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Clip-on pedals (Read 1658 times)

    As a former avid mtn biker in the early 90's, Clipless was just becoming the norm in our group. It was always entertaining to watch the newest group member to go clipless as there were always some great falls with riders stuck in...... then as one of the last members to switch, I too had to endure the "breaking" in period of learning to get out of clipless pedals. What really helped me is to use an already broken in pair of pedals because they were so much easier to get in and out of when you're new. Luckily my husband was happy to switch his "used" pedals with my new ones. Now that I mtn bike very rarely, its a challenge for the muscle memory to kick in. I would never go back to the cages though because the connection with the bike is unbeatable for manuveruability (sp?).
    markc123


      Learned clipless on the mountain bike in the 90's. Best one was falling over next to the canal - I slowly toppled over to my left, ending up upside down, bike on top of me still clipped in. I stopped for a minuite to pedal as I thought it was quite funny to be lying on my back still attached. Of course if I had fallen to the right, I would have been upside down in the canal which is not a happy thing. I am some times amazed by how much of a reflex unclipping becomes - even high speed over the handle bar moments seem to turn out ok.
        So, does every bike shoe work with every clipless pedal? ie Is there one standard size?


        Team HTFU NCTR Driver

          So, does every bike shoe work with every clipless pedal? ie Is there one standard size?
          No, but there is some standardization. Mountain bike shoes (and "touring" shoes, which look sort of like walking shoes) are almost universally "SPD" compatible, so almost any pedal that's advertised as "SPD" or "two-bolt" compatible will work. For road shoes, it's more complicated; there are at least 4 systems that I know about. Look, or "3-bolt" is the granddaddy of them. There's a 4-bolt system (I think that might be the "Time" system), as well as SPD-R and regular old SPD, same as on mountain shoes. When you buy the pedals, they'll come with a set of cleats that you can attach to your shoes, so as long as the shoe has a bolt pattern that fits the cleat, you're good to go. did



            No, but there is some standardization. Mountain bike shoes (and "touring" shoes, which look sort of like walking shoes) are almost universally "SPD" compatible, so almost any pedal that's advertised as "SPD" or "two-bolt" compatible will work. For road shoes, it's more complicated; there are at least 4 systems that I know about. Look, or "3-bolt" is the granddaddy of them. There's a 4-bolt system (I think that might be the "Time" system), as well as SPD-R and regular old SPD, same as on mountain shoes. When you buy the pedals, they'll come with a set of cleats that you can attach to your shoes, so as long as the shoe has a bolt pattern that fits the cleat, you're good to go. did
            Thanks, did! I hope I'll be coming home with a new road bike tomorrow. (and shoes and pedals...)
              Got my bike on Saturday! Tonight was my first ride, since I've had a fever the last few days and felt like crap. The bike shop guy got the bike all set up for me, and MADE me get on the trainer and practice clipping in and out until I thought I was going insane. He said he doesn't let anybody leave with out being able to clip in and out without looking down at your feet. Pretty good idea, I thought. Smile No falls yet... yet. Big grin Wink


              Team HTFU NCTR Driver

                Sounds like that shop's a keeper. Any place that'll take the time to MAKE you learn to use something like that is a good one! did



                  Sounds like that shop's a keeper. Any place that'll take the time to MAKE you learn to use something like that is a good one! did
                  Yes. I thought so too. AND, it was a very busy Saturday. There was a constant stream of people in and out of there and only 2 people working (owner and one other guy); people weren't just looking either. I was very satisfied. Unfortunately, the shop is 2 hours away. But, I'll make the trip back down there. He was very helpful.


                  go Care Bear go!

                    Oh yes, bike riding was so much easier at age 10 and surely "ohshit, ohshit, ohshit" is the natural response as you tip over. I am still such a newbie at cycling that I can relate to all of this. I'm told (still trying to really believe it) that the whole tipping over/falling thing is a rite of passage for cyclists but it is still embarrassing and often, bloody. Frankly, I'm more pissed off that my new bike gets scratched up when I fall than the scrapes and bruises I endure. And how come I NEVER see anyone else lying on the ground attached to their bike by their feet?! When I first got my clipless pedals on, the bike shop guy also made me practice in the trainer over and over and over. So, then I get my big girl britches on and decide to take it out to the parking lot. In, out, start, stop for quite a while. Now, I think I've got and it really is time to get home, so I come in to a nice stop in front of the bike shop and unclip right. And of course lean left. I'm thinking that wasn't a great advertisement for clipless pedal sales that day. ... me splayed out on ground all bloody (oh and the lovely chain ring scar I have on my right calf is a wonderful reminder of that fateful day!). If I can survive this learning curve, anyone can.
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