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Some Like It Hot (Read 1272 times)


I'm back!

    I'm not sure I'd totally agree that you're going to be better in cool weather by deliberately over-heating yourself consistently.  It's a trade-off as most people can put in a lot more work and a lot harder workouts when temps are reasonable, which will offset the positive effects (higher blood volume etc) of heat acclimatization. 

    But it's also been proposed that you can get the higher blood volume of heat acclimatization by just sitting in a sauna after your workout. So in principle it seems you might be able to get the best of both worlds -- train hard in cool weather, then go sit in a sauna.

    Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners

     

    I did a bunch of sauna training for Western States -- mostly after workouts, but including some jogging in place in the sauna. Just like running Boston this year, ugh. Result? Record cool temperatures at WS. Those canyons that are normally 100+... mid 50s. Was I still helped by the sauna training? No idea.


    Doc, my tooth hurts

      I don't mind running when it's hot, I just can't imagine having all of your long sleeves sticking to you because of the sweat. Yuck

      xor


        At 10mi I look like I just got out of a pond. Sad

         

        "Yes,  I have both a pond and a pool.  The pond might be better for you..."

         

          Here's a pretty good explanation of dewpoint and relative humidity which may point to why it's sometimes more comfortable to run at night, even if the temperature of the air is warmer.

           

          Ah, yes. Thanks for that.

          It should be mathematical, but it's not.

            This morning's run:

             

            Temperature = 71

            Dew Point = 70

             

            Thanks, Debby.

            It should be mathematical, but it's not.


            Prince of Fatness

              Here's a pretty good explanation of dewpoint and relative humidity which may point to why it's sometimes more comfortable to run at night, even if the temperature of the air is warmer.

               

              Thanks for that.  I have always felt that dew point was a better indicator but the article really does a good job explaining why.  For example when I left for work this morning it was 52 out with a dew point of 47.  So even though the relative humidity was 83% it felt pretty damn nice out.

              Semi-retired.


              Feeling the growl again

                But it's also been proposed that you can get the higher blood volume of heat acclimatization by just sitting in a sauna after your workout. So in principle it seems you might be able to get the best of both worlds -- train hard in cool weather, then go sit in a sauna.

                Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners

                 

                I did a bunch of sauna training for Western States -- mostly after workouts, but including some jogging in place in the sauna. Just like running Boston this year, ugh. Result? Record cool temperatures at WS. Those canyons that are normally 100+... mid 50s. Was I still helped by the sauna training? No idea.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 


                Feeling the growl again

                  But it's also been proposed that you can get the higher blood volume of heat acclimatization by just sitting in a sauna after your workout. So in principle it seems you might be able to get the best of both worlds -- train hard in cool weather, then go sit in a sauna.

                  Effect of post-exercise sauna bathing on the endurance performance of competitive male runners

                   

                  I did a bunch of sauna training for Western States -- mostly after workouts, but including some jogging in place in the sauna. Just like running Boston this year, ugh. Result? Record cool temperatures at WS. Those canyons that are normally 100+... mid 50s. Was I still helped by the sauna training? No idea.

                   

                  Haven't some of the top Russians done just that for Comrades?

                   

                  Yeah, that would be a better solution.  I would actually enjoy a sauna.  When I was in northern MI for college they were a cultural icon and we used it daily after practice.  Now, I'd have to build one....I don't even know where I would find one around here.

                   

                  MTA:  Nice effort at WS100, BTW.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   


                  I've got a fever...

                    Yep. I prefer 90ish in the evening to 75ish in the morning.

                     

                    Starting a run a little before sunset and finishing in the gathering evening twilight might be the absolute best time to run in the summer.  No direct sunlight (which is the real enemy here, let's not forget that), and low relative humidity (because the air temp is usually way above the dew point at that time of day).

                    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.


                    I've got a fever...

                      So by getting up at 5am to run in 70F instead of 98F in the afternoon, I'm doing it wrong?

                       

                      I think you're only doing it wrong if you go out and run in direct, hot sunlight. Sol is the real enemy. Late evening near dusk, the air temp might still be in the 80s or 90s, but without the sun beating down on you, it's fine.

                      On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                        Here's a pretty good explanation of dewpoint and relative humidity

                         

                        After reading that, I just checked the weather in eastern Colorado where I used to live, and my sister still lives.  Dewpoint on Monday reached 1F.  Temp was 105F, RH 2%.  You could hang your clothes out to dry, then go back to the other end of the line and bring them in. Smile

                        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                          I prefer the heat any day over the ice cold.  I got my start very early this morning and felt really comfortable in 76 to 85 degree weather.   I like running through the sprinklers too when it gets extra hot out there. Big grin

                          haroldIII


                            I always run in the morning because pollution levels are lower where I live at around 6 am.  80-90 points worse from the late afternoon to around 11 pm due to all the traffic.  I live in a pretty big city and despise treadmills, so it's on the streets before 6.  It's pretty hot, 85F and 76% humidity, but it won't be any better later.  However, you don't need to worry about that as much in rural areas, I guess.

                            For me, I get used to the heat by walking to work as often as I can.  You can feel the heat creep up as it gets close to summer, and then it blazes.  Avoid A/C as much as possible and drink warm things, like tea, throughout the day.  It helps a lot.


                            The Runner Life

                              The direct blazing sun is what really drains me, more so that the humidity.  If I have the choice, I would choose the warmer evening runs, just because I'd have all day to be wide awake and fueled by at least 2 meals.  Every time I run in the humidity, I'm soaked a mile in.  I have heard of benefits of training in the heat though, even if you know you're going to be racing when it's cool or cold.  I wish I still had the article, but someone compared the effects to that of altitude training.  There is an article that Running Times published showing the benefits of heat training.


                              Interval Junkie --Nobby

                                Local water fountains have now joined in the act: nothing like refreshing 80F water bubbling up to your lips.

                                2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

                                Current Status 06/19: Pelvic stress-fracture = 6-weeks of no running.

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