Cycling harassment (Read 755 times)

    http://www.dailycamera.com/boulder-county-news/ci_23604247/boulder-triathlete-injured-possible-road-rage-incident-north?source=most_viewed

     

    No! Not you too Boulder. You were supposed to be the exercising safe haven. At least they got the license plate, though I don't know what's taking so long to press charges/ticket the driver.

     

    For a car in such a rush it's amazing that they still had time to pull a full stop on a hill just to hurt somebody. Angry

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      http://www.dailycamera.com/boulder-county-news/ci_23604247/boulder-triathlete-injured-possible-road-rage-incident-north?source=most_viewed

       

      The comments following the article show the disturbing mentality of many drivers, and their ignorance as to the handling characteristics of road bikes.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       


      A Saucy Wench

         

        No! Not you too Boulder. You were supposed to be the exercising safe haven. At least they got the license plate, though I don't know what's taking so long to press charges/ticket the driver.

         

        For a car in such a rush it's amazing that they still had time to pull a full stop on a hill just to hurt somebody. Angry

         

        I doubt they will press charges.   Drivers almost always get the benefit of the doubt, even with witnesses.  Even with more blatant law breaking, and unless there is a specific road rage/ cycling harassment law, you'll be hard pressed to find a law the driver broke.  Sudden stopping is hard to ticket.

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        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


        jules2

          I'd forgotten about this one,

           

           

          http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/bike-blog/2013/may/21/twitter-hit-and-run-boast-road-tax

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          Feeling the growl again

             

            I doubt they will press charges.   Drivers almost always get the benefit of the doubt, even with witnesses.  Even with more blatant law breaking, and unless there is a specific road rage/ cycling harassment law, you'll be hard pressed to find a law the driver broke.  Sudden stopping is hard to ticket.

             

            Finding the broken law is not hard; brake checking may be called other things (impeding traffic flow, wreck less driving in some cases) but it is certainly illegal especially if done to cause an accident/injury.  But you are right, it is hard to ticket.  Especially when a bike is involved, as police, like a large percentage of the non-cycling public, tend to think that cyclists are asking for it or somehow deserving.

            "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

             

            ShuffleFaster


               

              I doubt they will press charges.   Drivers almost always get the benefit of the doubt, even with witnesses.  Even with more blatant law breaking, and unless there is a specific road rage/ cycling harassment law, you'll be hard pressed to find a law the driver broke.  Sudden stopping is hard to ticket.

               

              The sad part is, even if they press charges and convict the driver, the injured cyclist/runner almost always loses the most in the end.   (I've yet to see an athlete "win" versus car in a collision, so I tend to stay out of the way even when I have the right of way).

              ShuffleFaster


                 

                Finding the broken law is not hard; brake checking may be called other things (impeding traffic flow, wreck less driving in some cases) but it is certainly illegal especially if done to cause an accident/injury.  But you are right, it is hard to ticket.  Especially when a bike is involved, as police, like a large percentage of the non-cycling public, tend to think that cyclists are asking for it or somehow deserving.

                 

                I agree.

                 

                However, we have some self-proclaimed cycling "gangs" here in the city that run their large pelotons through some pretty busy streets, stopping traffic as they roll through, regardless of the signals. They certainly are not winning any fans with this behavior amongst the driving public.

                 

                Apparently, our city is not alone:  http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/06/28/3476153/thousands-of-bicyclists-hold-up.html

                 

                and here's a nice story: (interesting that in SF this was apparently not an isolated instance in 2012)

                 

                http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/06/21/12330744-cyclist-accused-of-vehicular-manslaughter-over-pedestrians-death-pleads-not-guilty?lite

                 

                http://articles.latimes.com/2013/mar/09/local/la-me-bicyclist-charged-20130310

                 

                These are undoubtedly exceptions to the rule with a few clowns ruining it for the responsible, but it's not surprising that the non-cycling public has a certain perception of cyclists when enough of these stories get around.

                 

                To me, the bottom line is that we all share the streets and all need to think of others instead of just ourselves.


                Feeling the growl again

                   

                  I agree.

                   

                  However, we have some self-proclaimed cycling "gangs" here in the city that run their large pelotons through some pretty busy streets, stopping traffic as they roll through, regardless of the signals. They certainly are not winning any fans with this behavior amongst the driving public.

                   

                  Apparently, our city is not alone:  http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/06/28/3476153/thousands-of-bicyclists-hold-up.html

                   

                  and here's a nice story: (interesting that in SF this was apparently not an isolated instance in 2012)

                   

                  http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/06/21/12330744-cyclist-accused-of-vehicular-manslaughter-over-pedestrians-death-pleads-not-guilty?lite

                   

                  These are undoubtedly exceptions to the rule with a few clowns ruining it for the responsible, but it's not surprising that the non-cycling public has a certain perception of cyclists when enough of these stories get around.

                   

                  To me, the bottom line is that we all share the streets and all need to think of others instead of just ourselves.

                  Every group has bad apples.  I can't think of a circumstance where this makes it in any way okay to take dangerous action against someone.  I have seen such poor cyclists but I don't brake check them or run them off the road.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                  ShuffleFaster


                    Every group has bad apples.  I can't think of a circumstance where this makes it in any way okay to take dangerous action against someone.  I have seen such poor cyclists but I don't brake check them or run them off the road.

                     

                    Agreed.


                    Needs more cowbell!

                       

                      Finding the broken law is not hard; brake checking may be called other things (impeding traffic flow, wreck less driving in some cases) but it is certainly illegal especially if done to cause an accident/injury.  But you are right, it is hard to ticket.  Especially when a bike is involved, as police, like a large percentage of the non-cycling public, tend to think that cyclists are asking for it or somehow deserving.

                       

                      +1.  My own dad has said things that make me livid...things that encourage the sort of behavior from drivers that could get his child, son-in-law, and grandson killed.  In one breath he supports US cycling and the charity fundraising riding we do, but in the next breath he will say stupid shit like "all cyclists should ride against traffic" (which is completely illegal and dangerous) and refer to anyone on a bike as a "fucking bicyclist" in front of his grandkids.  I've hung up the phone on him over this shit more than once.

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                        As I mentioned in a previous post, I've never been harassed while cycling, and I'm very surprised by what I'm reading regarding people's opinions of cyclists.  I've never witnessed it or heard of it locally.

                         

                        I ride solo every ride.  I don't ride with a group, and I must stop when I must stop at an intersection.  I don't have the 'luxury' or rolling through a stop sign because the other 24+ bikers are rolling through; I'm on my own, and must ride like I drive.

                         

                        I communicate with the cars.  I use hand signals at every opportunity.  I acknowledge a car when I hear them behind me and let them know that I'm aware that they may pass.  I make eye contact and then nod with every driver that's looking to turn left or right onto the road I'm riding on.  I make left hand turn, right hand turn, and slowing down hand signals whenever I'm changing my course of direction.  I ride defensively, and not offensively.

                         

                        Our town (and the neighboring town) are notorious for being tough on drivers and bikers.  Bikers get tickets for rolling through a stop sign.  The town requires permits for group rides in excess of 10 riders.  The biking community has blossomed over the past 10 years here, and the entire community has accepted this biking sub-community.  That's the road side.

                         

                        From the trail side, we occasionally have the opportunity to see GWB and his entourage ride.  I seldom ride or run the trails, but I did have the opportunity to see him last summer when riding.

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                        Girl Parts

                          Are you trying to make the point that if those of us were harassed were more courteous on our bikes, that we wouldn't be harassed?   Or something else?  Because I can tell you there is no correlation between how I ride and how I am treated.    I am a pretty laid back, follow the rules, communicate with drivers, yada yada kind of rider - hasn't stopped that one person from being an a-hole in a car.

                           

                          95% of drivers are fine - it's certainly not the majority.  But 5% is still plenty of harassment.

                           

                            No, I'm not trying to say that.  I'm just saying that I'm surprised by the opinions of drivers and the feeling of being harassed while riding.

                            I do think that there are experience items that'll help a rider be safer, and in turn, a driver recognize a safer rider.  But, I'm not casting judgement on "you" (who was harassed) as being inexperienced or not courteous.

                             

                            As mentioned elsewhere, there are regions of the country and locations within a metroplex that are worse (or better) than other locations.

                            I'm just surprised by the amount of people who are harassed while riding.

                             

                            Are you trying to make the point that if those of us were harassed were more courteous on our bikes, that we wouldn't be harassed?   Or something else?  Because I can tell you there is no correlation between how I ride and how I am treated.    I am a pretty laid back, follow the rules, communicate with drivers, yada yada kind of rider - hasn't stopped that one person from being an a-hole in a car.

                             

                            95% of drivers are fine - it's certainly not the majority.  But 5% is still plenty of harassment.

                            2014 Goals:

                            #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                            #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                             

                              Are you trying to make the point that if those of us were harassed were more courteous on our bikes, that we wouldn't be harassed?  

                               

                              Wow, I have a great deal that could be said re: this entire thread.

                               

                              Oski, I think there is a preception that the majority of cyclist seen on what appears to be a high end road bike clad in spandex are some kind of renegade righteuos a-hole who can't obey the rules of the road. Two or more together just makes it worse. I think if these cyclist were observed following the rules more often it would'nt be as bad.

                               

                              I'm not saying that this is the way it is...just perception.

                               

                              I'll log close to 8000 miles this year. Thankfully I don't see much if any of the harrasment listed in previous post.

                               

                              I'm very active with our States advocacy group and somewhat with the American League of cyclists. We work very hard in promoting the sharing of roads, awarness and cycling rights. We have a pretty good idea of how cyclist are viewed by the general driving public and thankfully the percentage that we would call combantant is extremely small. On the other hand, the percentage of cyclist that we would list as combatant is higher than we like to admit.

                               

                              Many states are working on a 3 foot passing law. This would certainly help with some of the harrasment issues. I also think that we cyclist ourselves could impact the way we are treated if we would obey the laws more closely ourselves and drop the attitude of "It's my right" and be more aware that drivers are impatient...let them get around you easily. (When it is prudent and safe to do so)

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