12345

Vo2max (Read 2780 times)

    So we are told that VO2MAX is not the only important variable that is important in running. It is possible for sombody to be a good runner with out having a particularly great VO2max. What I would like to know however... what sport is most dependent on VO2max? Would Cycling be high on that list? I don't see there being a huge difference in efficiency between various cyclists on the same equipment. What about rowing? Also is there any research on this specific question?
    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

      Define good runner. Elite runners are all over the board, but generally all above a certain point. I don't think there is one. Cross country skiing perhaps.
      otodawD


        My understanding of VO2max is that it is a measure of your aerobic engine. Your ability to translate energy into speed with your muscles. I had mine measured and found the best thing I could do was lose alittle weight. The lab I went to said the elites have mid 80s numbers (Lance Armstrong, Steve Prefontaine, etc) and it was a genetic gift. Then they pointed out that a guy named Frank Shorter had a number 72, that was high but not that high and he made up for it by work. As far as what sport is more dependent? I don't know since all are really aerobic activities. You can bet there is plenty of research on this.
          Vo2 max, again, is just an indicator but it isn't the final determining factor, example, you could have someone with a high V02 and he might wear high tops and do 100 yard dashes, he wouldn't do very well in a marathon or even a 1/2 probably. I would say for a long distance race, running mechanics and proper diet are more important than Vo2 max, but all within the context of a group who is at least over 60 for example. I use my RS200sd built in VO2 max indicator to measure mine and its fairly accurate which indicates to me at least that the Daniels book is approximately correct.
          a_brow89


            From what I understand, Vo2 max is pretty much the efficiency with which your body uses the oxygen you intake. It can be improved a bit with training but there is definitely a limit that you are born with. Its not the only factor in running, as other obvious things, such as long runs, doing speed work, and improving your lactate threshold all make you better. But a good Vo2 max is a very good thing. I think the highest ever recorded Vo2 max was a cross country skier. Cyclists are up there too.


            ...smile :)

              Here are some numbers: http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-238-244--12408-0,00.html It appears that Bjorn Dahlie, a Norwegian skier, has the highest ever measured Vo2 max, 94.
                ice hockey players tend to have very high VO2 max levels
                Rich_


                  So we are told that VO2MAX is not the only important variable that is important in running. It is possible for sombody to be a good runner with out having a particularly great VO2max.
                  The thinking on VO2max in the Exercise Physiology community has changed in recent years, mostly due to researcher Dr. Tim Noakes. He revisited the premise of VO2max and discovered that only a small % of runners actually reach a true VO2max during a VO2max test. In other words, most of the athletes tested reached exhaustion prior to ever reaching VO2max - i.e. something other than limited oxygen consumption was limiting their running performance. Further, Noakes found that the single best physiological predictor of running performance was how fast the athlete was running when they reached exhaustion during the test. Those who were running the fastest at the end of the VO2max text were the fastest runners in a race. The correlation was about 98%, as I recall. The interpretation of these 2 findings is that better runners have muscle fibers that can propel them at faster speeds for longer periods of time than the average guy. For example, the average runner can run at world record 5K pace; he just can't run at that pace for very long. Elites can hold that same pace for a much longer period of time. Running faster longer requires more energy than slower running, so the guy who is running faster is consuming more oxygen in order to produce that energy. In short, the speed at which you run determines how much oxygen you consume, not the other way around.
                  What I would like to know however... what sport is most dependent on VO2max?
                  In accordance with the point about muscle activation driving oxygen consumption, the sport which actively uses the most muscle mass is the one where oxygen consumption will be the highest
                  Rich World's Fastest Slow Runner


                  Cat in a Pot

                    Interesting stuff. I'm still learning about all this and, coincidentally, just did a body comp and aerobic fitness test at our local university. My VO ended up being 42.2, which has changed my HR range (I was running at too low of a range). I ran at a 10:00 pace for 8:48 before calling it quits. Don't know the percentage of the incline at the end. For a 42 yo female who just took up running 2 1/2 years ago, I'm pretty pleased with that. I plan to go back in about 6 mos to see how things change.

                    Leslie
                    Living and Running Behind the Redwood Curtain
                    -------------

                    2014: May - MDW 70-Miles (w/Trail Factor 50k) - Cascade Crest, WA/Astoria, OR/Portland, OR

                    June 7 - Grasshopper Peak Redwoods Run 30k - Humboldt Redwoods State Park, CA

                    July 12 - Mt. Hood 50 - Mt. Hood, OR

                    Oct 11 - Firetrails 50 - Lake Chabot, CA


                    "The farther you go outside, the farther you go inside." (Unknown)
                    Ultrarunnerpodcast

                    Trail Runner Nation

                    Fatozzig's Place


                    Feeling the growl again

                      nordic skiiers have a bit of an unfair advantage in VO2max tests as they are measured roller-skiing on a wide, special treadmill. In other words, they are getting full use of many more muscles than either a runner or cyclist. Since VO2max is a measure of max oxygen consumption, someone using more muscles is going to be able to drive that number higher than, for example, someone only using their legs.

                      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                       


                      I've got a fever...

                        VO2max is irrelevant. The training that you do to improve VO2max is relevant, not because it raises your VO2max, but because it makes you faster.

                        On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                          VO2max is irrelevant.
                          Irrelevant? Really? Or do you mean... "less important than other things"? Seriously?


                          I've got a fever...

                            Irrelevant? Really? Or do you mean... "less important than other things"? Seriously?
                            Seriously. I don't care what my VO2max is. Knowing it does nothing for me. Now, doing "VO2max training" (i.e. hard intervals up to about 5 minute duration) in the latter part of a training cycle will raise my VO2max. But more importantly, it will make me faster. The number on the stopwatch at the end of the race matters. Maybe I'm arguing semantics. I'm not saying I don't believe in VO2max or VO2max -- quite the opposite. Same with lactate threshold. I believe in the kind of training that improves those numbers. I just don't care about the numbers. I don't need to know what my VO2max is. Or what my LT is, for that matter. I just need to know that workouts targeted for those systems are valuable, if done intelligently. But I think for most runners, actually getting VO2max or LT tested is a waste of time and money.

                            On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                              I'm so proud right now. (I think I just got something in my eye.)

                              Runners run.

                              12345