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I need running some help! Future Army (Read 146 times)

ChaseB1991


    First off, I'm a very fit guy but I'm horrible at running and always have been. I'm 5'10 175lbs very little body fat. I'm leaving to the Army next month and need to get my running in check. I'd like someone to provide me some steps, a program, tips, anything to get my running up to par. My goal is a ~13 minute 2 mile run. I currently have Bronchitis, but I feel as if I'm at the end of it. I have exactly 6 weeks to get my run down.

     

    My run is currently at 17 min right now but thats with my Bronchitis. Every 1/4 mile feels like a mile to me and I simply cannot breath because of this dang Bronchitis. Any help is GREATLY appreciated. Thanks!!

    Runslowalksalot


      Let the bronchitis clear up, and then just run.    The army's DI's know how to whip the slackest high-schooler into shape.    Anything you can do to get a leg up will help.    My biggest obstacle going through basic was folding my t-shirts into perfect 6" squares, and I couldn't run 1 mile without stopping prior.


      Ostrich runner

        Obviously, the first step is to get healthy.

         

        Next, you'll want to get to where you are running significantly longer than two miles. My guess is that you're going out way too hard and looking at two miles as if it is a long distance. I'd spend a month or so running to work up to at least 5 miles per day at a slower pace so that you can figure out your pacing. Over six weeks (assuming you're healthy soon), I'd try something like this (assuming at least 5 days per week running and mixing it up a bit). Don't stop doing your core workouts during this process.

         

        Week 1: morning alternate walking and jogging 3 miles, afternoon 4X400 repeats (less than 1 minute rest between)

        Week 2: morning alternate walking and jogging 4 miles, afternoon 5X400 repeats

        Week 3: morning alternate walking and jogging 5 miles, afternoon 6X400 repeats

        Week 4: morning slow run 4 miles without stops for walking, afternoon 6X400 repeats

        Week 5: morning slow run 5 miles, afternoon 6X400 repeats

        Week 6: profit

        http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum

        ChaseB1991


          Let the bronchitis clear up, and then just run.    The army's DI's know how to whip the slackest high-schooler into shape.    Anything you can do to get a leg up will help.    My biggest obstacle going through basic was folding my t-shirts into perfect 6" squares, and I couldn't run 1 mile without stopping prior.

           

          Thanks im headed to OSUT for Infantry. I'm overall in great shape, I easily get 200 points on the push ups and the sit ups portion of the apft ,it's just my dang run that has always killed me. 


          And in the end...

            Be sure to get a buzz cut before you go...

            ------------------------

            The GITM is moot.

            ChaseB1991


              Obviously, the first step is to get healthy.

               

              Next, you'll want to get to where you are running significantly longer than two miles. My guess is that you're going out way too hard and looking at two miles as if it is a long distance. I'd spend a month or so running to work up to at least 5 miles per day at a slower pace so that you can figure out your pacing. Over six weeks (assuming you're healthy soon), I'd try something like this (assuming at least 5 days per week running and mixing it up a bit). Don't stop doing your core workouts during this process.

               

              Week 1: morning alternate walking and jogging 3 miles, afternoon 4X400 repeats (less than 1 minute rest between)

              Week 2: morning alternate walking and jogging 4 miles, afternoon 5X400 repeats

              Week 3: morning alternate walking and jogging 5 miles, afternoon 6X400 repeats

              Week 4: morning slow run 4 miles without stops for walking, afternoon 6X400 repeats

              Week 5: morning slow run 5 miles, afternoon 6X400 repeats

              Week 6: profit

               

              You're 100% correct, I do see 2 miles as a long distance. I played baseball my entire life and anything over 90 feet is far to me. LOL. Thanks for the routine up there! I've heard someone mention 30:60? 30 seconds of running and 60 sec of walking? Maybe I can modify it to 60:30 or something of that nature until I get completely over this Bronchitis and can actually breath fully.


              Ostrich runner

                I don't think the timing of the running and walking is all that important, the key is that you don't get winded. If you're getting out of breath, you're going too fast on the slower miles. That's what the repeats are for. Think of running more the way you would weight lifting, except that different paces are different exercises. Running slowly works different things than running fast, and you need both. Doing some of each will train your body and mind to know when is time to back off and when is time to push. Think of your mileage in terms of weeks and months. The higher the weekly mileage, the more you'll get out of the endurance training...but you've got to work up to it. Once you get over 25 miles a week or so, you'll probably see relatively fast improvement. That's why just going out and blasting 2 miles everyday doesn't really do much good...that's still only 10-14 miles per week, depending on how often you're running.

                http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum

                ChaseB1991


                  Okay that makes a lot more sense. I guess overall my problem is being winded. I get so tired and short of breath but my legs don't even feel sore. So at the point of being winded I should either slow down or start walking? I always thought if you were winded just push through it and over time endurance will be gained, kinda like weight lifting. If you're feeling strained and weak, thats a good thing. Maybe this is why I have always hated running and never made gains as far as distance.


                  Ostrich runner

                    On the longer runs, if you're getting winded, you should slow down or walk to get through it. As you get better, you'll know to slow a bit before you get to that point (knowing your body well enough to know where that point is should be a goal). If you're sprinting, you will get some benefit from breaking through that place. Nobody can just break through and keep going forever once you're in the anaerobic range...bodies just don't work that way.

                    http://www.runningahead.com/groups/Indy/forum


                    Feeling the growl again

                      Beef is giving you some good pointers.  Slow down however much you need to in order to get the distance in.  Being strong is good and all, but you need endurance to take it to the next level.  The Army won't just be about pushups and situps, though I'm sure you'll do untold thousands of those.  Getting through the ruck marches is going to take a fair bit of endurance.

                       

                      I have friends who were Ranger and SEAL.  Neither was that big or incredibly strong, but they could run and had decent endurance, and so they out-lasted a bunch of weight room champs over the course of the training weeks.

                      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                       

                      adavis58


                        First of all get healthy.

                        Continuing to run with Brochitis can lead to something more serious.

                        Then slow down to a comfortable pace.

                        you can gradually increase your distance 5 - 10% a week when running at your comfortable pace,

                         

                        Art

                         

                        http://fitatfifty-art.blogspot.com/

                          buy a carton of smokes. they're like gold.

                          FTYC


                          Faster Than Your Couch!

                            Let the bronchitis clear up first, then run.

                            I did not follow this advice and ended up with a pneumonia and pleurisy, and then it took me 10 weeks to get back to running more than 8 miles again (and I had been in great 50k shape before it all started).

                             

                            Wait until you can breath without any mucus in your lungs or airway. From there, it might still take you some weeks to get back your full lung capacity, so don't expect to be running your fastest times then. Do speedwork, intervals, repeat, and a few "long" runs (whatever seems long to you at the stage of training you're at).

                            If you build up with the restrictions imposed by the bronchitis and its healing process in mind, you might just get into shape in time for the Army. But cut back if you realize that your lungs are just not yet up to it. This will harm you less than forcing yourself through it and risking getting asthma or some other permanent condition from overstraining your lungs.

                            Run for fun.

                            jojo61397


                              They'll buzz cut you anyway.  My DH got a buzz cut and they gave him another one and they managed to fubar his hair up anyway...

                              Be sure to get a buzz cut before you go...

                              Jodi

                               

                              PR:

                              Half: 1:48 (March 3rd, 2013)

                              Full: 4:05:40 (March 17th, 2013)

                               

                              2013/2014 Goals:

                              Sub-4:00 hour Marathon

                              Sub- 125 pounds
                              Sub- 1:45 hour half.

                              gilbertholdings


                                i'd try to work up the miles.  when you can easily run 10 miles, you can probably run 2 much faster than if 2 miles is your limit.  plus the distance will probably help with army training.  i doubt they're going to only make you run 2 miles a day.

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