12

running my first 10k race (Read 159 times)

    Going to be running my first 10k race in a couple weeks.

     

    I haven't run that far yet in my training.  I run 5.4 miles once a week, around 65 minutes at about 80% effort .  Most my other runs are around 3 miles, about 3 or 4 times a week.  My 5k time is just under 27 minutes, at 99.9% effort.

     

    Not sure how I want to run this 10k.  Not sure if I want to endure the discomfort of race pace and end of race fatigue for such a long race, relatative to the 5k distance.  Maybe I just want to run a relaxed pace the whole way, not pushing it until the last 100 yards.

     

    I'm in no real hurry for a training run over my usual 5.4 miles before the race.  If the weekend before the race has nice weather, and if I have the time, I might try 7 miles just for the heck of it.  Just to know I can do it.  Then just do easy 3 mile runs the rest of that week, taking the day before the race off.

     

    On the other hand, it would be nice to go under 60 minutes, but to do that I'll have to race hard and endure some discomfort, pushing my tired legs, using all my wind, and basically giving it my all.  I just haven't mentally accepted the 10k distance like that yet!


    Just a dude.

      Advice from a random Internet guy:

       

      Maybe race your 10k like this:

       

      Start with the effort that feels like your 80% 5.4 mile run. With the excitement and everything, you will be running faster. That's ok, as long as it really feels like 80%.

       

      Monitor your body. Keep a bit of reserve in the tank as you go along.

       

      With a mile or so to go, see if you feel confident enough in how you feel to pick it up some. Try to reel in another runner or two. Nothing drastic, just lean into it. As you get close to the finish, you'll probably be able to gauge available reserves better and run accordingly.

       

      There's not a lot of difference between 5.4 and 6.2. People do marathons and half marathons all the time without running that far in practice. It would be better if you did, but it won't kill you...

       

      Good luck! Let us know how it goes...

       

      -Kelly

      Getting back in shape... Just need it to be a skinnier shape... 

        Sounds like a good plan.  Thanks!

            In any race shorter than a marathon I think it is good to prepare by running distances further than the race distance, you don't have to do it at a fast pace, take it slow and easy just to work on going the longer distance, it will build confidence and endurance for the 10k. I would suggest you try to get in two runs of the 7 mile distance  in the weeks up to the race, otherwise your plan seems good. See how you feel during the race itself. When you run with other racers you might find yourself wanting to keep pace with those around you and do better than expected. Of course it is hard to keep up the pace at the end when you start to run out of steam, but if your training is good  you should be able to do it. On the other hand, you should have fun and not "kill" yourself on your first 10k. Remember that if you don't push it too hard this time it will be easier to better your time on your next 10k.

           Note that I have never run a 10k race myself, but I have done 5ks, Half Marathons and Marathons in the past, my last Marathon being over 10 years ago. My own training this past year has been put off schedule due to injury, sickness and a very cold winter. I am just starting to build up again to 5 mile runs and I would like to do a 7 miler in the next week or so, time and weather permitting. My plan this summer is to prepare for doing a half marathon in September and baring any more setbacks to then train to accomplish another marathon.

           Good luck!

            To my OFS brother, line up with the ten to eleven minute folks and hang with them for the first three or four miles, and then adjust your pace as you see fit.  You've been running pretty consistently for quite some time now, and even though you've not run this distance yet, I'm betting your body is more ready for it than your mind.  Smile

             

            Remember, go out (a little) slow, speed things up once you're into the second half of the race, and HAVE FUN!  Smile

              I ran 3 miles this morning, specifically thinking about the 10k.  Tried to pick a pace I could hold for a long time, and it turned out to be 9:20.  I think I could hold that pace for 6.2 miles.  Won't know for sure until I do it, but seemed plausible.  I could always slow it  a bit to rest if need be.  Main goal is to finish without walking.  Secondary goal is to go under 60 minutes.

               

              Mentally, with regard to running, I'm in a good place.  My weight is down to 170 lbs, with my goal being 165.  It is likely that I will drop into the 160s before the race.  Racing at 169 or 168 lbs would be a huge psychological advantage for me.  Down from my alltime high weight of 225 lbs last Summer when I started this whole health kick thing.

               

              I've also been eyeing some Summer track meets coming up.  I'd like to give the 400m a try.  Getting lighter is important for that.  My old HS track weight was 145 lbs.  Getting down to 165 lbs will bring me within 20 pounds of my true lean fit weight.  I don't have to lose those last 20 as part of my immediate goal, but they will be bonus loss pounds if I drop any through my upcoming running plans.

               

              It is Springtime, so the running is easy Smile

                I ran 3 miles this morning, specifically thinking about the 10k.  Tried to pick a pace I could hold for a long time, and it turned out to be 9:20.  I think I could hold that pace for 6.2 miles.  Won't know for sure until I do it, but seemed plausible.  I could always slow it  a bit to rest if need be.  Main goal is to finish without walking.  Secondary goal is to go under 60 minutes.

                 

                Mentally, with regard to running, I'm in a good place.  My weight is down to 170 lbs, with my goal being 165.  It is likely that I will drop into the 160s before the race.  Racing at 169 or 168 lbs would be a huge psychological advantage for me.  Down from my alltime high weight of 225 lbs last Summer when I started this whole health kick thing.

                 

                I've also been eyeing some Summer track meets coming up.  I'd like to give the 400m a try.  Getting lighter is important for that.  My old HS track weight was 145 lbs.  Getting down to 165 lbs will bring me within 20 pounds of my true lean fit weight.  I don't have to lose those last 20 as part of my immediate goal, but they will be bonus loss pounds if I drop any through my upcoming running plans.

                 

                It is Springtime, so the running is easy Smile

                 

                Great job on the weight loss thing; I'm envious.  Smile

                 

                I was at my all-time-high about a year ago, however, I'll never know what it was as I was too afraid/embarrased to get on the scale (I do know it was north of 250).  I haven't been on the scale since my physical in late January, but I doubt I'm much below the mid 190s (my January weight) as my running took a hit in March what with two trips, lots of weather related issues and a very sore hip (probably due to a fall on the ice).

                 

                Like you I raced in high school (40 years ago) in the mid 140s, however, I'll be rotting in my grave before I ever see that weight again.  By the time I got out of the Marines in 1979 I was 5 pounds either side of 170, and I was in the low 170s later that year when I ran a sub three hour marathon (my one and only).  At this point if I could get back into the 170s I'd be thrilled, that and what with the standard metric of, "racing times reduce 20 seconds per mile for every 10 pounds of weight reduction," I should be able to run a sub 20 5K.

                  I ran 3 miles this morning, specifically thinking about the 10k.  Tried to pick a pace I could hold for a long time, and it turned out to be 9:20.  I think I could hold that pace for 6.2 miles.  Won't know for sure until I do it, but seemed plausible.  I could always slow it  a bit to rest if need be.  Main goal is to finish without walking.  Secondary goal is to go under 60 minutes.

                   

                  Mentally, with regard to running, I'm in a good place.  My weight is down to 170 lbs, with my goal being 165.  It is likely that I will drop into the 160s before the race.  Racing at 169 or 168 lbs would be a huge psychological advantage for me.  Down from my alltime high weight of 225 lbs last Summer when I started this whole health kick thing.

                   

                  I've also been eyeing some Summer track meets coming up.  I'd like to give the 400m a try.  Getting lighter is important for that.  My old HS track weight was 145 lbs.  Getting down to 165 lbs will bring me within 20 pounds of my true lean fit weight.  I don't have to lose those last 20 as part of my immediate goal, but they will be bonus loss pounds if I drop any through my upcoming running plans.

                   

                  It is Springtime, so the running is easy Smile

                   

                  This sounds good.  I bet you'll do fine in the 10K.  I suggest that you keep a relaxed pace and enjoy yourself from the beginning, and see where it takes you.  The race atmosphere will likely prod you to go a bit faster than your training pace, which should be a good thing. Smile

                  Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                    "Like you I raced in high school (40 years ago) in the mid 140s, however, I'll be rotting in my grave before I ever see that weight again."

                     

                    Shipo, that's one way to lose weight!  I don't know if I'll ever hit 145 lbs, but that's why I set my goal only at 165 lbs.  After I hit that goal, it will no longer be about weight.  It will only be about running.  I'll look down to see if I still have a gut left, or if I have any flab.  If I don't, then fine, no adjustments.  But if I can see the fat, then I'll wonder why I'm carrying that along with me on my runs Smile

                      I did a training run of 6.2 miles in 1:06:and change.  Just to go that distance and see how it felt.  I was trying to go smooth, not pushing it too much, if you know what I mean.  Certainly no desperate sprint at the end.

                       

                      Also, a few days later, I did a 3 mile training run in 26:18.

                       

                      I'm feeling good in my running and am staying healthy.  I think I can run a 10k without too much worry.  If I inadvertently go out too fast, I can slow down and recoup, hang on for a while, and then push again at the end.  All the while running, because my biggest fear is to ever have to stop and walk.

                        It definitely sounds like you're well prepared for the race.  As a suggestion, you might want to line up with the 10:00 pace folks and let them pace you for the first couple of miles before you get into the clear and can run at your own pace.  Don't worry, they won't be too fast for you as most of them lie (or don't give a flyin' flip) about the pace they *think* they're going to run.  By starting out this way you'll have plenty of cannon fodder to pass, and every runner you pass will help give you the confidence to A) go a bit faster, and B) pass the next individual.

                         

                        Based upon your training run I predict you'll break an hour with relative ease.  Keep us posted on how you make out.  Smile

                          Ran the race in 56 minutes.  I was quite happy about that.

                           

                          If I lose some more weight, it will get easier.  Because that time wasn't easy at all Smile


                          Just a dude.

                            Great place to start. Good Job!

                             

                            -Kelly

                            Getting back in shape... Just need it to be a skinnier shape... 

                            bap


                              Well done!

                              Age 52

                              2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

                              GinnyinPA


                                Congratulations!  You're no longer fat or slow.

                                12