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confused about shoe fit (Read 1262 times)


Joggaholic

    I've been developing callus near the ball on my right foot (on the side of the big toe) for a while. I haven't gotten a blister there for several months until my marathon last weekend, when it developed a big bloody blister. I do always put vaseline on it and wear moisture-wicking socks on every run. Other than this, I don't think I have any other problems with my current shoes. I have heard the following and am confused by them:

     

    1) Shoe is too tight, causing blister?

    2) Shoe is too loose, foot shuffles inside the shoe during run, causing blister?

     

    So which is it? The shoe felt just right to me but obvious my foot didn't agree. It will be nice to know which direction to look when I shop for my next pair. Or is this a non-issue if blistering is just an inevitable part of racing/long runs? (I don't race much at all, so I don't know)

     

    Also, assuming that there are no painful blisters, but only thickening calluses, that is ok, right? I mean the thickened skin is there to protect my foot, and so if no pain is involved, there's no need to find better fitting shoes?

      The one time I got a blister on that spot, it was because the shoes were too tight.  

      "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

      jimmyb


        Try on sizes until it feels ridiculously big, then go back a size.

        SHould be at least a good-sized man's thumb in front of your toes.

        Your feet need room to swell.

        Make sure you aren't wearing cotton socks.

        --Jimmy

        Log    PRs


        Joggaholic

          Try on sizes until it feels ridiculously big, then go back a size.

          SHould be at least a good-sized man's thumb in front of your toes.

          Your feet need room to swell.

          Make sure you aren't wearing cotton socks.

          --Jimmy

           

          Thanks. I think I'm ok with the size number since I do have a thumb's space in front of my longest toe. The callus/blister area is to the side of the foot so I'm suspecting if I need a different width (narrow or wide?), but unfortunately those widths are not usually readily available in stores to try on.

            I used to get them there, then I started buying about a full size up from where I was and now I dont get the blisters any more.  I think it has to do with the fact that my feet must swell a lot on longer runs and ended up rubbing against the side.  No issues now.

              I've been developing callus near the ball on my right foot (on the side of the big toe) for a while. I haven't gotten a blister there for several months until my marathon last weekend, when it developed a big bloody blister. I do always put vaseline on it and wear moisture-wicking socks on every run. Other than this, I don't think I have any other problems with my current shoes. I have heard the following and am confused by them:

               

              1) Shoe is too tight, causing blister?

              2) Shoe is too loose, foot shuffles inside the shoe during run, causing blister?

               

              So which is it? The shoe felt just right to me but obvious my foot didn't agree. It will be nice to know which direction to look when I shop for my next pair. Or is this a non-issue if blistering is just an inevitable part of racing/long runs? (I don't race much at all, so I don't know)

               

              Also, assuming that there are no painful blisters, but only thickening calluses, that is ok, right? I mean the thickened skin is there to protect my foot, and so if no pain is involved, there's no need to find better fitting shoes?

              To a certain extent, the shoe size has got NOTHING to do with blisters.  Blisters develop from heat.  Heat is caused by, mostly, friction.  If the shoe is too tight, then, at certain spot, the shoe literately rubs against your skin, heat develops and you get blisters.  If the shoe is too large, your foot is most likely move around too much, some spot gets rubbed around against the shoe inside, heat develops and you get blisters.  Sometimes you have too much junk on the upper of the cosmetically advanced shoes and, either from stitches or materials, you get bulky wrinkles and that would rub against your foot and you get blisters.  Sometimes the shoe fits well but from the heat developed from pounding of the run itself, you get blisters.  

               

              Having to have "a thumb width" at the end of the shoe is the OLD wife's tale.  You need SOME extra space for swelling, yes.  But thumb width?  That's A LOT!!!  Some people even go out and say "get shoes one size bigger than your size."  If that's true, the shoe manufacturers would (should) build shoes that's one size bigger for everybody.  Nonsense.  If the shoe fits well, you don't need any of these BS.  If the shape of the shoe doesn't fit your foot, THEN you'll probably need thumb width space so your foot can fit into unfitted shape of the shoe.  That used to happen back in 1960s when there were probably 2 types of shoes available in the market.  Today we have a tad more different types of shoes to choose from.  If you are smart about it and choose the shoe that actually fits your feet and not some magazine advertisement tells you, then you really don't need ANY extra space (except for the room for possible swelling).  You get shoe that's one size bigger than your foot, then the widest part of the foot doesn't fit onto the widest part of the shoe.  What often happens is then the inside of the arch, right below the big toe, gets rubbed because that's where this area fits on, and gets rubbed too much and gets blister there.  If you get blisters there, that's because you listen to this old wife's tale too much and got shoes too large.  

               

              The best way to choose "the right shoes" is to talk to your feet.  Put them on.  If possible, run a little.  Check the SHAPE of the shoe, not the size or brand or color.  

                So which is it? The shoe felt just right to me but obvious my foot didn't agree.

                 

                For me, I've observed races of 15 miles or longer tend to show subtle issues that might not have been otherwise noticed with 1000 miles of regular training, long runs and shorter races included. For the most, part going up a half size has helped.

                  For me, I've observed races of 15 miles or longer tend to show subtle issues that might not have been otherwise noticed with 1000 miles of regular training, long runs and shorter races included. For the most, part going up a half size has helped.

                   

                  Same thing here.  Having gone up 1/2 a size has helped.  But still...on long training runs of up to 15 miles and shorter tempos or short races, no problems with blistering.  But the balls of my feet and big toe still end up worse-for-the-wear during my last couple of half marathons.

                  2014 goals:   •  1st Marathon 01/17 •  1:32 Half (will have to wait, BQ'd instead)  •  2,500 miles 12/19

                  2015 goals:   •  2,500 miles  •  Get healthy  •  50 miler

                    Just to be clear, I wasn't implying that I have balls on my big toe.  That would be absurd.

                    2014 goals:   •  1st Marathon 01/17 •  1:32 Half (will have to wait, BQ'd instead)  •  2,500 miles 12/19

                    2015 goals:   •  2,500 miles  •  Get healthy  •  50 miler

                      Sometimes, balls are just metaphorical balls (Right?).

                      "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                        If the right size is 1/2 size bigger than the right size, how big is the right size?

                        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                          I get calluses in the same spot you describe. On occasion I've had a blister form there. And this has happened with different shoes so I don't attribute it to that. A little Body Glide takes care of it. More effective than Vasoline and lasts longer. Experiment with socks too. Body Glide on that spot and Thorlos socks have pretty much eliminated the blisters for me. Once it's callused, I don't really get blisters anyway. If I take some time off (which I am right now involuntarily) the risk of blister increases since the callus goes away.

                           

                            I get calluses in the same spot you describe. On occasion I've had a blister form there. And this has happened with different shoes so I don't attribute it to that. A little Body Glide takes care of it. More effective than Vasoline and lasts longer. Experiment with socks too. Body Glide on that spot and Thorlos socks have pretty much eliminated the blisters for me. Once it's callused, I don't really get blisters anyway. If I take some time off (which I am right now involuntarily) the risk of blister increases since the callus goes away.

                            Have you guys tried Engo?  Interesting stuff but it works.


                            Joggaholic

                              It sounded like there's no easy way to evaluate a shoe without actually buying and running many long runs in it. I guess experimenting with body glides and those sticky patch things will be cheaper. I just read about duct tape, I'm not inclined to try it because it seems like a big hassle before every run; but a thought occurred to me, if duct tape works, why not just duct tape the inside of the shoe instead of over the foot? (assuming there's no creasing on the tape)

                                It sounded like there's no easy way to evaluate a shoe without actually buying and running many long runs in it. I guess experimenting with body glides and those sticky patch things will be cheaper. I just read about duct tape, I'm not inclined to try it because it seems like a big hassle before every run; but a thought occurred to me, if duct tape works, why not just duct tape the inside of the shoe instead of over the foot? (assuming there's no creasing on the tape)

                                Wings:

                                 

                                Here, you got the concept all wrong.  Usually, people put duct tape (personally, I never used it) when you GOT a blister to protect the skin???  Either way, duct tape here acts as callus (as EGH explain) and acts as a toughened up skin if you haven't gotten a blister yet and if you know where you get it all the time.  But if you put the duct tape on the inside the shoes, you may actually more likely get blisters because the surface of the duct tape is sticky.  That's the whole idea (or rather opposite idea) of Engo.  It's extremely LOW friction material and you DO put it on inside the shoe where you usually get a blister.  Like I said, blister is caused by heat caused by friction (not exclusively).  If you eliminate friction, you eliminate the cause of blisters.  

                                 

                                Remember the scene from "Enter the Dragon"?  "It is like a finger pointing at the moon.  Don't concentrate on the finger or you'll miss all the heavenly glory..."  It's not so much of putting duct tape that's important.  It's what it does that's important.

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