Lance Armstrong appears finally to have run out of rope. (Read 2696 times)

     I'm glad I ride Cannondale's and not that Wisconsin companies bike.
    Now, if Chrissy Wellington were in the bad press news, I might switch over to Schwinn.  I'm pretty sure there aren't many Schwinn riders doping.

    Until then....

     

    Dude, I think Chrissy would win on a Huffy. Looks like Sagan would too.

     

    MTA: spelling

    xor


      Don't worry about Sagan.

       

      He will have billions and billions of offers.

       

      MTA: me too

       

        Who's Sagan?

        Peter...

        Carl...

        Google needs to help me with both of these recent posts.

         

        Oh, Peter rides a Cannondale, and is a racer in the Tour de France.  He may actually be winning, but who cares. 

        MTA: Oh #2, he's the Forrest Gump dude as he crosses the line!  Yes, I know him.

        Oh, Carl wrote a book called "Billions and Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium".  He's a geeky scientist dude.

         

        I didn't know either of them.

        2014 Goals:

        #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

        #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

         

        xor


          Yes, I was making a Carl Sagan joke based off the idea that there's a TdF rider named "Sagan" (Peter Sagan, of course).

           

          Uncle Carl was famous for saying "billions and billions" with a certain emphasis.  For awhile, in the 80s, this phrase came up a lot.  Like "Where's the Beef?"

           

          (except that he probably never really said it.  Johnny Carson did.  He did entitle his last book Billions and Billions though)

           

          Ok. Back to cycling.  And steroids.  And whatnot.

           

            Speaking of Sagan.

             

            Here's his Cannondale with a creepy Tourminator paint job. 

             

            Note the bell he uses to politely alert runners and rollerbladers on multi use paths.

             

             

            Now here's what he does when he passes you.

             

              Yes, I was making a Carl Sagan joke based off the idea that there's a TdF rider named "Sagan" (Peter Sagan, of course).

               

              Uncle Carl was famous for saying "billions and billions" with a certain emphasis.

               

              (except that he probably never really said it.  Johnny Carson did.  He did entitle his last book Billions and Billions though)

               

              Sorry, my friend.  I'm not smart enough to understand jokes about astronomers.  Bring it down a notch for me, please.

              2014 Goals:

              #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

              #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

               

                 

                Note the bell he uses to politely alert runners and rollerbladers on multi use paths.

                That's funny! 

                I'm glad you pointed that out.

                2014 Goals:

                #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                 

                  He agreed to participate in a sport where doping is against the rules.  Say he did dope.  Now we're supposed to feel it's unfair that they use every legal means to nail him?

                   

                  C'mon.

                   

                  Cheaters, by definition, flaunt the rules.  There is nothing "unfair" about doing everything legally possible to turn the tables on them.  You seem a lot more concerned about defending your favorite cyclist than defending the sport.  THAT is not a good precedent to set.

                   

                  Saying that the USADA is acting legally puts the cart before the horse.  That's exactly my point, although you keep trying to make it personal.  I am concerned about defending the process (fundamental fairness in due process terms) and allocating limited resources to more meaningful and forward-looking pursuits.   I can't defend cycling during that time period.  Nobody can -- which is part of my point.  Who was clean?  Enough already.  Take the money and spend it on improved testing, conducting additional tests, educational programs.  The Hope Solo things shows that the USADA is active, but it could be more active and focused.      

                   

                  The irony is that Tygart's pursuit of the Great White Whale could just as likely to undermine the USADA's integrity and the process on which it relies.  How happy will USADA be if a federal court rules that its procedures need to be rewritten?  It's not an unreasonable prospect.  It's a colossal frolic and detour. 

                    I will also volunteer that I found the answer to my question.  The CAS sanctioned Tim Montgomery based almost entirely on the testimony of someone who said that Montgomery admitted using BALCO candy.  No positive tests (although 5 that were "abnormal").  So, there's that.

                      sometimes when you have no logical defense your best bet is to attack the governing body for a rules violation. 

                       

                      http://www.thepostgame.com/blog/dish/201207/broncos-linebacker-failed-two-drug-tests-providing-non-human-urine

                       

                      but it's not like Tygart hasn't seen this before...

                       

                      http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/7608360/ryan-braun-wins-appeal-50-game-suspension

                      In an infinite universe, the one thing sentient life cannot afford to have is a sense of proportion

                      http://htwins.net/scale2/scale2.swf?bordercolor=white&fb_source=message

                       

                       

                       

                        I think "Bradley Wiggins" is pretty much the perfect name for a British bike racer, especially when his name is spoken by Phil Ligget and Paul Sherman. I may have a small man crush on him.  And I really, really hope he's clean:

                         

                        http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog/2012/jul/13/bradley-wiggins-dope-drugs?newsfeed=true

                         

                        That is not something I wish to live with. Doping would simply be not worth it. This is only sport we are talking about. Sport does not mean more to me than all those other things I have. Winning the Tour de France at any cost is not worth the possibility of losing all that.


                        I am not willing to risk all those things I've got in my life. I do it because I love it. I don't do it for a power trip: at the end of the day, I'm a shy bloke looking forward to taking my son to summer rugby camp after the Tour, where he could maybe bump into his hero, Sam Tomkins. That's what's keeping me going here. What I love is doing my best and working hard. If I felt I had to take drugs, I would rather stop tomorrow, go and ride club 10-mile time trials, ride to the cafe on Sundays, and work in Tesco stacking shelves.

                         

                        Runners run.

                          Saying that the USADA is acting legally puts the cart before the horse.  That's exactly my point, although you keep trying to make it personal.  I am concerned about defending the process (fundamental fairness in due process terms) ...

                          Suppose Rider X gets pulled over for DUI in Mayberry NC.  His car is impounded, and the official inventory shows the trunk to be overflowing with vials of EPO/HGH/steroids/what-have-you, bags of chilled blood, boxes of syringes, and stacks of ledgers detailing athletes, injection dates and amounts.  All are checked in and held by the Mayberry Police.  Rider X states that it's his hooch and confirms what the drugs are.  The story goes viral, and USADA hears of it.

                           

                          You're saying USADA can't ask Barney Fife for a copy of that impound form?  Or a copy of the police report with Rider X's statements?  Or that the statement (by Rider X during a police interview) of the drugs and stuff being in Rider X's car is unavailable to be used by them in a doping prosecution?  Because it's information gotten through channels other those USADA themselves can exercise?

                          “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

                            I think "Bradley Wiggins" is pretty much the perfect name for a British bike racer, especially when his name is spoken by Phil Ligget and Paul Sherman. I may have a small man crush on him.  And I really, really hope he's clean:

                             

                            http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog/2012/jul/13/bradley-wiggins-dope-drugs?newsfeed=true

                             

                            That is not something I wish to live with. Doping would simply be not worth it. This is only sport we are talking about. Sport does not mean more to me than all those other things I have. Winning the Tour de France at any cost is not worth the possibility of losing all that.


                            I am not willing to risk all those things I've got in my life. I do it because I love it. I don't do it for a power trip: at the end of the day, I'm a shy bloke looking forward to taking my son to summer rugby camp after the Tour, where he could maybe bump into his hero, Sam Tomkins. That's what's keeping me going here. What I love is doing my best and working hard. If I felt I had to take drugs, I would rather stop tomorrow, go and ride club 10-mile time trials, ride to the cafe on Sundays, and work in Tesco stacking shelves.

                            If he is telling the truth (no reason to believe he's not), the consequences are pretty big for the sport.  The assumption is that doping is almost par for the course and that doping is needed to bring you base line.  If he's clean that's a huge challenge to the assumption. So, I also hope he's clean, but as much for the sport as for him in particular.  

                            "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                              If he is telling the truth (no reason to believe he's not), the consequences are pretty big for the sport.  The assumption is that doping is almost par for the course and that doping is needed to bring you base line.  If he's clean that's a huge challenge to the assumption. So, I also hope he's clean, but as much for the sport as for him in particular.  

                               

                              Same goes for Ryder Hesjedal winning the Giro this year.

                               

                              BTW, I believe the Brit (Millar) who took today's stage won clean. Here he is totally wasted from the effort.

                               

                                BTW, I believe the Brit (Millar) who took today's stage won clean. Here he is totally wasted from the effort.

                                 

                                Where's his lower body?!

                                “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman