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Runner's High Experienced! (Read 952 times)


Get Lost :)

    I experienced runner's high this weekend while pacing at the Vermont 100 Miler. It was an amazing experience. The community was great. And I got in a good run. And at least two of the runners whom I had the pleasure to pace met their goals and were finishers. Hats off to them!
    LiliGo


      congratulation!  How often do you feel a runner's high and what do you think make it happen? and how many people did you pace in Vermont, for how long and at what pace?


      Get Lost :)

        congratulation!  How often do you feel a runner's high and what do you think make it happen? and how many people did you pace in Vermont, for how long and at what pace?

         

        I've had a runner's high perhaps a few times. Like a lot of us, I love to run and feel great after most runs. On some runs that are very fast (for me), I feel that high. But this was like no other. This was blissful, sustained for 53 miles. Even the last 12, when it was tough, it still felt great to be moving. I think the night running was the best in the sense that it really simplified things - my job was to navigate turns and negotiate each step on the terrain. There's something really freeing in that simplicity. 

        In total I paced about 4 or 5 people over reasonable distances ranging from a few miles (very slowly) to 23 miles (rock star finisher). Their conditions during these last 50 miles of their races ranged from clearly ill to nearly asleep to high spirited. 

        I'm firmly addicted, by the way, to ultras.

          congratulation!  How often do you feel a runner's high and what do you think make it happen? and how many people did you pace in Vermont, for how long and at what pace?

           

          it doesn't work the first few times you try it.  wait.  that's something else. 

          In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

          http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message

           

           

           

             

            it doesn't work the first few times you try it.  wait.  that's something else. 

             LOL I always woundered what would happen if I lit up at my running Club.  I have been tempted for purely shock value.


            Queen of 3rd Place

               

              I've had a runner's high perhaps a few times. Like a lot of us, I love to run and feel great after most runs. On some runs that are very fast (for me), I feel that high. But this was like no other. This was blissful, sustained for 53 miles. Even the last 12, when it was tough, it still felt great to be moving. I think the night running was the best in the sense that it really simplified things - my job was to navigate turns and negotiate each step on the terrain. There's something really freeing in that simplicity. snip

               

              Too cool! I love when this happens, although I've only experienced this a couple of times. One time I was reminded of the first Highlander movie, where Sean Connery's character says "THISSS....is the quickening!!".

              Ex runner

              a.wesolowski


                Kind of a spin-off to this thread, what is the exact difference between getting runners' high and getting your second wind?
                  For me having a second wind is about just have the energy to endure.  The high is about having a profound sense of joy about  what I am doing.  Often they go together but not always.

                    for me "second wind" means that it requires less effort to maintain the same pace as my body adapts and becomes more efficient at what it is doing. 

                     

                    runners high for me is basically where I almost don't even feel my legs moving and it seems like it would require more effort to stop those things spinning below my torso.  So I just let them keep doing whatever the hell it is they are doing and I just wait until I arrive at home.  Or whenever I suddenly start feeling fatigued.  Which is basically the runners high buzz crush. 

                    In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

                    http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message