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Women, don't run! (Read 409 times)

    The only thing you can count on regarding someone with a Ph.D. is that they are more likely to show up for work than a high school dropout.

     

    This article is a good example of correlation implying causation, an anecdote reinforcing a weak prior.  Women have a higher prevalence of hypothyroidism than men and it strikes in the 20s/30s.  It happened to both my ex wife and my current wife, both non-runners.  It is possible that women are more susceptible to overtraining-induced endocrine issues, yet there is no clear link, certainly not in the articles that were referenced.

     

    Yet men may also develop mild to moderate hypothyroid symptoms due to endurance training.

     

    Carl Lewis, Galen Rupp, Alberto Salazar, Ryan Hall:  All have been treated for subclinical hypothyroidism.  Based on that, men shouldn't run either.

     

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323550604578412913149043072.html

    2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.

    FTYC


    Faster Than Your Couch!

      After reading a few paragraphs, I am convinced the author is much into science, understands its principles, and even more definitely understands how the body works. Oh yes, and he knows how to re-phrase, so that us women understand what it means. Thanks, pal, I couldn't get the point without you.

       

      BTW, 20+ hours of exercise weekly, that's about running 120+ miles per week. I don't know many people who do that, but, according to the author, this is just too common. Of course.

      Run for fun.

        I had a body builder try to tell me once that looking at the physique of (Olympic) sprinters vs. marathoners was PROOF that endurance running ate your muscles.

         

        Is that like the dog eating your homework??!

         

        Running eating muscles is one of the weirdest terms I hear in this sport. Or in my case, "sport."

          Well, it does happen. But you have to starve yourself and then run a very long way - ie use up your glycogen, then use up your available fat reserves.

           

          Quite hard to achieve really.


          Closed for repairs

            It happened to both my ex wife and my current wife, both non-runners.  It is possible that women are more susceptible to overtraining-induced endocrine issues, yet there is no clear link, certainly not in the articles that were referenced.

             

             

            It's obvious that it's women that are associated with you that are more susceptible to overtraining-induced endocrine issues.

             

              To be conclusive, he needs a larger sample size of wives/ex-wives.  Very expensive study to conduct based on my life experience.

               

              It's obvious that it's women that are associated with you that are more susceptible to overtraining-induced endocrine issues.

              What was I chasing again?

                To be conclusive, he needs a larger sample size of wives/ex-wives.  Very expensive study to conduct based on my life experience.

                 

                Focus on extremely wealthy wives... that way you might even come out richer Smile

                  To be conclusive, he needs a larger sample size of wives/ex-wives.  Very expensive study to conduct based on my life experience.

                   

                  And yet what I have so far is comparable to the sample sizes used in some of these "studies".

                  2013 H1:  7 hours/week base.  Q3: Train for goal race.  Q4:  Goal Race.

                  Kittyface


                    I'm too lazy to read the article. I'll just assume it's about my uterus falling out.

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