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Lighten up, it's just running (Read 1564 times)

    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

      She had me at "“There is good evidence that your body is exquisitely lazy...", but this is an added bonus:

       

      "Dr. Steef Bredeweg of the University Medical Center Groningen, in the Netherlands, and his colleague Dr. Ida Buist..." sounds like part of a Monty Python skit.

      E.J.
      Greater Lowell Road Runners
      Cry havoc and let slip the dawgs of war!

      May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be always at your back, may the sun shine warm upon your SPF30, may the rains fall soft upon your sweat-wicking hat, and until you hit the finish line may The Flying Spaghetti Monster hold you in the hollow of His Noodly Appendage.

        "When the researchers tried to figure out how to prevent the injuries, they learned that the only thing associated with running injuries was, in fact, running. The more people ran, the more likely it was that they would become injured. "

         

        That's lousy logic if I've ever seen it.

         

        Also, I don't think it's true--except among beginning runners.

        It should be mathematical, but it's not.

          Also, I don't think it's true--except among beginning runners.

           

          In my personal experience, I agree with this.  For the first couple years I got injured frequently, but I have been remarkably healthy for the last couple.  I think two things happened:  1)  My body had time (months and years) to adapt to the stress, joints, tendons, muscles all bulked up.  2)  I learned to understand what my body was telling me.  After a couple years you become much more sensitive to the signals that are telling you to lighten up for a day or two.  I don't think beginner runners "hear" their body as well. 

          Whatever my lot, thou hast taught me to say, It is well, it is well with my soul.


          Imminent Catastrophe

            "...there is nothing like starting your Saturday morning being beaten by 75-year-old men and passed at the finish line by 8-year-old kids. It is quite humbling.”

             

            I feel his pain.

            "Able to function despite imminent catastrophe"

             "To obtain the air that angels breathe you must come to Tahoe"--Mark Twain

            "The most common question from potential entrants is 'I do not know if I can do this' to which I usually answer, 'that's the whole point'.--Paul Charteris, Tarawera Ultramarathon RD.

             

            √ Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 20/21 July 2013

            Boston Marathon 21 April 2014

            Tahoe Rim Trail 100M 19/20 July 2014


            HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

              "When the researchers tried to figure out how to prevent the injuries, they learned that the only thing associated with running injuries was, in fact, running. The more people ran, the more likely it was that they would become injured. "

               ...

               

              What about breathing hard?

               

              What about sweating?

               

              Maybe those are associated too. Maybe those are bad too.

              It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

              rebelrace


                want something different to keep running fun: try rebel race. this journey wil have u laughing, mud crawling, tunnel crawling, fire jumping, beer drinking all weekend long!  ps  wear a costume

                  I think rebelrace has a point.  It's probably all the tunnel crawling and fire jumping that's injuring these new runners.  

                  "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

                  Jack Kerouac


                  Needs more cowbell!

                    I think rebelrace has a point.  It's probably all the tunnel crawling and fire jumping that's injuring these new runners.  

                     

                    Or beer drinking...

                    I shoot pretty things! ~

                    '14 Goals:

                    • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                      You could just do nothing all day physically.  That's a great way to avoid injuries to your legs.  You only have to worry about a higher chance of heart attack, stroke, cancer, diabetes, morbid obesity, high blood pressure, and some other minor ailments.

                         I don't think beginner runners "hear" their body as well. 

                         

                        +1

                         

                        And some people take longer than others. Speaking on a personal note. Blush 

                        Suffering Benefiting from mature onset exercise addiction and low aerobic endorphin release threshold. Hoping there is no cure.

                          She had me at "“There is good evidence that your body is exquisitely lazy...", but this is an added bonus:

                           

                          "Dr. Steef Bredeweg of the University Medical Center Groningen, in the Netherlands, and his colleague Dr. Ida Buist..." sounds like part of a Monty Python skit.

                          This they now do.

                          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                            In my personal experience, I agree with this.  For the first couple years I got injured frequently, but I have been remarkably healthy for the last couple.  I think two things happened:  1)  My body had time (months and years) to adapt to the stress, joints, tendons, muscles all bulked up.  2)  I learned to understand what my body was telling me.  After a couple years you become much more sensitive to the signals that are telling you to lighten up for a day or two.  I don't think beginner runners "hear" their body as well. 

                             

                            I think most new runners, if they have a competitive background in other sports, would automatically have a tendency to over-train and push too hard every day.  In most other sports you really push yourself hard, every day.  You can't do that in running and last very long. 


                            Feeling the growl again

                              She had me at "“There is good evidence that your body is exquisitely lazy...", but this is an added bonus:

                                

                               

                              The human mind and mody is WONDERFUL at figuring out how to do things with the least amount of energy expenditure required.  The first time I jumped up to running 90-100mpw consistently...from, like 50-60mpw...I was tired and hurting all the time (not injured, just hurting like an SOB all over).  Wouldn't you know it, within a few weeks my form started changing.  Stride shortened, more shuffling-type stride at the same speed.  My body started figuring out ways to save energy and reduce impact forces to spare itself.

                               

                              Of course, it took a couple years to get from being able to survive on this training to truly, truly thriving on it...strength and other adaptations take time.

                               

                              Regarding the "the only thing that correlates with injury from running is running" idiocy...the best analogy I can think of is to tell somebody that they should avoid ever getting close to other people because they might have their heart broken.  In both cases it is assinine to give up on doing something so good for you and rewarding because their may be some boo-boos along the way.

                              "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                               

                                I think most new runners, if they have a competitive background in other sports, would automatically have a tendency to over-train and push too hard every day.  In most other sports you really push yourself hard, every day.  You can't do that in running and last very long. 

                                 

                                This is a very good point. I do a lot of my running on multi-use trails and I see a lot of beginners. Now, I'm far from being fast so it's not a particularly big deal to pass me but when I get passed by many new runners they seem like they're deep into oxygen debt and just short of a heart attack. I wonder if the multi-use trail makes it even harder for a competitive minded new runner to keep it up long enough to really become a runner.

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