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P90 (not P90X) (Read 851 times)

zonykel


    Has anybody done the P90 program? It's the predecessor to P90X.

     

    The concern I have is with time. Since my schedule allows only so much time for running, very little is left for cross training.

     

    With this P90 program, I think they alternate between "upper body" and the next day is "cardio/abs" or something like that. Since I think I'm getting plenty of cardio from running, I was thinking of just doing abs on those days to save some time.

     

    I'm not trying to get huge or anything like that. It's just that I've heard from plenty of sources that strength training, especially as I get older, becomes more important.

     

    Thanks in advance for any comments.


    Old , Ugly and slow

      Everyone should lift weights. You don't need to work your ab's on thier own day.

       

      You should buy some used weights. start out twice a week.

       

      do deadlifts and overhead presses if you have time add a few more exercises

      first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

       

      2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

      steve_b


        Everyone should lift weights.

        why?

          why?

          Helps with form. Cross training is good. No need to do one of those programs to get the benefit, just buy a few dumb bells and keep it simple.

          steve_b


            Helps with form. Cross training is good. No need to do one of those programs to get the benefit, just buy a few dumb bells and keep it simple.

             

            Not to be redundant, but how does lifting "help with form"?  Running is a sport of specificity, lifting weights has really no correlation to running form for distance runners.  I would concede that sprinters could benefit from lifting, but most distance runners would simply benefit from running more.


            Old , Ugly and slow

              Lifting may not make you a better runner

               

              But lifting improves your overall health.

               

              Having a strong back and  learning how to lift heavy things with out

               

              getting hurt comes from weightlifting.

               

              Running is not enough  for over all health.

              first race sept 1977 last race sept 2007

               

              2014goals   1300  miles  , 190 pounds , deadlift 400 touch my toes

                Couldn't find anything on quick search regarding form, per se. My recollection is something about your core, especially in the final miles of a marathon when you start to lose form and slouch, the benefit of having a strong core keeps your body erect, more efficient.

                 

                Linky 1 and link 2

                DoppleBock


                  Lots of ways to get a strong core - Some better than others.  Heavy weight is not needed - P90 would be good if it keeps you interested.

                   

                  I could get by without any weights to get what I want done - Pushups, pullups, dips, multiple core (plank ets) wall sits, jump rope, stair jumps.  But I happen to like lifting weights - But I have no need to do heavy stuff as it leads to injury (eventually) when done with heavy running.

                   

                  Not to be redundant, but how does lifting "help with form"?  Running is a sport of specificity, lifting weights has really no correlation to running form for distance runners.  I would concede that sprinters could benefit from lifting, but most distance runners would simply benefit from running more.

                  http://a-big-horse.blogspot.com/ 

                  2013 Goals ~ Mar < 3:00, 5M < 29, 10k < 35  

                   

                  steve_b


                    yeah, if you like lifting I'm not gonna tell you not to lift, but I don't see any correlation between lifting and running form.  If someone wants to not fall apart during the final miles of a marathon, they'd do themselves a better service by running more miles than by doing "core" work.

                     

                    That said, P90X (never knew there was a P90) works if you want to get stronger/more cut/etc.  I used it a couple years ago and only did the upper body stuff and saw major changes.  That said for the OP, it all depends on what priorities are.  If you have to sacrifice time running for it and race performance is your top priority, then you're not helping your cause.

                      I used it (P90X) but catered to my needs. I did the arms/chest/abs and kenpo. I steared away from the legs and saved that for my runs, partially because after a couple of the leg routines my joints felt mis-used, not just soar like normal workouts but like they had taken a pounding.

                      PR's : HM 1:51:15  -  5K 21:27

                       

                       

                      MrNamtor


                      DON'T TREAD ON ME

                        Since I think I'm getting plenty of cardio from running, I was thinking of just doing abs on those days to save some time.

                         

                        I think you're cheating yourself by not doing the cardio portion. As a runner you have, I'm sure, very fit lungs, diaphragm and heart. BUT, the delivery system, the flow of blood and oxygen that you've developed is specific to running and mostly focused on the vascular network in your legs.  I bet if you did the cardio portion of the program you'd find it surprisingly hard, and you'll be surprised at how winded you will be.

                         

                        I found this out last summer when i started training for boxing. Turned out that I could run for 90 minutes without getting winded, but after 2-3 minutes of punching, weaving and back peddling, i was tired and winded.

                        zonykel


                           

                          I think you're cheating yourself by not doing the cardio portion. As a runner you have, I'm sure, very fit lungs, diaphragm and heart. BUT, the delivery system, the flow of blood and oxygen that you've developed is specific to running and mostly focused on the vascular network in your legs.  I bet if you did the cardio portion of the program you'd find it surprisingly hard, and you'll be surprised at how winded you will be.

                           

                          I found this out last summer when i started training for boxing. Turned out that I could run for 90 minutes without getting winded, but after 2-3 minutes of punching, weaving and back peddling, i was tired and winded.

                          I trained for boxing a long time ago. It's a different animal. You go anaerobic quickly if you're not in shape.

                           

                          p90 is rather basic. It doesn't have many of the explosive moves that p90x has.


                          Right on Hereford...

                            If someone wants to not fall apart during the final miles of a marathon, they'd do themselves a better service by running more miles than by doing "core" work.

                             

                            I'm surprised nobody contradicted this yet, so I will. I would do 15 minutes of core work 3x per week instead of the same amount of running if I had to choose. Having a strong core (hips/back/abs) is critical to running the marathon well.

                               

                              I'm surprised nobody contradicted this yet, so I will. I would do 15 minutes of core work 3x per week instead of the same amount of running if I had to choose. Having a strong core (hips/back/abs) is critical to running the marathon well.

                               

                              Dakota!

                              "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus


                              A Saucy Wench

                                I'm going to say that when I did significant cardio crosstraining I saw big improvements.  Now would running the same amount of time given me MORE improvement?  Theoretically yes, but in reality I think it would have been too damaging. The balancing out of muscles in other parts of the body was injury preventative.  My body couldnt handle 2 hrs a day running, but it handled an hour of running and an hour of other cardio just fine.

                                 

                                Plyo was good for my stabilizers in knees and hips and ankles.  Kenpo (I only have the P90X so I dont know what is different) helped a LOT with my posture and upperbody fatigue that threw off my form at the end of a marathon.

                                 

                                As for the ab thing...Having had a damaged core I can attest that during the last 20% of any race effort at any distance - weak core is what killed me and killed me fast.  Once the core fatigues, form goes and once form goes everything else falls apart.

                                 

                                Now some people DONT need it.  I say if you try the P90 ab/core routine and it is easy, by all means skip it.  I dont know P90, but I know I am not ready to skip the P90X abs yet.

                                I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                                 

                                "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

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