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Bike (Read 1367 times)


A Dance with Monkeys

    Okay, I am totally new to this biking thing. Biked home from work today, 97 degrees, 8 miles, 35 minutes, gently rolling with some traffic stops. Pack on my back. I have NO idea what kinds of paces I should shoot for or expect. Any framwork that somebody could provide would be helpful. My legs felt funny after I was done Big grin


    Team HTFU NCTR Driver

      OK, Mr. Eight Marathons Last Year, you'll be pleased to know that the only muscles that you'll use the same way on the bike are your heart and your diaphragm! There's just no good way to equate running and biking, and "they" say that, if you bike 8 hours a week, it'll take three years to reach the best fitness you can reach by biking 8 hours a week (in other words, to improve from there, you'll have to add more riding time). I'd guess that your cardiovascular fitness is such that a heart rate monitor wouldn't do much for you until you get some bike-specific strength. My comfortable training pace, which I can maintain pretty easily and carry on a decent conversation, is roughly 18 mph. My solo rides typically average anywhere from 16-19 miles an hour; for the 100 mile ride I did end of July, I averaged 17. I have run zero marathons, but I do have 27" quads. YMMV. I never really shoot for a pace; I find that just going by feel works just fine - and you can totally change one portion of a ride without messing up the rest of it. It takes me a solid 10 miles to feel warmed-up; then, almost anything goes - continue loafing along, go find some hills and see if I can get my heart to explode, chase cars, go long, hold a tempo, try to get lost, whatever. My suggestion would be to focus on being smooth and relaxed on the bike. Keep your cadence up - shoot for 90-100 rpm - and pick your gear to set your effort level. Mostly, though, just have fun. Everything else will take care of itself. did




      A Dance with Monkeys

        Big grin Thanks! Did I mention, my legs felt WEIRD when I got off the thing?!?


        Team HTFU NCTR Driver

          Big grin Thanks! Did I mention, my legs felt WEIRD when I got off the thing?!?
          The whack thing about biking is that, despite being generally less intense than running, you can ride yourself further into exhaustion than you can run yourself. Eventually, running, you'll just fall over. You can bike beyond that point, since your legs aren't holding you up. Come to a complete stop, and you just sort of turn into a puddle - it's like your bones stop working. Keep it up, and join a group ride. It's a whole new world, tucking into a draft and realizing you're going 24 mph and having to soft-pedal to keep from gettin' way too intimate with the person in front of you. Oohhh, and then there's a stop-sign sprint... did




          A Dance with Monkeys

            Stop sign sprint? I can see getting so weary that you melt without knowing it. Running is the opposite. Often while running my legs won't go any more even thought I know something is left... I still have to figure out the gears.
              Is that you?

              Vim


              Team HTFU NCTR Driver

                Or is THIS you? did




                Team HTFU NCTR Driver

                  Stop sign sprint? I can see getting so weary that you melt without knowing it. Running is the opposite. Often while running my legs won't go any more even thought I know something is left... I still have to figure out the gears.
                  MUST.BE.FIRST.TO.RANDOM.SIGN.AHEAD!!!! AIIIIEEEEEEEYYAAAGHA! Top gear, head down, butt up, legs cranking, try to hold a draft and then slingshot by at the last moment at 37 mph for HONOR AND GLORY!!!! It'll take you longer to wipe the grin off your face than it'll take you to recover from the effort. did



                    I installed these water bottles on my bike. Now my legs always feel funny after I ride.

                     


                    Needs more cowbell!

                      That bike is missing a trail-a-bike for me!

                      I shoot pretty things! ~

                      '14 Goals:

                      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                      Saint Olethros


                        The weird feeling is that you are using different muscles than what you are used to, if you want to get rid of it or actually make it less noticeable is to run right after you get off the bike once/twice a week, yes it's more of a Tri/Du workout than a running one but after a medium ride my legs actually look to go running

                         

                         

                        I don't recommend doing this after a super long ride unless you are Iroman training

                         

                        my point is, after I got used to running after biking, my legs no longer think that just a long bike ride is this major thing so the rubber leg isn't as noticeable

                          Based on the size of the two enormous "water bottles" on my new bike ^^ above^^ I fear I may be to drunk to run after I get off.

                           

                          I do find the idea of Trent doing a BRICK workout entertaining though...

                          L.Chang


                            It's cool that you got into biking, although it sounds like it was really hot for a ride. For me personally, I go more for building a cadence than some intense speed. The cadence is important, especially if you have some hills or a headwind. I do recommend that you check your cranks to make sure they fit the length of your legs; otherwise, you'll be working harder than you need to which can in part be the cause of leg soreness (well, aside from using the muscles : ) ).  And when you can, just find an empty bike trail and go for an early morning ride--it's the best!

                              Does this mean Trent is going to have major calves AND quads?? I think we will need before and after photos.

                              Live the Adventure. Enjoy the Journey. Be Kind. Have Faith!