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Cross Training Success Stories? (Read 414 times)

    I am currently training for a 30 km race at the end of March. I did not have a big base and I injured my Soleus about three weeks ago, tried to come back to fast and I am just now getting back on the road. Since it was Christmas break I spent lot of time elliptical training and pool running. ( 51 hours of training in December including 260 kms before I got hurt ). I am running with minor pain 7.5 kms a day and hope to take the next two weeks go get back up to 12 km a day and then the balance of January to get up to speed. I am planning on supplementing my real running with pool running and elliptical until March and then two weeks of just running.

     

    Has anyone had good success racing off a plan like this?

     

    regards

    Kevin

      Kevin:

       

      Mary Decker, one of the biggest names in the US T&F history back in 1980s, had to spend (I can't remember the exact number) 4 or 5 weeks doing the pool running because she hurt her Achilles or something.  She stepped out of the pool and that week, she ran the fastest 2000m in the world that year, went on and won 2 gold medals in Helsinki World Championships a few weeks later.

       

      That said, however, her events were 1500-3000m.  30k or a marathon would be a bit different because of pounding on the road.  In other words, you most probably wouldn't get a success story like hers on the long road races.  But given your good solid background of running and seemingly careful planning, I don't see any reason why not you can't expect good results.  Make sure you do do some longish run on the road before the race to get your legs used to poundings.  If you do do some speed training, I would recommend you do so in the pool or elliptical because getting up on your toes for speed running would most likely hurt your soleus again.  What you need is to get some higher effort exercise to stimulate your metabolism; for 30k, you wouldn't need lightening fast speed--but you do need to stimulate that metabolism in order to maximize your oxygen carrying capacity.

       

      Don't try to look at your getting back to running as "12k a day" or something like that.  Do mix some short runs and longish runs and continuing cross training to take pressure off your injured area.  It is much better to get to the starting line without any injury than completing impressive training program with sore legs.

        Hey Nobby,

        That is encouraging and is good advice that is in line with a lot of what I was thinking. I was going to start doing longer runs in February and hope to get in three runs that will be over 90 minutes before the end of March. I want to give myself 14 days between long runs. I think I might have triggered the injury with longish runs on three consecutive Saturdays.

         

        I hear what you are saying about getting onto the starting line with fresh legs instead of with an injury. My new motto is " There is no point in being the fastest person in the physiotherapists room "

         

        Kevin

          Kevin, Around the Bay by any chance?

           

          No specific advice just my own experience.  I was injured a few years ago 8 weeks away from a marathon and did a lot of elliptical including a 2 1/2 hour session 2 weeks before the race (it was supposed to be 3 hours but the boredom won!).  I then was able to resume running the last 2 weeks before the race and completed it with no problem.  Not my fastest time but not much slower than my average marathon.

           

          Good luck!

          Formerly known as coolrunning on the RW forums

            Yes, is the Around the Bay. I ran it last year on a slightly torn calf, tore it badly during the race but still managed a 2:15. I tore is so badly I could not run for seven months. I am now back on my feet and taking aim at Around the Bay again. It really is a great race, 30 km is an ideal distance, the course if good and the crowds are wonderful. I still laugh when I think of the fellow handing out bacon at 18 km. I hear you with the boredom, sometimes I fear I am a bit of a wierdo, 2 hours running, no distractions other than the great big beautiful world, no problem. One hour on the elliptical watching television, big problem.

            Kevin, Around the Bay by any chance?

             

            No specific advice just my own experience.  I was injured a few years ago 8 weeks away from a marathon and did a lot of elliptical including a 2 1/2 hour session 2 weeks before the race (it was supposed to be 3 hours but the boredom won!).  I then was able to resume running the last 2 weeks before the race and completed it with no problem.  Not my fastest time but not much slower than my average marathon.

             

            Good luck!

              You are super fast compared to me!  I finished in 3:30.  I totally missed the bacon at 18K (maybe it was all gone by the time I went by) but I did enjoy meeting the grim reaper in front of the cemetery!  You are right, it is a great race - enjoy!

               

              Yes, is the Around the Bay. I ran it last year on a slightly torn calf, tore it badly during the race but still managed a 2:15. I tore is so badly I could not run for seven months. I am now back on my feet and taking aim at Around the Bay again. It really is a great race, 30 km is an ideal distance, the course if good and the crowds are wonderful. I still laugh when I think of the fellow handing out bacon at 18 km. I hear you with the boredom, sometimes I fear I am a bit of a wierdo, 2 hours running, no distractions other than the great big beautiful world, no problem. One hour on the elliptical watching television, big problem.

              Formerly known as coolrunning on the RW forums