoes, lacing them to the top eyelet causes my foot to fall asleep.

        http://xkcd.com/621/


        Needs more cowbell!

          Arnie, is there any accompanying calf tightness or pain? I have had my feet go numb and often feel like there's a big stone on the bottom of my shoe, under the ball of my foot, from time-to-time. When this has happened I've had pretty textbook symptoms of chronic compartment syndrome. It doesn't happen very often, so I haven't bothered having it diagnosed, since it involves putting long sensor needles into the calf muscles and measuring pressure while running on a treadmill. And the "cure" is slicing the calves open and cutting the fascia that contain the muscles to relieve the pressure. If I had this issue more than half the time I might consider it, but I can go for months with no problem...then it will maybe bother me for a few runs for a week or so, then not bother me again for a while.

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            I remember having this when I bumped my mileage up considerably. I particularly remember it on a 10 miler, but after that it pretty much went away. If you aren't experiencing too much pain, then just loosen your shoes some and run right through it. You're feet will eventually get used to it.
              Thanks for your replies. I ran my second marathon a little over a month ago, and have been taking it easier since then, mostly sticking to trails in the lower miles (7-ish). i don't think over-training is the issue.
              Arnie, is there any accompanying calf tightness or pain? I have had my feet go numb and often feel like there's a big stone on the bottom of my shoe, under the ball of my foot, from time-to-time. When this has happened I've had pretty textbook symptoms of chronic compartment syndrome. It doesn't happen very often, so I haven't bothered having it diagnosed, since it involves putting long sensor needles into the calf muscles and measuring pressure while running on a treadmill. And the "cure" is slicing the calves open and cutting the fascia that contain the muscles to relieve the pressure.
              Yes, I do have calf tightness, I didn't think it was related though. And yes, it feels like there's a big rock under my foot. I'll have to watch it, that surgery doesn't sound very fun.
                I had similar symptoms about a year ago when I was training for my first marathon. My foot would fall asleep on my longer runs, and if I tried to run through it, my foot would start to hurt. The pain almost felt like I had a small pebble inside of my shoe, inbetween 2 of my toes. I self diagnosed it as a Morton's Neuroma (thanks to an exhaustive Google search), and I went to my local Fleet Feet store, where I was fitted with some sticky pads for the inside of my shoes. They did the trick, and I haven't had any problem since.
                  wow - I had this happen on two of my runs last week! It was so annoying! Didn't happen this week, though. I also had calf tightness, and actually that was the first symptom. the foot (whole leg, actually) falling asleep was sort of secondary. but, it hasn't happened on any of my runs this week... just glad i'm not alone! hope yours goes away!
                  -Monica

                  Slow and steady wins the race means a lot of fast people pass you.
                    ChrisT if you're still out there do you have any info on the "sticky pads" you purchased? I checked out Web MD, and Morton's Neuroma describes what has been bothering me on a lot of my runs lately. No one has had a name for it before, but I have met two people who could identify with what I described and they solved their foot pain by not running any more! I know I need to be smart but I don't want to throw in the towel and quit - I've worked pretty hard to get where I am. Maybe I need to cut back on my longer mileage, but I sure would like to explore any other options (except surgery). Thanks for listening!
                      Scout, My guess would be that Chris is talking about metatarsal arch pads that have an adhesive backing. They are inserted in the shoe (not stuck to your foot) with the front edge of the pad sitting just behind the ball of the foot. By redistributing the forces of impact, they can be helpful in relieving the stress on a Morton's neuroma. Bethanie PS--It may take some trial and error to find the right spot, but the pads are often less "intrusive" if they are inserted in the shoe under the insole, providing a smooth, continuous surface in contact with your foot.
                        Arnie, is there any accompanying calf tightness or pain? I have had my feet go numb and often feel like there's a big stone on the bottom of my shoe, under the ball of my foot, from time-to-time. When this has happened I've had pretty textbook symptoms of chronic compartment syndrome. It doesn't happen very often, so I haven't bothered having it diagnosed, since it involves putting long sensor needles into the calf muscles and measuring pressure while running on a treadmill. And the "cure" is slicing the calves open and cutting the fascia that contain the muscles to relieve the pressure.
                        I had surgery for chronic exertional anterior compartment syndrome last summer on 6-29-07. This was most likely caused by overtraining, even tho I was only running 15-20 mpw. I self-diagnosed on the web, then went to a sports doc for confirmation. Suprisingly, they didn't do the painful invasive pressure test, and performed out-patient surgery which left a 1" scar (can't see it now), and I was back to running short distances in less than 3 weeks. I was very pleased with my results although YMMV. They didn't tell me about post-surgical adhesions under the skin at the site (which you would normally manage tempoarily with massage), so now I have to massage the area daily. The problem is getting the right diagnosis, so be careful and see a specialist! Smile Bill

                        "I can do 440 in 220"    Half Fanatic #846    "90% of running is half mental"    If I collapse, please pause my Garmin

                         


                        Kings Canyon NP 07'

                          How tightly are you tying your shoes?
                          left-right-left-right-repeat
                            Scout, My guess would be that Chris is talking about metatarsal arch pads that have an adhesive backing. They are inserted in the shoe (not stuck to your foot) with the front edge of the pad sitting just behind the ball of the foot. By redistributing the forces of impact, they can be helpful in relieving the stress on a Morton's neuroma. Bethanie PS--It may take some trial and error to find the right spot, but the pads are often less "intrusive" if they are inserted in the shoe under the insole, providing a smooth, continuous surface in contact with your foot.
                            Yes! Those are the pads!
                            JellyFish


                              My foot use to fall asleep - now my shoes are tied just enough to feel like they aren't going to fall off and my feet don't feel that way anymore.
                              Carly E


                              Carly

                                Do I need new shoes (they *are* old), or could this be a deeper problem? Has anyone heard of this happening?
                                I'd try a new shoe. That definitely could be the cause. But don't get a cheap pair either; cheap tennis shoes can do the same thing even if they are new. If it still hurts, visit doctor!
                                Running is like Mouthwash; if you feel the burn, it's working.
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