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Low Light Running Survey (Read 282 times)

mab411


Proboscis Colossus

     

     

    Haven't been bitten by a dog, although several have followed me while running. Drivers probably were thinking "What's that guy doing letting his dog run around in the street - and with no leash?".  

     

    I've had this exact thing happen before.  Beautiful bloodhound, came out of nowhere and followed me for like, 13 miles.  All the way home, where he hung around until next morning's run and followed me for most of that one, too.

     

    I was glad of the company, but jeez...there's about 50 yards where I'm on the shoulder of a state highway.  That was unpleasant.

    "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people


    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

       

      Only 20 questions or so!  Should take around 5 minutes.

       

       

      Thank you!  I hope to be able to give back to you all in some fashion.  If not a $20 (or $50!) gift card, maybe we can design something very useful for you.

       

       

      That's been our experiences as well.  Some of these lighting systems just have a single blinking red LED, which almost invites the attention and curiosity of drivers.  Something that outlines the runner, as you say, seems like it would be much more helpful in letting drivers know it's an actual person.

       

      Please fix your post -- your "quotes" are inaccurate -- those are not things I posted.

      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

      PSURunningTech


        My apologies AmoresPerros.  I was trying to quote multiple people in my post and must've accidentally copied over your PID information.  It's fixed now.

          I've gotten nipped once by our neighbors' dog.  I called them to let them know.  Then the dogs kept getting out of their electric fence.  When I called again, the owner said, "Oh, yeah, well, when it's snowy, the electric fence doesn't work and they get out..."  And that's MY problem??  Then I saw them out periodically during the summer.  Called again.  The woman asked how often it was happening, and I said, "Oh, every week or two."  "WELL, I don't think it's happening that much!"  Then my daughter's friend got nipped TWICE.  I was about ready to call the police, when our neighborhood all got an email from the people, saying they'd given the two dogs away. After that, I learned that one of their dogs had nipped a four-year-old on her trike.  The dog's owner is a state representative whom I will not be supporting in the next election.  (Side note:  Maine's legislature has over 180 members - it's the same size as Texas'.  Ridiculous.)

          denmermr


            Most of my running this winter has been at night. Evenings when my toddlers are in bed is about my only free time to run, and there's not a lot of late-evening light in Alaska in the winter. (By contrast, in June I will often start runs at 10:00 PM or later and still run in the daylight).

            My typical running routes at night follow neighborhood roads for a short while, and then bike paths (generally snow plowed down to a hard surface within a few days after new snow). My visibility to traffic in my routes is generally not much of an issue.

            Visibility of the trail conditions is my main concern. Someone suggested a flying robot illuminating the trail ahead as they run - great idea (if a bit silly and over the top). On a more practical note, and headlamp that was super light, super bright, and didn't bounce too much while pounding the pavement would be nice.

            A better headlamp would probably help with my other night-running hazard - spotting moose. Moose aren't particularly aggressive, but they are really big and can be dangerous if spooked (or if you a get between a momma and her calf). Several times I've passed moose within 1-2 steps of my path and not noticed them until I was directly next to them. I've taken to looking far ahead and watching for my headlamp to reflect off the back of their eyes in the distance - but that leaves me vulnerable to trail hazards at my feet.

            Anecdotally I find that my night running pace is about 30 seconds per mile slower than my daylight running pace under similar conditions.

            PSURunningTech


              Most of my running this winter has been at night. Evenings when my toddlers are in bed is about my only free time to run, and there's not a lot of late-evening light in Alaska in the winter. (By contrast, in June I will often start runs at 10:00 PM or later and still run in the daylight).

              My typical running routes at night follow neighborhood roads for a short while, and then bike paths (generally snow plowed down to a hard surface within a few days after new snow). My visibility to traffic in my routes is generally not much of an issue.

              Visibility of the trail conditions is my main concern. Someone suggested a flying robot illuminating the trail ahead as they run - great idea (if a bit silly and over the top). On a more practical note, and headlamp that was super light, super bright, and didn't bounce too much while pounding the pavement would be nice.

              A better headlamp would probably help with my other night-running hazard - spotting moose. Moose aren't particularly aggressive, but they are really big and can be dangerous if spooked (or if you a get between a momma and her calf). Several times I've passed moose within 1-2 steps of my path and not noticed them until I was directly next to them. I've taken to looking far ahead and watching for my headlamp to reflect off the back of their eyes in the distance - but that leaves me vulnerable to trail hazards at my feet.

              Anecdotally I find that my night running pace is about 30 seconds per mile slower than my daylight running pace under similar conditions.

               

              Thank you for your response!  That's some great insight into the mind of a low light runner.  So visibility to traffic/bikers/pedestrians is not much of a concern of yours then?  Is that because you just naturally feel safe on your route or because you think your visibility gear (whatever it is you may wear) is sufficient?

               

              What's wrong with the headlamp you current run with?  It sounds like you don't feel it's bright enough, light enough, or fits well enough.  Have you tried many other headlamps?

               

              Thanks once again for taking the time to respond here.

                (Side note:  Maine's legislature has over 180 members - it's the same size as Texas'.  Ridiculous.)

                Ha. Try NH.  400 in the house, about 1 for every 3,500 residents.  Only larger legislative bodies are US House and UK House of Commons.

                Race Plan: 8/21/14 - Saunders at Rye Harbor 10K - Goal: Sub 60 ** 10/26/14 - Loco Half - Goal: Sub 2:15 (cutoff)

                Old Lady PRs: 5K 29:25 10/26/13 *** 10K ~1:01:30 4/27/14  1:05:37 1/1/14   ***  HS-CC PR: 5K 22:28

                Gator eye


                  I run probably 90 percent of my runs in the dark and use a headlight in cold weather and knuckle lights in warm weather. (the switches on my knuckle lights don't work in the cold and getting a response out of them has been damn near impossible)  Anyway I like the headlight but if wearing a ball cap you get this shaded spot from the rim of the hat which isn't bad till I get over 10 miles and then the weird lighting just starts messing with me. The knuckle lights are good for the road but not near bright enough for a trail or two track.

                  I would like to try some sort of belt with a light on the front. I think it could be the best of both worlds if the belt was comfortable and didn't bounce to bad.

                  mab411


                  Proboscis Colossus

                    I run probably 90 percent of my runs in the dark and use a headlight in cold weather and knuckle lights in warm weather. (the switches on my knuckle lights don't work in the cold and getting a response out of them has been damn near impossible)  Anyway I like the headlight but if wearing a ball cap you get this shaded spot from the rim of the hat which isn't bad till I get over 10 miles and then the weird lighting just starts messing with me. The knuckle lights are good for the road but not near bright enough for a trail or two track.

                    I would like to try some sort of belt with a light on the front. I think it could be the best of both worlds if the belt was comfortable and didn't bounce to bad.

                     

                    Depending on how long ago you purchased them, you might try e-mailing Knucklelights about your problem.  I was having a different issue with mine, and the response from the head of the company was very fast, as was his willingness to send me a new set.

                    "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                    SillyC


                        Anyway I like the headlight but if wearing a ball cap you get this shaded spot from the rim of the hat which isn't bad till I get over 10 miles and then the weird lighting just starts messing with me.

                       

                      Serious question - but why are you wearing a ball cap at night?  I think that's what the brim is supposed to do - filter light.

                      I will wear one when I've been running before dark AND after dark, in which case I flip the ball cap around.  Dorky, but it's dark so nobody sees you. Last time I ran a race that started an hour before sunrise, and everybody else was wearing the ball cap backwards too.

                       

                      I ran a night race in Texas and the sweatband under the headlamp was really popular.

                        Ha. Try NH.  400 in the house, about 1 for every 3,500 residents.  Only larger legislative bodies are US House and UK House of Commons.

                         

                        A few years ago, I made up a chart to compare the sizes of state legislatures.  I noticed that New Hampshire was about the only one more ridiculous than Maine's!

                        But somehow, NH manages to keep its tax burden low, while ours is one of the worst in the country.

                           

                          Serious question - but why are you wearing a ball cap at night?  I think that's what the brim is supposed to do - filter light.

                          I will wear one when I've been running before dark AND after dark, in which case I flip the ball cap around.  Dorky, but it's dark so nobody sees you. Last time I ran a race that started an hour before sunrise, and everybody else was wearing the ball cap backwards too.

                           

                          I ran a night race in Texas and the sweatband under the headlamp was really popular.

                           

                          I never run at night unless I'm racing something like the Hood to Coast Relay - but when I DO run at night I wear my running hat to help protect my eyes from the blinding headlights of oncoming traffic.

                          Chris Pinney


                            Most of my running this winter has been at night. Evenings when my toddlers are in bed is about my only free time to run, and there's not a lot of late-evening light in Alaska in the winter. (By contrast, in June I will often start runs at 10:00 PM or later and still run in the daylight).

                            My typical running routes at night follow neighborhood roads for a short while, and then bike paths (generally snow plowed down to a hard surface within a few days after new snow). My visibility to traffic in my routes is generally not much of an issue.

                            Visibility of the trail conditions is my main concern. Someone suggested a flying robot illuminating the trail ahead as they run - great idea (if a bit silly and over the top). On a more practical note, and headlamp that was super light, super bright, and didn't bounce too much while pounding the pavement would be nice.

                            A better headlamp would probably help with my other night-running hazard - spotting moose. Moose aren't particularly aggressive, but they are really big and can be dangerous if spooked (or if you a get between a momma and her calf). Several times I've passed moose within 1-2 steps of my path and not noticed them until I was directly next to them. I've taken to looking far ahead and watching for my headlamp to reflect off the back of their eyes in the distance - but that leaves me vulnerable to trail hazards at my feet.

                            Anecdotally I find that my night running pace is about 30 seconds per mile slower than my daylight running pace under similar conditions.

                            Hi, I posted the flying robot comment and although I would love to have one, I realize it might be a little costly. Maybe Amazon will sell a consumer version of their little delivery devices someday. On a serious note, how about two "head" lamps. One on your head for 15-25 feet ahead and one worn as you would a heartrate monitor (sternum) to illuminate your footstrike.

                             

                            I too notice that my perceived pace is faster at night. I think its because all of your visual references are close by.

                            SillyC


                               

                              I never run at night unless I'm racing something like the Hood to Coast Relay - but when I DO run at night I wear my running hat to help protect my eyes from the blinding headlights of oncoming traffic.

                               

                              Ah, gotcha.  This is not typically a problem for me.

                                Actually, having something hovering overhead shining a searchlight down at me would make me very, very nervous.

                                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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