12

Core tempeture Drops after a Long Run (Read 1748 times)


Feeling the growl again

    That study is interesting, but from the methodology it doesn't really sound like they tested people who were likely to have been exercising long enough to really deplete glycogen stores. A few 2 min bursts on an exercise bike with recoveries. It's not clear how many - each time they upped the power output by 35W until failure. But that's not going to be very many intervals.

     

    The point was not to study energy depletion, which was why I said I'd also be interested in that after I posted the link.  They studied a more generalized reaction of the body's thermoregulation mechanisms -- potentially due to other things like increased circulation to the limbs during exercise.

     

    So yes, you're correct, it doesn't address the glycogen issue and I could not find anything on that easily.

    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

     

      My very scientific study.

       

      Pre run 97.4 degrees

       

      12 mile run in 52 to 48 (start and finish temp) I wore shorts and two long sleeve running shirts and a winter running hat.

       

      1:21:21 time

       

      Post run temp Immediately after finishing 98.2

       

      30 Minutes later 96.7 (post shower and diner)(PS i was absolutely freezing wearing a hoodie and blue jeans.)

       

      So that's all i have to say about that.   I have not idea what it means.

      2014 Goals:

      Not destroy my back while running.

        Noakes, 4th Edition, page 205 has some charts showing postrace rectal temperature in competitors in the 2000 and 2001 South African Ironman Triathlons.  Most were between 95 deg F and 102 deg F, with outliers as low as 90.5 deg F and as high as 104 deg F.  This data was from a study that showed no relationship between dehydration and postrace rectal temperature.

         

        I conclude that some runners are hotheads, others are frigid. 

          I have no idea and am just asking: do those ear-based thermometers work accurately if your ear if COLD, as in just-came-in-from-a-winter-run cold?

           

          Also, doesn't a hot shower trigger the body's cooling responses?

           

          I don't know either.  I do know that the ear thermometer is supposed to measure the temperature of your eardrum using an infrared sensor.  I do know that my measured ear temperature after a long hot shower was about 1 deg F warmer than before the shower.  My profile photo shows how my ears are covered when running in real cold weather. 

           

          Beyond that, I have only questions, not answers. 

            Noakes, 4th Edition, page 205 has some charts showing postrace rectal temperature in competitors in the 2000 and 2001 South African Ironman Triathlons.  Most were between 95 deg F and 102 deg F, with outliers as low as 90.5 deg F and as high as 104 deg F.  This data was from a study that showed no relationship between dehydration and postrace rectal temperature.

             

            I conclude that some runners are hotheads, others are frigid. 

             

            Anecdotally people only really get cold during long runs when it's cold (that's my experience). Presumably in the cases Noakes quotes it was hot weather?


            jules2

              After running a long run 13 plus miles core temperature drops and I'm freezing its hard to get warmed up.  Its takes a couple hours to get back to normal is it hydration?  Any ideas?

               

              I'm just the same after a long run or cycle and when I stop I can feel I'm getting cold even if I'm in a warm room. Yesterday I did 112k on the bike and it was quite cool when I finshed but I didn't feel cold until I stopped so I had a bath. I don't drink much so maybe that's the problem, so I'll drink more and see what happens

              Old age is when you move from illegal to prescribed drugs.


              HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                Anecdotally people only really get cold during long runs when it's cold (that's my experience).

                 

                Do you mean that you only get cold during long runs when it's cold, or that the humans you know in real life only do so?  (I got confused halfway through because you start out with "people" then end with "my experience".)

                It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                CMJHawk86


                  I have this issue as well. About 15-30 minutes after I stop, my fingers start turning white and then I start shivering. I always figured it was related to my core trying to warm itself and robbing heat from the extremities. It doesn't seem to matter whether I am indoors or still outside in the cold.

                   

                  If I can get to a hot shower, that takes care of it, though. Next best solution, say after a big marathon where you're far from your hotel, is to get dry clothes on and get something warm in you ASAP. Some protein, if you can get it down, seems to help as well. The two Starbucks along Boylston St. have brought me back after running the Boston Marathon more than once. 

                  CMJHawk86


                    Also, I have found that overdressing during the race can exacerbate the problem. I used to go with long sleeve underlayers a lot, now I just go with a singlet and arm warmers unless the temp is below freezing. It seems all that sweat on the surface still needs to escape, otherwise I have icicle sweat afterwards.

                      Do you mean that you only get cold during long runs when it's cold, or that the humans you know in real life only do so?  (I got confused halfway through because you start out with "people" then end with "my experience".)

                       

                      I just added the "in my experience" to add that my personal experience is in line with what I've heard others report.

                      Rod Staples


                        Well after reading all of the blogs on this subject  I have come to the conclusion we are all alike and to fix this, I think t instead of drinking cold liquids I am going to stick with warm hot drinks and see what happens it couldn't hurt maybe I will warm up alittle faster.  Thanks for all the info I think we have all benefited  from this.  Keep on running!!!


                        HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                          Well after reading all of the blogs on this subject  I have come to the conclusion we are all alike ...

                           

                          At least in real life, I know this varies from person to person (the issue of temperature, and reaction thereto).

                           

                          (Maybe all the imaginary internet people are the same, or preach the same.)

                          It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                            I really shouldn't comment, because I know very little (so take what I write for what it's worth....), but....

                             

                            I live in Texas and it's very hot in the summer here.

                            In the summer, when I run outside, it's brutal (100+ degrees many / most summer days).

                             

                            I think to myself that when I run in temperatures more than "98.6*", my core temperature is rising to levels that cause challenges to me (ie. running induced fever).

                             

                            I guess that the opposite would be true... When it's much colder than "98.6*", my core temperature may decrease....

                             

                            ---

                            I know that when I did a race in June here in Texas (10k) starting at about 9:30am after a swim and a bike (olympic distance triathlon), I was heat exhausted and sick after running the first of 2 loops.  There wasn't enough shade or water to keep me from feeling like crap while I was running.

                             

                            ---

                            I know that when I did a training run in the cold in December (mid 30's temp), I was cold at the end and I got the shivers when finished.  Didn't take my temp, but I'd be surprised it I was "normal".

                             

                            ----

                            Both had long time effort (2 1/2 hours)

                            Both were good workouts and took me to the limit.

                            But, they had opposite challenges for my body due to opposite weather challenges.

                             

                            (As I said, I know nothing official, so take what I wrote for what it's worth).


                            Cheers,
                            Brian

                            2014 Goals:

                            #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                            #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                             

                            12