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Running in "minimalist" shoes (Read 511 times)

     

    Yes.

     

    Maybe I should have said "should".

    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

      Interesting.  Just saw this today.

       

      http://www.runnersworld.com/barefoot-running-minimalism/study-vibram-fivefingers-lead-greater-risk-foot-bone-injury

       

      I can't vote in the poll.  I run primarily in minimalist shoes but only started running a couple years ago so no options available to me.

       

      I'm doing most of my running in skechers go runs right now although I have a pair of vibrams.

      Why do Vibrams always seem to get singled out by these things, wouldn't this apply to all fully minimalist shoes?

        As a kid I did track and cross country in what could be called 'minimalist' shoes, but really I just liked the lighter weight.  I've always been the type to run in the yard barefoot so that may explain it.   
        When I started doing longer distances in my mid-teens, I thought I needed more cushion so I went to some slightly heavier, but still neutral shoes (Saucony Progrid Ride).  After a few years I said screw it and went back to 'minimalist' shoes, and currently love the Kinvaras (although it'd be nice if they'd last longer...).  Never read any books, just went with what felt right.

        'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

         

        "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

         

        "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

        Sharz96


          I still run in fully cushioned shoes, still in 8-12mm heel-to-toe drop.  I've gone moderate stability to mild stability, but otherwise the same.

             

            Interesting, since I started running barefoot I have broken all of my previous shod records and not only win AG awards, but also have placed in the top 10, though usually I only place in the top 20.

             

            I am at least a minute per mile slower barefoot and about 30 seconds per mile slower in the VFFs.  Plus with snow about five months out of the year, I don't run BF or in the VFFs as much as I would like.

            NHLA


              I run in nb minimalist & merril barefoot. Got one pair of wave riders that I run in once a week.

              minimalist shoes stopped my PF!

              I dd run slower in them at first but picked up speed after 3 mo.


              Feeling the growl again

                Why do Vibrams always seem to get singled out by these things, wouldn't this apply to all fully minimalist shoes?

                 

                A)  The study was in a VERY small number of people.

                 

                B)  Vibrams represent a large share of the minimalist market.  Not sure why other similar shoes would be any different.

                 

                I'm not sure this study....even if you want to accept anything from such a small study...says anything other than make sure you use a slow transition.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 

                  I run in the same basic shoe as I did 5 yr ago - trail. However, over the last 10 yrs, I've gone from mc with 3/4 length rigid orthotics to stability to "neutral" that have some support and haven't used orthotics for over 2 yr. I've had problems finding shoes with wide forefeet and decent forefoot protection over the past few years with no real favorite until I got some Saucony Xodus 3 in the fall, which feels like a winner. It's 4-mm drop but they added a bunch of protection for forefeet and a wide forefoot. Adrenaline ASRs that I got about the same time are lighter, but more pronation control, more drop, and less forefoot protection. (I've had a lot of problems on gravel roads with pointy gravel.)

                   

                  Not sure what "minimalist" really means, esp. when Hoka considers themselves minimalist because of their 4-mm drop. Is it lighter, lower heel-to-toe drop, no rock plate, less pronation control even if the shoe is built sturdier hence providing more support?

                   

                  Not sure about nomenclature as long as it works for me.

                  "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
                  Phenix


                    Count me as one who stress fractured her 2nd metatarsal after running in Vibrams and New Balance Minimus for a year. I can't be sure it wouldn't have happened otherwise in "normal" shoes, but 10 weeks off running scared me into a more traditional shoe. I currently circulate Kinvaras, Newtons, and I reserve Saucony Progrid Rides (8mm heel-toe drop, more cushion) for long runs.


                    Right on Hereford...

                       

                      A)  The study was in a VERY small number of people.

                       

                      B)  Vibrams represent a large share of the minimalist market.  Not sure why other similar shoes would be any different.

                       

                      I'm not sure this study....even if you want to accept anything from such a small study...says anything other than make sure you use a slow transition.

                       

                      Small studies can be scientifically valid if designed and conducted well. Are you a peer of the authors, and thus in a position to critique the methodology?

                       

                      But yes, the authors themselves formed the same conclusion (use an even slower transition than has been recommended).

                       

                      On another note, I found it interesting that a) the last person I saw running in Vibrams (2 days ago) appeared to be landing pretty heavily on her heels, and b) the heel was the location of one of the two stress fractures noted in the study. I think a lot of people do, in fact, heel strike when running in minimal shoes, and it seems logical that this would contribute to injury.

                      NorCal


                        I ran in Cumulus and then Ghost for several years. I switched to 4mm heel-toe shoes (Kinvaras and Mirages) last year. I plan on getting the Virratas soon too, which are 0mm. I also have VFFs and NB00TR but I don't run in those, just hike/walk.

                        Humboldt Redwoods Half Marathon 10.20.2013 

                        Tiburon by the Bay Half Marathon 11.3.2013 (My Birthday!) 

                        Napa Valley Full Marathon 3.2.2013

                         

                        PRs: 

                        Half: 1:48

                        Full: 4:34

                         


                        Hungry

                           

                          A)  The study was in a VERY small number of people.

                           

                          B)  Vibrams represent a large share of the minimalist market.  Not sure why other similar shoes would be any different.

                           

                          I'm not sure this study....even if you want to accept anything from such a small study...says anything other than make sure you use a slow transition.

                          I agree with the slow transition. I think this is where people may need more specific guidance. 10 weeks might sound like a very slow transition to some people. For me, I took about a year to fully transition to my Vibrams. I was trying to "undo" 40+ years of heel-striking in shoes with an elevated, cushioned heel. Initially, I walk/jogged maybe only once or twice a week in the Vibrams, and maybe only a mile or two. I would do most  miles in my "traditional" shoes, and then gradually increase the mix of my runs in the Vibrams until it was a little more than 50% of my total miles. But during that transition, I tried to do all that other stuff that's supposed to go along with barefoot running -- landing more toward the forefoot, shortening the stride, quickening the cadence (~175/min) , etc. I also don't carry a lot of extra weight, so I think that helped make the transition. I think it takes a lot of practice and patience to make such a big change, but I think I was willing to be patient because I totally bought into the basic premise of Born to Run -- that the human foot evolved over centuries into the perfect running shoe. I'm not sure I did everything right along the way, but I've now been able to avoid the injuries I used to get that caused me to stop running a number of years ago. I'm running farther and faster now (in my late 40's) than I did in my late 20's, and I enjoy it a whole lot more. The Vibrams have since been retired, but everything I use now is 0 - 4 mm offset, very light, very flexible.

                          I have seen a lot of people heel strike in their Vibrams and I cringe.

                            FWIW

                             

                            I did my first run today in "minimalist" shoes. Nike Free's 3

                             

                            A couple of notes.

                             

                            I'm returning from a knee injury.

                            I normally run between 40 - 50 mpw.

                            I usually keep 3 - 4 shoes in rotation that range from neutral to mild stability.

                            My injury is due to a combination of overuse from a mega month in Dec and pile driving my knee into the frozen ground during a bike race.

                             

                            Notes from todays run.

                            Felt great. I can't say that I noticed anything different with my foot strike. The run was only 4.7 miles I really liked the shoe. Looking forward to a longer run in them.

                            www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building


                            MM #6177

                              Hi Slo! Smile

                              I used to wear highly cushioned traditional drop shoes, neutral but with custom orthotics (Brooks Glycerin primarily). I started playing around with my foot strike and worked on incorporating the principles of Chi Running, and the next thing I knew, I couldn't wear my orthotics anymore. So now I run in the Brooks Pure Flow almost exclusively (4mm drop, neutral fit, minimal cushioning). I keep looking for alternate brands and models to try as a complement to the Flows, but haven't found anything my feet really feel at home in. I have a pair of Saucony Kinvara 3's with just over 100 miles on them which I really tried to like.... nope, too mushy on the sides of the shoe. And I recently tried the Nike Free 3, didn't like how that one felt either. I have 5-6 pairs of the Flows in my active rotation, a couple of which are on the verge of retiring (300+ miles), and 4 more pairs on deck when these are all done. This is the first model of the shoe that is now discontinued; I had tried the Pure Flow 2 and hated it, hence the stocking up of all these pairs.

                               

                              Thinking about trying the Altras again... hmm....


                              Right on Hereford...

                                 

                                Not sure what "minimalist" really means, esp. when Hoka considers themselves minimalist because of their 4-mm drop. Is it lighter, lower heel-to-toe drop, no rock plate, less pronation control ...?

                                 

                                Yes to all of the above. And add to the list: less cushioning, more flexible, room for the toes to spread out and flex.

                                 

                                All of these characteristics put a shoe closer to the "minimal" end of the scale. But, it's a scale, with bare feet on one end and maybe the Brooks Beast or combat boots on the other.

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