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The Biggest loser dangers? (Read 636 times)

Tshel106


    I am addicted to the biggest loser. My brother and I got into a discussion last night about the show and if it is unhealthy to lose weight that fast. Do you guys think it is worth the dangers of losing weight so quickly since the contestants are in so much danger from their extreme weight? For people who don't watch, most contestants lose double digits or close to it every week.


    Needs more cowbell!

      Fast weight loss in the short-term for someone who is obese/morbidly obese is no biggie--a lot of what is dropped early in the course of any strict die (say, in the first 2-3 weeks) is water weight as fat cells begin shrinking.  Once a person gets within maybe 25-50#s of ideal weight it's generally not wise to lose more than 1-2#s/week.  The faster it comes off, the less likely it is to stay off...slow and steady wins the race.

       

      For a lot of us it's damned difficult to lose even 1#/week once within 10-20#s of ideal weight.  I'm 15-20#s from where I'd like to be and I'm thrilled when I can drop a pound in a week.  Once I get 10#s out I know from past experience that .5#/week is a real victory.  When I initially lost 60#s years ago it took me ~2.5 years.  I lost 40#s in the first year.  It took me 1.5 years to lose the last 20#s while obsessively logging every molecule I put in my mouth.

      I shoot pretty things! ~

      '14 Goals:

      • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      Better I Leave


        Agreed. I'm in the same boat. About 3 years ago I lost ~50lbs over 3-4 months. I just had my body fat hydrostatically tested and I'm currently at 14.6%. I still want to lose more fat and I am...It's just "painfully" slow now.

         

        As for my thoughts/opinions on "The Biggest Loser", I'm not a fan of Jillian Michaels (much prefer Susan Powter for inspiration/motivation) and I've heard that the recidivism rate is like ~50% within the first year. I am prone to being overweight and I've managed to keep the weight off through practices conducive to a healthy lifestyle.

         

        Fast weight loss in the short-term for someone who is obese/morbidly obese is no biggie--a lot of what is dropped early in the course of any strict die (say, in the first 2-3 weeks) is water weight as fat cells begin shrinking.  Once a person gets within maybe 25-50#s of ideal weight it's generally not wise to lose more than 1-2#s/week.  The faster it comes off, the less likely it is to stay off...slow and steady wins the race.

         

        For a lot of us it's damned difficult to lose even 1#/week once within 10-20#s of ideal weight.  I'm 15-20#s from where I'd like to be and I'm thrilled when I can drop a pound in a week.  Once I get 10#s out I know from past experience that .5#/week is a real victory.  When I initially lost 60#s years ago it took me ~2.5 years.  I lost 40#s in the first year.  It took me 1.5 years to lose the last 20#s while obsessively logging every molecule I put in my mouth.

        xor


          I am addicted to the biggest loser. My brother and I got into a discussion last night about the show and if it is unhealthy to lose weight that fast. Do you guys think it is worth the dangers of losing weight so quickly since the contestants are in so much danger from their extreme weight? For people who don't watch, most contestants lose double digits or close to it every week.

           

          Biggest Loser distorts reality in a number of ways.  While it is true that contestants lose a lot of weight from show to show (and remember, they are working out a bazillion hours a day and have nutrition help), you need to understand that when they say "this week's weigh-in" they do NOT NOT always mean "...which is seven days since the last time we had this formal weigh-in process we are recording".  By "this week", they mean "the episode being aired during week x".  Sometimes it is a week between weigh-ins and sometimes it is not.  Sometimes it is longer.

           

          This is an example of why I think Biggest Loser is more danger than help... it is NOT reality.  They edit tons and tons of stuff and stitch it back together for dramatic purposes that probably didn't really go down that way.

           

          Edit: plus there was that whole real world cheating-in-a-marathon incident, and various incidents of the show setting up events that might not have been what we think they were based on the editing.  Or reporting on something that wasn't exactly that (including brother of marathon cheater who, the week prior, was said to have completed a half ironman... except it wasn't a half ironman)

           

          Julia1971


            I'm addicted, too.  I think I've watched every season except the first few.

             

            What do you mean by the danger from the weight loss?  I can see the danger from having sedentary people doing 8.0 on the treadmill their first week on the ranch - Gerry from a few seasons ago is a great example of why that's not a great idea.  But, bear in mind these contestants are monitored 24/7 by a whole team of doctors, nutritionists, and physical trainers.  For example, when Gerry collapsed and flew off the treadmill, there was medical staff there on the scene.

             

            One thing to keep in mind is that this is a t.v. show.  From what I understand from reading my favorite forum all these years, Television Without Pity, the weigh-ins aren't always once a week.  So, that first weigh-in, might actually be two weeks of weight loss.  And, subsequent "weeks" might actually be days.  And, as the season goes on, only the guys that were huge are still dropping double digits.  Most women never pull those numbers.  And, slowing weight loss is why contestants start playing games like "water loading" so they can save their weight loss for weeks it doesn't matter and then pull a big number the next week.

            The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. – Chinese Proverb

              It's not surprising the regain rate is high with BL because losing weight and exercising when at the ranch where they grocery shop for you is one thing, but it's harder when you have fit that exercise around having a job, doing your own grocery shopping, laundry and real life obligations. Yes, the runners here make time to run, but even we sometimes get caught when life gets busy.

              "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

               

              "The person who starts the race is not the same person who finishes the race."

              xor


                ...and as you read this thread, might I suggest some delicious QUAKER OAT MEAL SNACK BARS?  They come in handy serving sizes.  Nutritious and easy to eat on the go.

                 


                Needs more cowbell!

                  I've heard that the recidivism rate is like ~50% within the first year.

                   

                  The truly depressing statistic is that something like 95% of people who lose marked weight will regain most/all of weight lost within a few years--partly behavioral, but also because losing weight permanently f's with metabolism--it's a sucky catch-22.  I'm a statistic.  I eventually regained half+ of the weight I lost years ago...and much of that gain was while running and/or biking a significant amount.  It's a constant damned battle.  I've re-lost >10#s of what I gained, but I still have at least 15 to get where I want to be...mostly a vanity/athletic thing ('cause my bloodwork and BP are insanely good, as is).  I'm slower than people who train less and weigh less.  And I don't like the way I look in tight cycling attire.

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                  Tshel106


                    Hahahaha I do love the plugs for their corporate sponsers. I didn't even think about the contestants regaining all the weight.

                    Julia1971


                      ...and as you read this thread, might I suggest some delicious QUAKER OAT MEAL SNACK BARS?  They come in handy serving sizes.  Nutritious and easy to eat on the go.

                       

                      I think I'll have some Jenny-O Turkey followed by some water from my Brita water pitcher and a stick of Extra Sugar Free gum.

                      The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now. – Chinese Proverb


                      Needs more cowbell!

                        ...and as you read this thread, might I suggest some delicious QUAKER OAT MEAL SNACK BARS?  They come in handy serving sizes.  Nutritious and easy to eat on the go.

                         

                        "Nutritious."  My MIL LOVES all of those "nutritious" Quaker products (like their breakfast cookies--a dietary abomination, if ever there were one)...and has pretty awful blood work, even though she's on the light side of healthy weight.

                        I shoot pretty things! ~

                        '14 Goals:

                        • 6 duathlons (1 Olympic distance)

                        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                        xor


                          Hahahaha I do love the plugs for their corporate sponsers. I didn't even think about the contestants regaining all the weight.

                           

                          I used to poke fun at the plugs.  (personally, I think the show is unwatchable so I have to be careful what I say in this thread)

                           

                          The plugs serve as good reminders that the show is not reality.  I know everyone reading this thread gets that, or at least I hope so, but I suspect a lot of people do not.

                           

                          Better I Leave


                            I sooo know what you mean. I've been "fighting" my weight all my life. Without being diligent, I gain it back. Right there with ya my friend.

                             

                            The truly depressing statistic is that something like 95% of people who lose marked weight will regain most/all of weight lost within a few years--partly behavioral, but also because losing weight permanently f's with metabolism--it's a sucky catch-22.  I'm a statistic.  I eventually regained half+ of the weight I lost years ago...and much of that gain was while running and/or biking a significant amount.  It's a constant damned battle.  I've re-lost >10#s of what I gained, but I still have at least 15 to get where I want to be...mostly a vanity/athletic thing ('cause my bloodwork and BP are insanely good, as is).  I'm slower than people who train less and weigh less.  And I don't like the way I look in tight cycling attire.


                            sugnim

                              I've read that losing more than 1-2 pounds per week can be dangerous, but the contestants on the biggest loser show are monitored by health care staff, so I think they should probably be OK.

                               

                              Slightly off-subject: Did anyone else notice Jillian Michaels' arms are even more awesome this season than ever.  She is smokin' hot!  I'd pay to have her kick my ass through a workout.

                               

                              ETA: Of course, it's not "reality."  It's TV.  Entertainment.  However, I think it can and does inspire some viewers to take charge of their health.

                              Tshel106


                                 

                                The truly depressing statistic is that something like 95% of people who lose marked weight will regain most/all of weight lost within a few years--partly behavioral, but also because losing weight permanently f's with metabolism--it's a sucky catch-22.  I'm a statistic.  I eventually regained half+ of the weight I lost years ago...and much of that gain was while running and/or biking a significant amount.  It's a constant damned battle.  I've re-lost >10#s of what I gained, but I still have at least 15 to get where I want to be...mostly a vanity/athletic thing ('cause my bloodwork and BP are insanely good, as is).  I'm slower than people who train less and weigh less.  And I don't like the way I look in tight cycling attire.

                                 

                                How does losing weight affect your metabolism? does it make it fluctuate When you get to maintenance?

                                 

                                I don't even look at Jillian cause I can't stop looking at dolvett and bob lol....but she does look great. And I love that she has kids now!

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