1

to race or not to race? (Read 424 times)

    Hi.  As some of you know, I'm just returning from being injured (patella femoral syndrome) along with some other fairly severe health issues.  I'm back up to anywhere from 4-7km four times a week (trying to get up to five times).  However, I'm a lot slower than I used to be.  I used to run 'easy' at 8:30-9:00/mi, now I'm at 10:00-11:00/mi.  My former PR's are listed below.  My question is, if I raced I'd be a lot slower than I used to be.  I'm thinking a 5k would take me 25+ min and a 10k closer to an hour.  I used to be a very competitive person, still am to some extent.  Now, my question is do you think by racing I'd just discourage myself and give up?

     

    MTA:  My 10-11/mi doesn't always feel easy either!!  Gah!

    'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

     

    "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

     

    "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis


    just a simple cat

      race!  Smile

       

      I  guess as you get more bodacious, you begin to lose more brain cells, because there is a limit to how much magnificence your body can house


      A Saucy Wench

        race.

         

        Because as discouraging as it can seem currently it gives you the best new benchmark for your recovery.  If you dont race you will always be comparing yourself to that 21:00 which suck the love of running right out of you.  You race.  You set a benchmark of 25+.  You maybe shake your head in disgust for a few minutes, but then you can ask yourself if you RACED today.  Yes.  You race again and this time you are shooting for that 24:50 or whatever improvement, and you are able to have goals and compete with yourself again.  And celebrate the recovery. 

         

        And sometimes, if you are able to do it, the very act of racing makes you say "Hey - this is REALLYwhere I am " which can make it easier to keep the easy easy....even if it is an 11:30 today.  Because now you are training again for a goal. 

        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

         

        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

        vegefrog


          Race Smile

           

          To see where you are at and set some new goals for yourself like Ennay said.  It might be discouraging for your first race, but after that you will be able to improve. Plus comparing your races over time will encourage you as you improve.

           

          I just assume by "race" you mean, enter a race and compete against yourself...that's what I always do since I'm not fast enough to compete for an actual prize. With your old times you may have been winning races. Just know that might not happen and be happy with your increasing fitness level and improving race times until you get back to where you used to be. Have fun!


          Feeling the growl again

             My question is, if I raced I'd be a lot slower than I used to be.  I'm thinking a 5k would take me 25+ min and a 10k closer to an hour.  I used to be a very competitive person, still am to some extent.  Now, my question is do you think by racing I'd just discourage myself and give up?

             

             

            Well, I ran a 30:57 10K.  My last one was 35+ (truthfully I could not even bring myself to log it as a race, I ran a workout faster later in the week).

             

            I mean, if PRs or near-PRs are all that motivate you to run, by all means, keep yourself the hell away from the porta-johns and ChampionChips.  But somewhere along the line, the PRs are going to stop.  You are going to have to decide if you race because you like PRs, or if you race because it challenges yourself (they are not the same thing).  

             

            For a period, I got ticked that I could run 60ish mpw and just keep getting slower because that was barely half the mileage I had been doing.  I quit.  Then I got pissed at how lousy I felt several months later, and how out of shape I was.  I started up again.  It's been 2.5 years since then, and I still haven't run a PR (it's been 6 years since the last one).  But I enjoy races (most of them), and I enjoy setting goals and challenging myself.  That's enough for me to feel it is worthwhile.  

             

            What about you?

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

              Ok, I'll race.  Smile  There is no way I'd stop running, I was miserable the 6 months I was off injured.  Oh, and I think I'll get involved with a running club.  That may wait til my classes end on April 4 tho.  University has been forcing me to run at some crazy hours. (although it is nice and quiet then, which is relaxing)

              'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

               

              "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

               

              "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

                I'd race. Last year I took 5 months off due to injury and ran a 5k at the end of my first month back. It was two and a half minutes slower than my last. I was just happy to be able to do it again.