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A 2 hour half marathon on 3.5 months training? (Read 1809 times)


Not Your Average Joe

    Need three pieces of advice.  Can it be done?  Should it be done?  How can it be done?  My particulars follow.

     

    Can it be done?  Very simple question.  My current condition: 34, male, 227 lbs, 5'11", out of shape.  I've had an on again, off again relationship with running for the past year and a half.  Current running relationship: back on after 3 months off, see my running log for details.  Half marathon PR is currently 2:16:03 at last year's version of my goal race in mid October.  The course is flat and fast.  I did no training for last year's race in the month prior, took a leisurely bathroom break at mile 6, and still PRed by 2 mintutes. (Sorry, this race is sold out!)

     

    Should it be done?  Is this too ambitious a project for me considering my weight, fitness level, and running times?  I'm willing to put in the effort, but I'm concerned I might be pushing too hard.  I really feel like I need to push though.

     

    How can it be done? What is the best way to approach this?  I'm already dropping weight.  I plan to be 190 lbs on race day, or less if it so happens.  I already know this will help my speed.  Should I work speed or endurance first, or both in tandem?  What's the best way to gain speed over longer distances?  Has anyone done something similar to what I'm attempting?

     

    All advice is greatly appreciated and if more details are needed, let me know.

    Hi!


    an amazing likeness

      Sure, it can be done.

      Can it be done by you? Who knows?

      Only one way to find out.

      Run.

      Lots.

      Mostly easy.

      Some fast(er).

      You want endurance.

      Should it be done? 

      That's purely up to you.

      Choosing my words carefully has never been my strength I've been known to be vague and often pointless


      just a simple cat

        You are only 34, and you have a red beard?  You can definitely do it.

         

        Running is stupid


        The Irreverent Reverand

          40 pounds in 3 months? That's a huge drop, perhaps not the most realistic or even ideal, it seems to me. And to be honest, I'm not sure that it is the smartest goal, but pull up a chair and listen to my story (similar age, weight when I started running) for a sec.

           

          I began running in April 2010 (at age 35), after 17 years of not running, using the Couch to 5K program, weighing in at nearly 240 pounds and terribly out of shape. I ran a few times per week until August, getting up to long runs of 8 miles, when I got wicked shin splints that shut me down until early October (damn salesman sold me a shoe that was meant for, uh, smaller guys than me, and I blew through them in about 100 miles, and killed my shins). Then, I gutted out a 10 Miler in late October (1:40) with only two weeks back at running. I ran a half marathon a few weeks later ... at 2:04. Then in March, after much more training and injury-free, I ran my first marathon at 3:52 (with a half split of 1:55).

           

          All this is to day that the time goal is certainly possible ... but I'm not sure that I'd make it your goal for your first half marathon after just getting (back) into shape (again). Seems like a lot to do in a short period of time. 

          I'd say make 2 hours your stretch goal, but set another goal - such as simply finishing or PRing - as your main goal.

           

          Just my two cents. 

          Husband. Father of three. Lutheran pastor. National Guardsman. Runner. Political junkie. Baseball fan.

           

          Goals for 2014:

          Sub-3:30 marathon; run for a year free from major injuries or interruptions

          PRs: 3:27 marathon; 1:41 half; 45:07 10K; 23:26 5K; 6:02 mile; <12 parsecs Kessel Run

          xor


            I began running in April 2010 (at age 35), after 17 years of not running, using the Couch to 5K program, weighing in at nearly 240 pounds and terribly out of shape. ... Then in March 2011, after much more training and injury-free, I ran my first marathon at 3:52 (with a half split of 1:55).

             

             

            Dude!

             

            Congrats.  That is very nice.

             

            Shoe


              Need three pieces of advice.  Can it be done?  Should it be done?  How can it be done?  My particulars follow.

               

              Can it be done?  Very simple question.  My current condition: 34, male, 227 lbs, 5'11", out of shape.  I've had an on again, off again relationship with running for the past year and a half.  Current running relationship: back on after 3 months off, see my running log for details.  Half marathon PR is currently 2:16:03 at last year's version of my goal race in mid October.  The course is flat and fast.  I did no training for last year's race in the month prior, took a leisurely bathroom break at mile 6, and still PRed by 2 mintutes. (Sorry, this race is sold out!)

               

              Should it be done?  Is this too ambitious a project for me considering my weight, fitness level, and running times?  I'm willing to put in the effort, but I'm concerned I might be pushing too hard.  I really feel like I need to push though.

               

              How can it be done? What is the best way to approach this?  I'm already dropping weight.  I plan to be 190 lbs on race day, or less if it so happens.  I already know this will help my speed.  Should I work speed or endurance first, or both in tandem?  What's the best way to gain speed over longer distances?  Has anyone done something similar to what I'm attempting?

               

              All advice is greatly appreciated and if more details are needed, let me know.

               

              30 lb itself can make a big difference. . 

               

              Endurance.  Definitely endurance.  You are not running very much at all right now; that is almost certainly your limiting factor. (More than almost when you see the drop off from 5k pace to 10K pace, pretty dramatic.) Sometimes faster, but I would not worry about structured speedwork from the point you are at.  Biggest worry right now is getting your mileage up safely... and consistently!  Consistency makes more of a difference than anything, I think.

                How do your easy paced runs feel?  I ask because most I checked were 5K at 30 sec per mile slower than 5K race pace and over a minute per mile faster than your 10K pace from April (cooler?)  

               

               

              Last piece of advice--- why not try?  You can tell in 3 months whether you'll be going for sub 2, in the meanwhile, it's a great motivator to focus on training. 


              Not Your Average Joe

                Chris, good stuff man!

                 

                40 pounds in 3 months? That's a huge drop, perhaps not the most realistic or even ideal, it seems to me. And to be honest, I'm not sure that it is the smartest goal, but pull up a chair and listen to my story (similar age, weight when I started running) for a sec.

                 

                I'm pretty confident in my ability to lose this weight safely. I listen to my body and when it says, "Sorry, you're out of calories," I stop running. The first half of it will drop off in the first month anyway and the rest will come off more slowly.

                 

                I'd say make 2 hours your stretch goal, but set another goal - such as simply finishing or PRing - as your main goal.

                 

                Good advice and something I've already started thinking about. I'd be happy with a PR, more satisfied with a 10:00 pace (2:10:00 time), but the sub 2 hours is something I really want to push for. The 10:00 pace I was doing for 11 miles back in January, so I know I can hit that in 3 months. I just feel like I need to push harder than that and hit a more ambitious goal. Time will tell and in mid-September, I should have a good feel about where my training is at and what I'll be capable of on race day.

                Hi!


                Not Your Average Joe

                  Shoe,

                   

                  To be honest, my easy runs feel a bit ragged at the end.  I have to push to get to a 10:00 pace.  Of course some days are better than others.  Most of the time I'm way out of the "comfortable conversation" zone at the end.

                   

                  Thanks for the advice.  Slower and longer probably make more sense from my fitness level right now. I can start adding a mile here and there and doing longish runs on the weekend for now and worry about the speed in September.

                  Hi!

                    Shoe,

                     

                    To be honest, my easy runs feel a bit ragged at the end.  I have to push to get to a 10:00 pace.  Of course some days are better than others.  Most of the time I'm way out of the "comfortable conversation" zone at the end.

                     

                    Thanks for the advice.  Slower and longer probably make more sense from my fitness level right now. I can start adding a mile here and there and doing longish runs on the weekend for now and worry about the speed in September.

                     IF you are ragged at the end of an 'easy' run, it is not easy for you.  Your pace may be 'easy' for an in-shape runner, but for you, it obviously is not.  My easy runs are about a 10:00min/mi pace, but I've also been running for about 10years, with 3 years having a focus on 5k+ distances.

                    'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

                     

                    "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

                     

                    "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

                    xor


                      >> IF you are ragged at the end of an 'easy' run, it is not easy for you.

                       

                      Unless your name is Ann or Andy and then perhaps.  But perhaps not.

                       


                      A Saucy Wench

                        >> IF you are ragged at the end of an 'easy' run, it is not easy for you.

                         

                        Unless your name is Ann or Andy and then perhaps.  But perhaps not.

                         

                        Not.

                        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                         

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                        xor


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